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Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
itness the triumph of the Atlanta, saw instead, their pride and their hope in the possession of the enemy. They certainly had not long to wait, and, however painful the suspense, it was of short duration. The armament of the Atlanta was two Vii-inch and two VI: 4/10-inch rifled guns, two of which could be pivoted either on broadside or ahead and astern. Length of vessel, 204 feet; extreme breadth, 41 feet; draught, 16 feet. A more detailed description will be found in the volume of Professor Soley. The superstructure was built on a staunch new steamer known as the Fingal, with excellent enginery. The plating was four inches in thickness, composed of two plates, but of little tenacity, as it shattered almost like cast-iron. Chronometers and other nautical instruments found on board disclosed the fact that the builders intended the vessel for sea purposes, and the boldness of her commander indicated the belief that she was far superior to any of the rams in Charleston Harbor.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t the wheel. An Xi-inch solid shot struck the edge of the overhang, breaking the plating; the fourth, supposed to be of the same size, struck a port-stopper in the centre, breaking it in two, and driving many of the fragments into the casemate. The crew was composed of 21 officers and a complement of 121 enlisted men, 16 of whom were wounded. The captured officers estimated her speed at ten knots, and regarded the Confederate ironclad Atlanta, captured in Wassaw Sound, June 17, 1863. Atlanta as the strongest ironclad of the Confederates, and quite a match for the two monitors. Confident and enthusiastic friends on board of the two steamers that had come from Savannah to witness the triumph of the Atlanta, saw instead, their pride and their hope in the possession of the enemy. They certainly had not long to wait, and, however painful the suspense, it was of short duration. The armament of the Atlanta was two Vii-inch and two VI: 4/10-inch rifled guns, two of which could b
Warsaw Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
r by sending the monitors Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers commanding, and Nahant, Commander John Downes, to Wassaw Sound, from whence she was expected to come out. The admiral had the satisfaction of reporting to the Department on June 17th the capture of the Atlanta on that day. At early dawn she was discovered coming down Wilmington River, accompanied by a propeller and a side-wheel steamer. The Weehawken and Nahant slipped their cables and steamed outward for the northeast end of Wassaw Island; the ram and hers consorts steamed down rapidly, apparently thinking them in retreat. After preparations were completed and broad daylight had come, at 4.30 the Weehawken and Nahant turned and stood up to meet their adversary. At a distance of a mile and a half the Atlanta fired a rifle shell, which passed over the stern of the Weehawken and struck near the Nahant.. She then laid across the channel and awaited an attack. At a distance of about three hundred yards the Weehawken opened
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
y distance at which her battery could have been used effectively. The contract calls for one iron-clad, shot-proof, steam battery on Whitney's plan, the vessel to be wholly of iron. Length, 159 feet; beam, 39 feet; depth of hold, 3 1/2 feet, and draught; 8 feet. The said vessel shall have capacity and stability safely to carry and work a battery of two Xi-inch guns, . . the vessel and the two turrets and the pilot-house to be shot-proof against ordnance used in the naval service of the United States. The turrets, as they were called, were two oval casemates. The above comprises all that the contract calls for, so far as invulnerability is concerned, and no mention is made of her in this regard, or of her qualities in the report on Armored Vessels, 1864. So far as memory serves, the armor-plating, as it was called, was one and a half or two inches thick, and an inner skin of perhaps three-fourths of an inch. Her role was short, and she would not have proved a success anywhere, w
Warsaw Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
f the weak vessels that for the most part maintained the blockade. The vessel was reputed strong. Timely provision was made to meet her by sending the monitors Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers commanding, and Nahant, Commander John Downes, to Wassaw Sound, from whence she was expected to come out. The admiral had the satisfaction of reporting to the Department on June 17th the capture of the Atlanta on that day. At early dawn she was discovered coming down Wilmington River, accompanied by aents into the casemate. The crew was composed of 21 officers and a complement of 121 enlisted men, 16 of whom were wounded. The captured officers estimated her speed at ten knots, and regarded the Confederate ironclad Atlanta, captured in Wassaw Sound, June 17, 1863. Atlanta as the strongest ironclad of the Confederates, and quite a match for the two monitors. Confident and enthusiastic friends on board of the two steamers that had come from Savannah to witness the triumph of the Atlant
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ts or ships. By April 13th all of the monitors had been sent to Port Royal for repairs, and as fast as finished were sent to North Edisto, the inland waters of which were contiguous, and actually afforded a better base for menacing or taking Charleston than Morris or Sullivan's Island. Had both of these islands been in possession of the National forces, Charleston would certainly have been a sealed port, but so far as its attack from a land force was concerned, even then an approach from Stono and North Edisto would have been more practicable, considering the support derivable from guns afloat. The admiral had reason to suppose that at any day the monitor force, with the exception of two vessels, would be ordered to the Mississippi, and so it was held in expectancy. Definite information was obtained of the approaching readiness of the ram Atlanta to leave Savannah, with the intention of sweeping the coast of the weak vessels that for the most part maintained the blockade. The
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e armor-plating, as it was called, was one and a half or two inches thick, and an inner skin of perhaps three-fourths of an inch. Her role was short, and she would not have proved a success anywhere, whether against forts or ships. By April 13th all of the monitors had been sent to Port Royal for repairs, and as fast as finished were sent to North Edisto, the inland waters of which were contiguous, and actually afforded a better base for menacing or taking Charleston than Morris or Sullivan's Island. Had both of these islands been in possession of the National forces, Charleston would certainly have been a sealed port, but so far as its attack from a land force was concerned, even then an approach from Stono and North Edisto would have been more practicable, considering the support derivable from guns afloat. The admiral had reason to suppose that at any day the monitor force, with the exception of two vessels, would be ordered to the Mississippi, and so it was held in expectanc
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
to suppose that at any day the monitor force, with the exception of two vessels, would be ordered to the Mississippi, and so it was held in expectancy. Definite information was obtained of the approaching readiness of the ram Atlanta to leave Savannah, with the intention of sweeping the coast of the weak vessels that for the most part maintained the blockade. The vessel was reputed strong. Timely provision was made to meet her by sending the monitors Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers commandirate ironclad Atlanta, captured in Wassaw Sound, June 17, 1863. Atlanta as the strongest ironclad of the Confederates, and quite a match for the two monitors. Confident and enthusiastic friends on board of the two steamers that had come from Savannah to witness the triumph of the Atlanta, saw instead, their pride and their hope in the possession of the enemy. They certainly had not long to wait, and, however painful the suspense, it was of short duration. The armament of the Atlanta was
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
three-fourths of an inch. Her role was short, and she would not have proved a success anywhere, whether against forts or ships. By April 13th all of the monitors had been sent to Port Royal for repairs, and as fast as finished were sent to North Edisto, the inland waters of which were contiguous, and actually afforded a better base for menacing or taking Charleston than Morris or Sullivan's Island. Had both of these islands been in possession of the National forces, Charleston would certainly have been a sealed port, but so far as its attack from a land force was concerned, even then an approach from Stono and North Edisto would have been more practicable, considering the support derivable from guns afloat. The admiral had reason to suppose that at any day the monitor force, with the exception of two vessels, would be ordered to the Mississippi, and so it was held in expectancy. Definite information was obtained of the approaching readiness of the ram Atlanta to leave Savannah
Wilmington River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
on of sweeping the coast of the weak vessels that for the most part maintained the blockade. The vessel was reputed strong. Timely provision was made to meet her by sending the monitors Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers commanding, and Nahant, Commander John Downes, to Wassaw Sound, from whence she was expected to come out. The admiral had the satisfaction of reporting to the Department on June 17th the capture of the Atlanta on that day. At early dawn she was discovered coming down Wilmington River, accompanied by a propeller and a side-wheel steamer. The Weehawken and Nahant slipped their cables and steamed outward for the northeast end of Wassaw Island; the ram and hers consorts steamed down rapidly, apparently thinking them in retreat. After preparations were completed and broad daylight had come, at 4.30 the Weehawken and Nahant turned and stood up to meet their adversary. At a distance of a mile and a half the Atlanta fired a rifle shell, which passed over the stern of the
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