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Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Congress chosen Fremont's bodyguard defeated at Springfield Hunter Succeeds Fremont and Retreats reorganizat and Second Confederate brigades. On reaching Springfield, Maj. S. D. Sturgis, who had taken command of the0,000 in gold taken from the branch State bank at Springfield. The remainder of the army moved the same night.l Price, with the State Guard, took possession of Springfield and went to work recruiting, organizing and drillte. The force with which he was now advancing on Springfield was variously estimated at from 40,000 to 50,000 ducive to their comfort. When Fremont approached Springfield, Price retreated to Cassville and then to Pinevilhe Ozark mountains as possible. Fremont occupied Springfield as soon as Price evacuated it, but his entrance ibodyguard of an empress. The advance in entering Springfield was given to this crack company of the corps daelto Rolla. As soon as Hunter left, Price occupied Springfield again, and a little later moved northward to Osce
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the State, had very little significance of any kind, but closed the military record in Missouri for the year 1861. The Confederates, under General Polk, had occupied Columbus, Ky., and with their batteries controlled the navigation of the Mississippi river. To strengthen their position a Confederate force, under General Pillow, occupied the opposite bank of the river in Missouri. Col. U. S. Grant was sent with a brigade of Illinois troops to dislodge them. At first the Federals gained some utant-general; John Reid, commissary; James Harding, quartermaster; Robert C. Wood, aide-de-camp; R. M. Morrison, aide-de-camp; Clay Taylor, aide-de-camp; T. D. Wooten, medical director; M. M. Pallen, surgeon. Subsequently, and east of the Mississippi river, they were: L. A. Maclean, assistant adjutant-general; J. M. Loughborough, assistant adjutant-general; A. M. Clark, inspector; Thomas H. Price, ordnance officer; Clay Taylor, chief of artillery; J. M. Brinker, quartermaster; E. C. Cabell, p
Osage (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
s time. He began his retreat on the 27th of September. He sent a considerable force of mounted men to make Fremont and Sturgis and Lane believe he was about to attack each of them. The ruse succeeded. Each stopped, and Fremont commenced fortifying in the neighborhood of Georgetown, where he was concentrating his forces. This gave Price time to move his infantry and artillery, aggregating about 8,000 men, unmolested, until he got south of his pursuers. He crossed his command over the Osage river in flat boats, built by his men for the purpose, in one-fourth the time it afterward took Fremont to cross at the same place on his pontoon bridges. He then continued his retreat leisurely to Neosho, where the legislature was assembled. The legislature passed an act of secession. In every particular it complied with the forms of law. It was called together in extraordinary session by the proclamation of the governor. There was a quorum of each house present. The governor sent to th
Missouri (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
o depots of subsistence or clothing or ammunition. There were no muster rolls and no reports. The Federals held the Missouri river and it was a block to recruiting in the northern part of the State. Home Guards, armed from the arsenal at St. Louis the unwieldy mass assumed coherence and form. In less than a month Price was able to move in the direction of the Missouri river with a force of about 4,500 armed men and seven pieces of artillery. At Drywood, about fifteen miles east of Fort Siate name of the Swamp Fox. General Price found it not only impossible to remain in Lexington, or elsewhere on the Missouri river, but difficult to retreat. General Fremont, who was in command of the department of the West, was moving with a largfrom the west, consisting of regular troops from Fort Leavenworth and Kansas volunteers, and troops were crossing the Missouri river at every available point to assist in the effort to crush him. Under these circumstances it was necessary for him
Blue Mills, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
d Pearce return to Arkansas Federal defeat at Drywood Price Invests the Federal works at Lexington the moving breastworks Mulligan Surrenders an affair at Blue Mills General Thompson and his operations Price compelled to retreat the legislature at Neosho Passes an act of secession members of the Confederate Congress chy's fight at Lexington, while General Price was camped at the fair grounds awaiting the arrival of his camp and ammunition trains, a spirited affair occurred at Blue Mills, about thirty miles above Lexington. General Price learned that about 2,000 Kansas jayhawkers, under Lane and Montgomery, and a considerable force of regular cPrice sent Gen. David R. Atchison, at one time president of the United States Senate, to meet the Missourians and hurry them forward. They reached the river at Blue Mills first, and all but 500 had crossed on the ferryboat. While these 500 were waiting for an opportunity to cross, the enemy came upon them, and there was nothing
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Ky., and with their batteries controlled the navigation of the Mississippi river. To strengthen their position a Confederate force, under General Pillow, occupied the opposite bank of the river in Missouri. Col. U. S. Grant was sent with a brigade of Illinois troops to dislodge them. At first the Federals gained some advantages, but the Confederates being reinforced Grant was compelled to seek the protection of the guns of his boats, and under their cover reembarked his men and returned to Cairo. At Osceola the reorganization of the State Guard into the Confederate service was begun. The men, as a general thing, were 10th to make the change. They had become attached to the State organization. They went into it a mob and had been transformed through it into an army of veterans. Without arms, or uniforms, or tents, or transportation, or equipage of any kind, they had made campaigns, fought battles and won victories. They had never been defeated. They had supplied themselves w
Fredericktown (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
cturer of manifestoes and bulletins at his own game—and not only that, but made him believe he was threatened by a force of at least 10,000 men. General Thompson was of material assistance to General Price by keeping a considerable Federal force engaged in watching him. A good many times the Federals thought they had him surrounded, but he always outwitted them or broke through their lines, and a few days afterward saluted them with a characteristic proclamation. At Grand River and near Fredericktown he maneuvered a small body of men in the face of a force of the enemy ten times as large as his own so skillfully as to accomplish his purpose and get away scot-free. His shiftiness and success in getting out of tight places gave him the appropriate name of the Swamp Fox. General Price found it not only impossible to remain in Lexington, or elsewhere on the Missouri river, but difficult to retreat. General Fremont, who was in command of the department of the West, was moving with a
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Chapter 7: Sigel Retreats to Rolla McCulloch and Pearce return to Arkansas Federal defeat at Drywood Price Invests the Federal works at Lexington the moving breastworks Mulligan Surrenders an affair at Blue Mills General Thompson and his operations Price compelled to retreat the legislature at Neosho Passes an act of secession members of the Confederate Congress chosen Fremont's bodyguard defeated at Springfield Hunter Succeeds Fremont and Retreats reorganization of tisting of 400 heavily laden wagons, a part of their load being $250,000 in gold taken from the branch State bank at Springfield. The remainder of the army moved the same night. The day after the battle General Mc-Culloch withdrew his troops to Arkansas, the Arkansans returned to their own State and General Price, with the State Guard, took possession of Springfield and went to work recruiting, organizing and drilling his army. Some of the men with him had not enlisted. They were organized af
Drywood (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Chapter 7: Sigel Retreats to Rolla McCulloch and Pearce return to Arkansas Federal defeat at Drywood Price Invests the Federal works at Lexington the moving breastworks Mulligan Surrenders an affair at Blue Mills General Thompson and his operations Price compelled to retreat the legislature at Neosho Passes an act of secession members of the Confederate Congress chosen Fremont's bodyguard defeated at Springfield Hunter Succeeds Fremont and Retreats reorganization of d his officers persevered, and at length the unwieldy mass assumed coherence and form. In less than a month Price was able to move in the direction of the Missouri river with a force of about 4,500 armed men and seven pieces of artillery. At Drywood, about fifteen miles east of Fort Scott in Kansas, he encountered several thousand Kansas jayhawkers, under Gen. James H. Lane, and routed them. From there he marched in the direction of Lexington, which was held by a brigade of Irishmen, a re
Rolla, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Chapter 7: Sigel Retreats to Rolla McCulloch and Pearce return to Arkansas Federal defeat at Drywood Price Invests the Federal works at Lexington the moving breastworks Mulligan Surrenders an affair at Blue Mills General Thompson and his operations Price compelled to retreat the legislature at Neosho Passes aof Lyon, turned the command over to Sigel, who was supposed to be the ranking officer. Sigel, after consultation with the other officers, determined to retreat to Rolla, and at once moved out with a strong escort and the army train, consisting of 400 heavily laden wagons, a part of their load being $250,000 in gold taken from the who succeeded him in the command, found the army so demoralized and so unfit for active service, that, with no force threatening him, he retreated precipitately to Rolla. As soon as Hunter left, Price occupied Springfield again, and a little later moved northward to Osceola. The battle of Belmont, which was fought in the extreme
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