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ation, of all others, which he knew best how to fill at once with honor to himself and to his State's advantage. On the 11th of May General Banks was relieved, at his own request, by Maj.-Gen. R. S. Canby. General Canby did no fighting in Louisiana For that, Mansfield and Pleasant Hill had amply provided. In January, 1865, it appeared that the brigade of Gen. Allen Thomas, consisting of the Seventeenth, Twenty-sixth, Twentysev-enth, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-first Louisiana infantry, Weatherly's battalion (late Miles' legion), Wade's light artillery and acompany of heavy artillery, was at Alexandria, then the headquarters of Gen. S. B. Buckner, lately assigned to the district of Western Louisiana. The Crescent regiment was also in that vicinity, and the Third Louisiana was at Shreveport. At a later date there was a considerable concentration of troops in apprehension of another campaign on the Red river. With other Louisiana troops reported there, was the Seventh cavalry. Vi
f Banks Taylor's force reduced Walker and Churchill sent against Steele Natchitoches and Cloutierville Yellow Bayou the last battle Lou utilize such valuable material in his efforts to clear Arkansas of Steele. On his side Taylor was eager to keep on chasing Banks with his vimise was effected. Smith promised to return at once the troops, if Steele retreated. At that, Taylor himself offered to lead the advance, thinking, after getting through with Steele, he would still have his trusty army to finish with Banks. To this Smith agreed, the more willingly because, between the two, Steele in Arkansas would be surely disposed of. As to west Louisiana, Smith was without fear. General Taylor, whort Smith changed his mind. He suddenly decided himself to go after Steele, on the expedition in Arkansas, which engaged him for some time. Fl-de-sac had been irretrievably spoiled. Banks, always looking for Steele, still belated, and never having studied military traps, had uncons
John A. Wharton (search for this): chapter 15
praise for their gallantry, patient endurance of fatigue, and never-failing enthusiasm. Gen. John A. Wharton wrote to Bee, June 30th, From an examination of the ground, and from a full knowledge of check them. Foiled on that road they repeated the effort on the Red river road. On May 15th Wharton was at Marksville to fight them. At this point ensued a brilliant cannonade which resembled waon their side. At Yellow bayou, May 18th, near the Atchafalaya, the haven where they would be, Wharton, like a wolf-dog, was at them again, attacking them fiercely. All the enemy had crossed except A. J. Smith's Vicksburg veterans. Unfortunately, Wharton forgot that his right wing was that resting on the bayou. In order to check Smith's crossing, he had only to mass on his right wing. Instetwo months before in pride, it now closed in disaster. Bee's blunder cost Taylor Banks' army. Wharton's blunder cost him Smith's division. With the Federals on the thither side of the Atchafalaya,
St. John Liddell (search for this): chapter 15
s was in command of the water batteries. When Mobile, so long defiant, was threatened by formidable land forces in the spring of 1865, Forts Morgan and Gaines having fallen in the previous August, Gibson's Louisiana brigade reported to Gen. St. John Liddell in command. The First, Sixteenth and Twentieth regiments were at that time consolidated under Lieutenant-Colonel Lindsay; the Fourth battalion and Twenty-fifth regiment under Colonel Zacharie; the Nineteenth was commanded by Maj. Camp Fer Capt. R. C. Bond; and at battery Missouri, Capt. James Gibney, were Companies E and K, Twenty-second regiment, and Holmes' light artillery. General Gibson was assigned in the latter part of March to command of the defenses of Spanish Fort, Liddell taking charge at Blakely. He had his brigade, about 500 rifles under Colonel Campbell, Holtzclaw's and Ector's brigades, about 500, and. Col. I. W. Patton's artillery, 360 strong. Gibson, on taking command, found that be had an enormous amount
Taylor had ordered Bee, a valued lieutenant, to hold the ferry before the arrival of the enemy. Apparently, Bee misapprehended precisely why he was to be at the crossing. Before the Federals appeared, he had already withdrawn his troops from the gate. General Bee, who reported that his 2,000 men were in line under seven hours continuous fire before giving up the ferry, said in his defense: That I was not successful was because success was impossible. ... I claim for my troops (Gould's, Wood's, Terrell's, Liken's, Yager's, Myer's and Vincent's cavalry) the highest praise for their gallantry, patient endurance of fatigue, and never-failing enthusiasm. Gen. John A. Wharton wrote to Bee, June 30th, From an examination of the ground, and from a full knowledge of your force and that of the enemy, I am satisfied that you could not have maintained yourself at Monett's ferry. The enemy, seeing the door Wide open, did not hesitate to march through. This did not escape Taylor's eye. Noti
John S. Scott (search for this): chapter 15
ict of Central Alabama, Brig.-Gen. D. W. Adams; district of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Maj.-Gen. Franklin Gardner; the fortified city of Mobile on the south, and the invincible remnant of the cavalry corps of N. B. Forrest on the north. The return for his department November 20, 1864, shows the following Louisiana troops included: In Maury's command—Twenty-second regiment infantry, brigade of Gen. Alpheus Baker. In Gardners command, brigade of Gen. George B. Hodge-First cavalry, Col. John S. Scott; Third cavalry; Col. Daniel Gober's mounted infantry; Maj. Frederick N. Ogden's cavalry battalion; Col. Frank P. Powers' Mississippi and Louisiana cavalry. The First Louisiana heavy artillery was at Mobile, and Maj. Washington Marks was in command of the water batteries. When Mobile, so long defiant, was threatened by formidable land forces in the spring of 1865, Forts Morgan and Gaines having fallen in the previous August, Gibson's Louisiana brigade reported to Gen. St. John Lidde
Cuthbert H. Slocomb (search for this): chapter 15
f 1865, Forts Morgan and Gaines having fallen in the previous August, Gibson's Louisiana brigade reported to Gen. St. John Liddell in command. The First, Sixteenth and Twentieth regiments were at that time consolidated under Lieutenant-Colonel Lindsay; the Fourth battalion and Twenty-fifth regiment under Colonel Zacharie; the Nineteenth was commanded by Maj. Camp Flournoy, and the Sharpshooters by Col. F. L. Campbell. The Fourth, Thirteenth and Thirtieth were also consolidated. Capt. Cuthbert H. Slocomb's Washington artillery was there, commanded by Lieutenant Chalaron, under Col. Melancthon Smith, commanding the right wing of the defenses. Fenner's battery, Lieutenant Cluverius, and Captains John H. Lamon's and Edward G. Butler's companies of the First heavy artillery were assigned to the left wing, under Colonel Fuller. At battery McIntosh, under Maj. W. C. Capers, were Companies A and D of the First heavy artillery; at battery Gladden, Companies B and G, under Capt. R. C. Bon
Nathaniel P. Banks (search for this): chapter 15
Chapter 15: The retreat of Banks Taylor's force reduced Walker and Churchill sent agn his side Taylor was eager to keep on chasing Banks with his victorious army. Well acquainted witould still have his trusty army to finish with Banks. To this Smith agreed, the more willingly bec without fear. General Taylor, who had routed Banks, would take care of him. Smith and Taylor waylor set out to hunt up the fleeing column of Banks, which he struck first at Natchitoches on Apriunboats coming down, frightened at the news of Banks' defeat. A sorry ending to the dream of the j otherwise fortunate and victorious pursuit of Banks. Cornay had proved an officer of rare promiseis cul-de-sac had been irretrievably spoiled. Banks, always looking for Steele, still belated, andrates continued forcing a considerable part of Banks' army to confront it, meeting the part pluckiln May 19, 1864, with haste. Thus, there where Banks' campaign had opened two months before in prid[1 more...]
J. A. Chalaron (search for this): chapter 15
Gibson's Louisiana brigade reported to Gen. St. John Liddell in command. The First, Sixteenth and Twentieth regiments were at that time consolidated under Lieutenant-Colonel Lindsay; the Fourth battalion and Twenty-fifth regiment under Colonel Zacharie; the Nineteenth was commanded by Maj. Camp Flournoy, and the Sharpshooters by Col. F. L. Campbell. The Fourth, Thirteenth and Thirtieth were also consolidated. Capt. Cuthbert H. Slocomb's Washington artillery was there, commanded by Lieutenant Chalaron, under Col. Melancthon Smith, commanding the right wing of the defenses. Fenner's battery, Lieutenant Cluverius, and Captains John H. Lamon's and Edward G. Butler's companies of the First heavy artillery were assigned to the left wing, under Colonel Fuller. At battery McIntosh, under Maj. W. C. Capers, were Companies A and D of the First heavy artillery; at battery Gladden, Companies B and G, under Capt. R. C. Bond; and at battery Missouri, Capt. James Gibney, were Companies E and K
Melancthon Smith (search for this): chapter 15
eported to Gen. St. John Liddell in command. The First, Sixteenth and Twentieth regiments were at that time consolidated under Lieutenant-Colonel Lindsay; the Fourth battalion and Twenty-fifth regiment under Colonel Zacharie; the Nineteenth was commanded by Maj. Camp Flournoy, and the Sharpshooters by Col. F. L. Campbell. The Fourth, Thirteenth and Thirtieth were also consolidated. Capt. Cuthbert H. Slocomb's Washington artillery was there, commanded by Lieutenant Chalaron, under Col. Melancthon Smith, commanding the right wing of the defenses. Fenner's battery, Lieutenant Cluverius, and Captains John H. Lamon's and Edward G. Butler's companies of the First heavy artillery were assigned to the left wing, under Colonel Fuller. At battery McIntosh, under Maj. W. C. Capers, were Companies A and D of the First heavy artillery; at battery Gladden, Companies B and G, under Capt. R. C. Bond; and at battery Missouri, Capt. James Gibney, were Companies E and K, Twenty-second regiment, an
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