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Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ion of an earthwork, known afterward as Fort Wagner, on Morris Island, distant about two thousand five hundred yards from Sumed to pass without returning the fire from batteries on Morris Island; when within easy range of Fort Sumter they were to opet colors were seen; the vessels passed between them and Morris Island, but nor far from them, perhaps within one hundred and r to co-operate with General Hunter in the reduction of Morris Island, which, for reasons quite obvious, could not then be ent allow the enemy to erect new batteries or defences on Morris Island. If he has begun it, drive him out. I do not herein ornd judicious co-operation you can take the batteries on Morris Island and Sullivan's Island and Fort Sumter. But whether yous, they would have been in great peril of being lost on Morris Island beach. Their ground-tackling has been found to be insuto re-occupy the unsafe anchorage for the ironclads off Morris Island, and an intimation that a renewal of the attack on Char
Nahant (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
gun was fired twelve times. The vessel was struck fifty-one times. During the action the turret was jammed; six or seven nut-heads driven off had fallen inside and rendered it necessary to key up the turret to enable it to revolve. A number of side-plates were started, so that another shot would probably have broken them off. One rifle-shot was driven through the armor into the wood, and one deck-plate was started from a blow on the side armor. Other serious injuries were named. The Nahant reports that, following in line of battle, the vessel became hotly engaged. She soon began to suffer from the terrible fire to which she was subjected. At 4.30 the turret, having become jammed from the effects of three shots, refused to turn. One of these shot broke off a piece of iron in the interior weighing seventy-eight pounds, and throwing it violently across the house bent and disarranged the steering gear. Bolt-heads (nuts from the bolts) flying from the inside of the pilot-house
Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, and was followed by the five monitors yet outside, and by the Keokuk. He intended to proceed the same day to the attack of Fort Sumter, and thence to the city of Charleston, but the weather became so hazy that the ranges could not be seen and the pilots refused to go farther. The state of the atmosphere prevented a satisfactory examination of an earthwork, known afterward as Fort Wagner, on Morris Island, distant about two thousand five hundred yards from Sumter, of the batteries on Cumming's Point, and of the heavy earthworks flanking Moultrie. The order of battle was line ahead as follows: The Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers, with a raft on the bows to explode torpedoes, It was formed of very heavy timbers crossing at right angles, bolted together, about fifty feet in length, shaped not unlike a boot-jack, the bows of the vessel propelling within the notch. The after-ends or jaws of the raft were secured by chains to the bow of the vessel. The wave-motion acting on this
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
. A. Lincoln. To Admiral Dupont. The following day the President issued further instructions: executive Mansion, April 14, 1863. This is intended to clear up an apparent inconsistency between the recent order to continue operations before Charleston, and the former one to remove to another point in a certain contingency. No censure upon you, or either of you, is intended; we still hope by cordial and judicious co-operation you can take the batteries on Morris Island and Sullivan's Island and Fort Sumter. But whether you can or not, we wish the demonstration kept up for a time, for a collateral and very important object; we wish the attempt to be a real one (though not a desperate one) if it affords any considerable chance of success. But if prosecuted for a demonstration only, this must not be made public, or the whole effect will be lost. Once again before Charleston, do not leave till further orders from here. Of course this is not intended to force you to leave
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. On April 2, 1863, the Rear-Admiral left Port Royal to join the ironclads, as the monitors were styled, at North Edisto, and on the morning of the 5th left for Charleston Bar with all of them in tow of suitable vessels. As previously arranged, on arrival, the Keokuk, aided by Captain Boutelle and Master Platt of the Coast Survey, sounded and buoyed the bar of the main ship channel, supported by the monitors Patapsco and Catskill. This was soon accomplished, and before dark these two monitors anchored within. At high tide on the following morning, the Admiral came in on board of the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner, and was followed by the five monitors yet outside, and by the Keokuk. He intended to proceed the same day to the attack of Fort Sumter, and thence to the city of Charleston, but the weather became so hazy that the ranges could not be seen and the pilots refused to go farther. The state of the atmosphere prevented a satis
Catskill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
sel, making it impossible to fight them advantageously, to avoid dangers, or to make a satisfactory reconnoissance. Owing to the breaking of the cap-square bolts of the rifle, that gun delivered only five shells; the Xv-inch fired the same number. The vessel was struck forty-seven times. Forty bolts of the smoke-stack were broken and a chain afterward put around it for security. The vessel was not disabled, but injuries were received which, if multiplied, would have disabled her. The Catskill reports that at 2.50 the forts and batteries opened on the head of the line. The flag-ship (New Ironsides) becoming unmanageable from shoal water and strong tide, the Catskill passed her, and at 3.35 the first shot struck her. She approached within six hundred yards of Sumter, and one of her Xv-inch shells apparently dismounted a barbette gun. The cross fire to which she was subjected was most severe. The same obstructions reported by the four preceding vessels were observed. Surprise wa
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. On April 2, 1863, the Rear-Admiral left Port Royal to join the ironclads, as the monitors were styled, at North Edisto, and on the morning of the 5th left for Charleston Bar with all of them in tow of suitable vessels. As previously arranged, on arrival, the Keokuk, aided by Captain Boutelle and Master Platt of the Coast Survey, sounded and buoyed the bar of the main ship channel, supported by the monitors Patapsco and Catskill. This was soon accomplished, and before dark these two monitors anchored within. At high tide on the following morning, the Admiral came in on board of the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner, and was followed by the five monitors yet outside, and by the Keokuk. He intended to proceed the same day to the attack of Fort Sumter, and thence to the city of Charleston, but the weather became so hazy that the ranges could not be seen and the pilots refused to go farther. The state of the atmosphere prevented a satis
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
n the vessels shows that they were incapable of enduring heavy blows sufficiently long to effect the destruction of Sumter, as they were situated, or as it was supposed possible to place them. There was considerable swell even between the forts at the time of the attack, and the flood tide ran strong and irregularly, which added to the embarrassment. Afloat as elsewhere leeks have to be eaten sometimes, whether liked or not, as an old proverb has it. An examination of the chart of Charleston Harbor, with its batteries and obstructions of various kinds, as shown in 1865, and the experience gained subsequent to the attack (bearing in mind, too, the condition of the batteries of the vessels on the 7th of April), would point rather to the probability of disaster than to success, had an attempt been made to enter. The reader has been informed of the strength of the attacking force in guns and in material resistance, and the failure of many of the guns to operate when they were most
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
reased the accuracy of fire from the forts as the vessels passed. As the narrow part of the channel was approached, the flood tide became strong, setting the vessels in, and made them additionally unmanageable. Soon after getting within the heavy fire of the batteries, the Weehawken signalled obstructions in her vicinity, and previous to that a torpedo had exploded close to her; Captain Rodgers' report states: We approached very close to the obstructions extending from Fort Sumter to Fort Moultrie—as near, indeed, as I could get without running upon them. They were marked by rows of casks very near together. To the eye they appeared almost to touch one another, and there was more than one line of them. The appearance was so formidable that, upon deliberate judgment, I thought it right not to entangle the vessel in obstructions which I did not think we could have passed through, and in which we should have been caught. Beyond these, piles were seen between Castle Pinckney and
Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
would have converted a failure into a disaster. He stated that in his opinion Charleston could not be taken by a purely naval attack, and the army could not give co-operation. Had he succeeded in entering the harbor, he would have had 1,200 men, with 32 guns; but five of the seven ironclads were wholly or partially disabled after a brief engagement. He had alluded above only to Forts Sumter and Moultrie, but the vessels were also exposed to the fire of the batteries on Cummings Point, Mount Pleasant, the Redan, and Fort Beauregard. In a more detailed report to the Department, dated April 15th, Admiral Dupont gives with particularity the fire delivered by the vessels engaged and the injuries sustained by them, and adds, that in his belief any attempt to pass through the obstructions referred to would have entangled the vessels and held them under the most severe fire of heavy ordnance that had ever been delivered, and while it was barely possible that some vessels might have force
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