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Granby, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
as instantaneous and complete. Of the 250 a few escaped to the brush and the rest were killed. The spoils of the expedition were 200 new minie rifles, lately issued to them at Fort Scott. Gen. James S. Rains was in command of the unorganized infantry, and with about 2,500 of them was encamped on the Pea Ridge battlefield, protecting the transportation of lead from the Granby mines to Little Rock. To stop this supply of a prime necessity of war to the Confederates, the Federals occupied Granby with a force 500 strong. Maj. David Shanks was sent by Shelby with five companies of his regiment to drive them out, which he did on the morning of the 23d by charging their pickets with his whole force and going into the town with them. The Federals were surprised and fled, losing 27 killed and wounded and 43 prisoners. All the lead that had been accumulated under the supervision of the Federals was loaded in wagons and sent to Rains' camp. But these were mostly forays, and served no p
Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
left with their commands, there was for some months a steady stream of organized and unorganized regiments and companies moving across the river and falling into line wherever ordered. Nothing but imbecility prevented the Federals, after the battle of Pea Ridge, from moving southward and taking possession of the country to the Arkansas river or to the Red river, or, for that matter, to the Gulf of Mexico. But Curtis was in command, and he was an exceedingly conservative soldier. After Pea Ridge he acted more like a commander of a beaten army, anxious to avoid the enemy, than a commander who had fought and won a great battle and was eager to secure the fruits of his victory. He clamored incessantly for reinforcements when there was no enemy to oppose him, and not until the first of June did he get things to warrant him, in his own mind, in taking the offensive. Then he was supported by an ironclad fleet on White river, and a cooperating force, 7,000 or 8,000 strong, was moving
Lone Jack (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
pter 10: The Trans Mississippi department open to Federal Occupation Hindman Takes command Shelby Goes into Missouri to raise a regiment battle of Lone Jack three regiments organized at Newtonia a brigade formed with Shelby commanding the fight at Newtonia Hindman Superseded Holmes orders troops out of Missouri and his death was a great loss to the cause. Col. John T. Coffee and Col. Upton Hays were also recruiting in the same section of country. At the small town of Lone Jack, in the southeastern part of Jackson county, there was a considerable Federal force, estimated at 1,000 men with two pieces of artillery, under the command of Mahalf their number killed and wounded, with their artillery and their commander, supposed to be mortally wounded, though he afterwards recovered. This fight at Lone Jack was of no great importance as far as the general result of the war was concerned, but it was as fiercely contested and bloody a fight for the number of men enga
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
25,000 to 30,000 infantry in northwest Arkansas and southwest Missouri behind 5,000 or 10,000 cavalry, which were to drive the Federals back as far at least as Springfield; then, by a rapid movement of cavalry and infantry—the first north and the last south of Springfield—to force the enemy to fight at a disadvantage or surrender,Springfield—to force the enemy to fight at a disadvantage or surrender, the only practical line of retreat being held by his cavalry. In other words, he intended to do what McCulloch might have done, but did not do, after the battle of Wilson's Creek. Most of the infantry required for the expedition were in camp at Little Rock and on White and Black rivers, and reinforcements were constantly arrivinide of the State line and keep the peace, the Federals on the north side of the line were not so kindly disposed. General Schofield had withdrawn his army to Springfield and gone into winter quarters. But General Blunt, of Kansas, a rugged soldier and fighter, had concentrated a heavy force at Fayetteville with the view of cros<
LaFayette County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
the dismounted men had got horses. Shelby's plan was to attack the enemy's troops wherever he met them. If he could not whip them, the pause that followed the attack gave him time to get away. Thus marching and fighting he made his way to Lafayette county—his home county—and there commenced the active work of raising a regiment. Accompanying him was Col. Vard Cockrell, who turned aside when near the Missouri river and went into Jackson county. Shortly before, Gen. John T. Hughes and Col. he different commands encamped and set about the work of organization in earnest. There were enough recruits to make three regiments, composed of as good soldierly material as could be found anywhere. Jo O. Shelby was chosen colonel of the Lafayette county regiment; B. F. Gordon, lieutenant-colonel; and George Kirtley, major. The Jackson county regiment elected Upton Hays, colonel; Beal G. Jeans, lieutenant-colonel; and Charles Gilkey, major. The southwest regiment elected John T. Coffee, co
Independence, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
as Col. Vard Cockrell, who turned aside when near the Missouri river and went into Jackson county. Shortly before, Gen. John T. Hughes and Col. Gideon W. Thompson had raised a considerable body of men and defeated a Federal force at Independence, in Jackson county, but General Hughes was killed just as the enemy gave way. He was a brave and intelligent officer, full of zeal and enthusiasm, and his death was a great loss to the cause. Col. John T. Coffee and Col. Upton Hays were also recruitin force, estimated at 1,000 men with two pieces of artillery, under the command of Maj. Emery Foster, and Colonels Cockrell, Hays and Coffee determined to attack it with their combined force and that of Colonel Thompson, who had been wounded at Independence, amounting to about 800 men. The attack was made just at daylight on the morning of August 16, 1862. It was intended to be a surprise, but the premature discharge of a gun alarmed the Federals before the Confederates got in line. The advanta
Newton County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
y every town, and the roads were patrolled daily and sometimes nightly. Anything in the shape of a horse that could travel was in demand. The trappings made less difference: If a saddle could not be had a blanket would do. If a bridle were lacking one could be made of rope and rawhide. Every man had a good Mississippi rifle and 140 rounds of ammunition. When the time came for starting, those who did not have a horse or a mule joined the column on foot. Not until the command got into Newton county was it really in the country of the enemy. By that time the dismounted men had got horses. Shelby's plan was to attack the enemy's troops wherever he met them. If he could not whip them, the pause that followed the attack gave him time to get away. Thus marching and fighting he made his way to Lafayette county—his home county—and there commenced the active work of raising a regiment. Accompanying him was Col. Vard Cockrell, who turned aside when near the Missouri river and went in
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
les, lately issued to them at Fort Scott. Gen. James S. Rains was in command of the unorganized infantry, and with about 2,500 of them was encamped on the Pea Ridge battlefield, protecting the transportation of lead from the Granby mines to Little Rock. To stop this supply of a prime necessity of war to the Confederates, the Federals occupied Granby with a force 500 strong. Maj. David Shanks was sent by Shelby with five companies of his regiment to drive them out, which he did on the morni only practical line of retreat being held by his cavalry. In other words, he intended to do what McCulloch might have done, but did not do, after the battle of Wilson's Creek. Most of the infantry required for the expedition were in camp at Little Rock and on White and Black rivers, and reinforcements were constantly arriving from southern Arkansas and Texas; and besides these, General Rains had 3,000 or 4,000 men of the old Missouri State Guard in his command, which hovered about the southe
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
g. He was fertile in resource; prompt, aggressive, and regardless of the forms of law when they conflicted with the accomplishment of the purpose he had in view. He began the work of making an army by stopping, en route for Corinth, a force of more than a thousand Texas cavalry, and using them to deceive and frighten Curtis, as well as making them the nucleus of the army he was about to organize. He created the belief that he was receiving heavy reinforcements from southern Arkansas and Louisiana and Texas, and an abundant supply of arms and munitions of war from east of the Mississippi, and caused information to that effect to reach Curtis. With his cavalry he hovered around him, drove in his pickets, and at every favorable opportunity attacked him in flank and rear. These maneuvers and deceptions had their effect, for in a short time Curtis became alarmed and retired with his army of 15,000 men from Bayou Des Arc to the cover of his ironclads on White river, and then to Helena
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
egiment and Col. Gideon W. Thompson ordered to take command of it. Shelby was ordered by Marmaduke to report to him near Van Buren. But if the Confederates, acting in accordance with the letter and spirit of General Holmes' orders, were inclined to stay on the south side of the State line and keep the peace, the Federals on the north side of the line were not so kindly disposed. General Schofield had withdrawn his army to Springfield and gone into winter quarters. But General Blunt, of Kansas, a rugged soldier and fighter, had concentrated a heavy force at Fayetteville with the view of crossing the Boston mountains and disturbing the repose of the Confederates in the Arkansas valley. Marmaduke was ordered to oppose him, and on the 17th of November moved out from his camp near Van Buren, with Shelby's brigade, reinforced with Arthur Carroll's brigade of Arkansas cavalry. Cane Hill was his objective point. Lieut. Arthur McCoy, with a force of fifty picked men, surprised and rout
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