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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rkansas would be surely disposed of. As to west Louisiana, Smith was without fear. General Taylor, the campaign now striking the rivets from West Louisiana. Cornay, who had kept his cannoneers alwae preferred to fall, his face to the foe. Louisiana, recalling his truth and their constancy, shmit Richard Taylor, Liberator of Confederate Louisiana, to his fame. General Banks found in his S. Canby. General Canby did no fighting in Louisiana For that, Mansfield and Pleasant Hill had amother campaign on the Red river. With other Louisiana troops reported there, was the Seventh cavalalion; Col. Frank P. Powers' Mississippi and Louisiana cavalry. The First Louisiana heavy artillerginia, or teaching Banks the art of war in West Louisiana. On May 8, 1865, he surrendered to GeneraCitronelle, 40 miles north of Mobile. North Louisiana, when freed by Richard Taylor, one of herto the author, had better war-governors than Louisiana had from 1861-65. One, Thomas Overton Moore,[6 more...]
Marksville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
t ardent in spirit. Our gunners handled their pieces with coolness and precision. By this time the rear guard was getting hurried. Alexandria, in the retreat from Mansfield, had been burned. The burning of the town was stoutly ascribed by the Federals to accident. After doing this mischief the enemy attempted to leave the city by the Bayou Boeuf road. Here stood Polignac to check them. Foiled on that road they repeated the effort on the Red river road. On May 15th Wharton was at Marksville to fight them. At this point ensued a brilliant cannonade which resembled war. Polignac, still with Mouton's superb but now skeleton division, found it impossible to stop the retreat of four brigades supported by a detachment of the Thirteenth army corps. While he remained, however, he held his ground sturdily, withdrawing only when it suited him—true Frenchman that he was—with drums beating and fifes playing a fanfare of defiance. From this on the Federals constantly retreated and co
Cloutierville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Chapter 15: The retreat of Banks Taylor's force reduced Walker and Churchill sent against Steele Natchitoches and Cloutierville Yellow Bayou the last battle Louisianians at Mobile Gibson's Farewell address surrender of General Taylor. Taylor had camped on the battle ground of Pleasant Hill. The same night Gen. Kirby Smith joined him for consultation. A jar of plan at once manifested itself between the two commanders. The question arose of borrowing some of Taylor's viMary's. To her, when other men slunk from her side in peril and shame, he and they stood as true as dial to sun! Taylor was true to his creed, told in words as simply strong as valor: I shall fight the enemy wherever I shall find him. At Cloutierville, not having force enough to impede the retreat with main strength, he fell back upon the trap which he had planned to set at Monett's ferry. He had, in the chase, chanced into that very road skirting the impassable swamp of which he had drea
Citronelle (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
and her honor. As soldiers you have been among the bravest and most steadfast, and as citizens be law-abiding, peaceable and industrious. You have not surrendered and will never surrender your self-respect and love of country. Taylor, in his new department, without a strong army, was as much a problem in the field as he had been when with Stonewall Jackson in the valley of Virginia, or teaching Banks the art of war in West Louisiana. On May 8, 1865, he surrendered to General Canby at Citronelle, 40 miles north of Mobile. North Louisiana, when freed by Richard Taylor, one of her sons, from the invader's chains, stood erect among her children. The shackles had fallen from the once stately limbs, now withered by their rust. In her chair of state sat Henry Watkins Allen, a Paladin who had won spurs of gold; a citizen spotless in chivalry; a veteran weak in body, yet counting it all glory to suffer for his State. No Confederate State, it seems to the author, had better war-gove
Yellow Bayou (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Chapter 15: The retreat of Banks Taylor's force reduced Walker and Churchill sent against Steele Natchitoches and Cloutierville Yellow Bayou the last battle Louisianians at Mobile Gibson's Farewell address surrender of General Taylor. Taylor had camped on the battle ground of Pleasant Hill. The same night s playing a fanfare of defiance. From this on the Federals constantly retreated and constantly resisted, yet always fighting with numbers on their side. At Yellow bayou, May 18th, near the Atchafalaya, the haven where they would be, Wharton, like a wolf-dog, was at them again, attacking them fiercely. All the enemy had crosses over rural Louisiana. Of this quiet, Taylor, who was there, wrote twelve years after the surrender of Louisiana, as of his own knowledge: From the action of Yellow Bayou to the close of the war not a gun was fired in the Trans-Mississippi department. More even than her Beauregard, Taylor had fought for his native State on he
Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
be surely disposed of. As to west Louisiana, Smith was without fear. General Taylor, who had routed Banks, would take care of him. Smith and Taylor went to Shreveport together, and with them marched Walker's and Churchill's divisions, but at Shreveport Smith changed his mind. He suddenly decided himself to go after Steele, on the expedition in Arkansas, which engaged him for some time. From Shreveport, therefore, Taylor set out to hunt up the fleeing column of Banks, which he struck first at Natchitoches on April 22d, defeated his enemy and pursued him with daily marching and fighting. Always trusting to catch up with the foe, his fighters, eager ars of Gen. S. B. Buckner, lately assigned to the district of Western Louisiana. The Crescent regiment was also in that vicinity, and the Third Louisiana was at Shreveport. At a later date there was a considerable concentration of troops in apprehension of another campaign on the Red river. With other Louisiana troops reported t
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
two commanders. The question arose of borrowing some of Taylor's victorious troops. Smith was anxious to utilize such valuable material in his efforts to clear Arkansas of Steele. On his side Taylor was eager to keep on chasing Banks with his victorious army. Well acquainted with the peculiar features of the country, he had aling through with Steele, he would still have his trusty army to finish with Banks. To this Smith agreed, the more willingly because, between the two, Steele in Arkansas would be surely disposed of. As to west Louisiana, Smith was without fear. General Taylor, who had routed Banks, would take care of him. Smith and Taylor wen them marched Walker's and Churchill's divisions, but at Shreveport Smith changed his mind. He suddenly decided himself to go after Steele, on the expedition in Arkansas, which engaged him for some time. From Shreveport, therefore, Taylor set out to hunt up the fleeing column of Banks, which he struck first at Natchitoches on Ap
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
he Seventh cavalry. Vincent's brigade held the Confederate front toward Opelousas. (Federal reports.) After the collapse of Banks' expedition up the river, Richard Taylor was appointed by President Davis to the command of the department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. This department included the district of the Gulf, Maj.-Gen. Dabney H. Maury; district of North Alabama, Brig.-Gen. P. D. Roddey; district of Central Alabama, Brig.-Gen. D. W. Adams; district of Mississippi and Central Alabama, Brig.-Gen. D. W. Adams; district of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Maj.-Gen. Franklin Gardner; the fortified city of Mobile on the south, and the invincible remnant of the cavalry corps of N. B. Forrest on the north. The return for his department November 20, 1864, shows the following Louisiana troops included: In Maury's command—Twenty-second regiment infantry, brigade of Gen. Alpheus Baker. In Gardners command, brigade of Gen. George B. Hodge-First cavalry, Col. John S. Scott; Third cavalry; Col. Daniel Gober's mounted infantry; Maj. Freder
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
forts to clear Arkansas of Steele. On his side Taylor was eager to keep on chasing Banks with his victorious army. Well acquainted with the peculiar features of the country, he had already planned to bag Banks somewhere between Cane river and Red river. He had hit upon a narrow road crossing a distance of about seven miles. This road skirted an impassable swamp. Smith's special design was to take from Taylor's little force Walker's and Churchill's divisions. Naturally Taylor demurred to th news of Banks' defeat. A sorry ending to the dream of the joint triumph of army and navy—his army fleeing, and the fleet, that fleet so much trusted in, so hopefully associated with the proud beginnings of his wrecked campaign, scurrying down Red river, painfully eyeing the banks, and none too sure of saving itself from the dangerous union of low water and hostile batteries. On April 26th an event, brilliant in execution, aided in annihilating one gunboat and one transport. Lieutenant-Colon
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
try, brigade of Gen. Alpheus Baker. In Gardners command, brigade of Gen. George B. Hodge-First cavalry, Col. John S. Scott; Third cavalry; Col. Daniel Gober's mounted infantry; Maj. Frederick N. Ogden's cavalry battalion; Col. Frank P. Powers' Mississippi and Louisiana cavalry. The First Louisiana heavy artillery was at Mobile, and Maj. Washington Marks was in command of the water batteries. When Mobile, so long defiant, was threatened by formidable land forces in the spring of 1865, Forts Morgan and Gaines having fallen in the previous August, Gibson's Louisiana brigade reported to Gen. St. John Liddell in command. The First, Sixteenth and Twentieth regiments were at that time consolidated under Lieutenant-Colonel Lindsay; the Fourth battalion and Twenty-fifth regiment under Colonel Zacharie; the Nineteenth was commanded by Maj. Camp Flournoy, and the Sharpshooters by Col. F. L. Campbell. The Fourth, Thirteenth and Thirtieth were also consolidated. Capt. Cuthbert H. Slocomb's
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