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Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
apter 24: The battle panorama at Fredericksburg the Louisiana artillery at Marye's Hill defeat of the Federals than the battle at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. McClellan had begun a appointed to the command. The field of Fredericksburg was singularly open as a fighting ground. ahannock, extending far to the left toward Fredericksburg. Two miles or less back from the river weor safety. During the night of the 15th Fredericksburg was evacuated by the Federals. Burnside hugh which it had just passed the Horror of Fredericksburg. Horror, most truly! Heros Van Borcke, Suffolk), hastening by forced marches from Fredericksburg, was ready to meet him. After barely feelietiring into the Wilderness, facing toward Fredericksburg. Here the Confederate advance under Jacksrders from General Lee, left him behind at Fredericksburg to guard the valorous town. It was no ingromise as of honor, was cut short. At this Fredericksburg battle the loss of Hays' brigade was 63 ki[1 more...]
Austerlitz (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
red only the prelude of the mighty opening orchestra. Lee on the same evening (May 1st) called a council of his corps commanders. Jackson, who had led the assault of the day and had seen its futility, was ready with his plan for the next day's battle. Here we see the one opportunity of Jackson's military life. He for the first and only time outlined a plan for the movements of the army of which he was only a lieutenant. It was as though Lannes had laid before Napoleon the scheme of Austerlitz. Jackson had fully recognized the impossibility of a direct assault on the Federal front or left, by reason of the broken ground. He proposed to sweep with a rapid movement around Hooker's front, attack on his right flank, taking him in reverse, and cut him off from the United States ford. This plan was at once adopted by General Lee, and the details were left to Jackson. Early the next morning Stonewall opened the movement. He was eager to play once again his victorious flanking game
Plank (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
nded. On May 2d and 3d the Second Louisiana brigade, now led by Brig.-Gen. Francis T. Nicholls, was to be found on the Plank road, either resting on the highway or deployed along it toward the Chancellor house. Around Chancellorsville the battle of the enemy's masses to envelope, anaconda-like, our slenderer lines; at other times, utilizing heavy guns to clear the Plank road of our men. The artillery was specially destructive on Saturday, the 2d. About 9:30 p. m. the head of Nicholls' brigade halted on the Plank road about half a mile from Chancellor's house, and the road was swept by a destructive artillery fire. It was here that the gallant Nicholls had the misfortune to be seriously wounded, a shell tearing his left leg, necessial officers of the command. Capt. C. Thomas, of the Guard artillery, with a section of rifle guns, was placed near the Plank road, opposite to the enemy's works, under Major McIntosh. With an enfilading fire the Guard succeeded in dislodging the
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ty of Jackson's military life. He for the first and only time outlined a plan for the movements of the army of which he was only a lieutenant. It was as though Lannes had laid before Napoleon the scheme of Austerlitz. Jackson had fully recognized the impossibility of a direct assault on the Federal front or left, by reason of the broken ground. He proposed to sweep with a rapid movement around Hooker's front, attack on his right flank, taking him in reverse, and cut him off from the United States ford. This plan was at once adopted by General Lee, and the details were left to Jackson. Early the next morning Stonewall opened the movement. He was eager to play once again his victorious flanking game. He knew that to pass Hooker's entire front was most hazardous. The broken country, however, greatly aided him. The route, skirting the edge of the front, sometimes going through it, sometimes hiding itself away in small by-roads, was an all-day's plodding. To make this flank atta
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
lled the gladness following Antietam; for the South, it had restored confidence. Reckless Burnside was replaced by Fighting Joe Hooker. Hooker began well. While Lee was watching him from his old heights back of Fredericksburg Hooker had taken a march on him, massing 40,000 men on his left flank at Chancellorsville. Here Fighting Joe, forgetting his nickname won by daring, rested, undecided, one full wasted day. When at last prepared to advance, Lee (without Longstreet, who was absent at Suffolk), hastening by forced marches from Fredericksburg, was ready to meet him. After barely feeling Lee, Hooker tempted him by retiring into the Wilderness, facing toward Fredericksburg. Here the Confederate advance under Jackson attacked him. The expected happened. In the dense thickets, turned everywhere into abatis and bristling at every avenue of approach with artillery, Hooker was practically impregnable. Lee soon drew back from the purposeless contest. The heavy guns on this day, both
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
d. With those who held that post of honor was D'Aquin's Louisiana Guard artillery, of Jackson's corps, ready for battle. The company occupied the heights at Shepherdstown, and, at a severe loss in killed and wounded, forbade the enemy's free passage of the ford. All through the night the crossing of the river was going on. Night movements mostly partake of the confusion of the darkness, consequently there was much disorder at the ford. With the disorder went its mate, slaughter. Frigid Maryland cost the army no morale. Once having got over the disturbing, because wholly novel effects of a retreat in force, the army's bugles rang as cheerily again in Virginia as on that day when they had summoned it to new and gayer fields across the border. The Confederate army was safely gathered back into Virginia and marshalled to fight the great battle which followed Sharpsburg. No battle in our civil war was more clearly a defeat of the Federals than the battle at Fredericksburg, Decemb
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
e prelude of the mighty opening orchestra. Lee on the same evening (May 1st) called a council of his corps commanders. Jackson, who had led the assault of the day and had seen its futility, was ready with his plan for the next day's battle. Herhe army of which he was only a lieutenant. It was as though Lannes had laid before Napoleon the scheme of Austerlitz. Jackson had fully recognized the impossibility of a direct assault on the Federal front or left, by reason of the broken ground.ding. To make this flank attack a success it needed, above all, to be a complete surprise. Once, at Catherine furnace, Jackson found himself in plain view. An assault, hot while it lasted, was made upon his rear. As the widening road, however, binto the heavy works around Chancellorsville. Early the same night, while preparing for a new and more resolute attack, Jackson received his death wound at the hands of his friends. Chancellorsville was the fact—Marye's hill was an episode. On
Sligo (Irish Republic) (search for this): chapter 24
e field of Fredericksburg was singularly open as a fighting ground. As noted by skilled observers, its peculiar situation, with hills in the rear and the river in the foreground, made it a panorama of a battlefield rarely equaled for clearness of observation. In its absence of woods it appeared more like a battleground in war-scarred Belgium. Along the Rappahannock was the gray town (young when the revolution was growing) crowded with troops in glittering line of battle. To the right, at Sligo; to the left, at Amarett farm, were still other masses. Up to 10 a. m. the view of the field had been impaired by a thick fog, which disappearing, the army lines became visible in the plain between us and the Rappahannock, extending far to the left toward Fredericksburg. Two miles or less back from the river were our lines, defending earthworks. Burnside had at first sat down at Falmouth on the north side of the Rappahannock. This was an unwise move, since he should have anticipated Lee
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
g Hooker had taken a march on him, massing 40,000 men on his left flank at Chancellorsville. Here Fighting Joe, forgetting his nickname won by daring, rested, undecishell, and sent its pieces spinning helplessly into the heavy works around Chancellorsville. Early the same night, while preparing for a new and more resolute attack, Jackson received his death wound at the hands of his friends. Chancellorsville was the fact—Marye's hill was an episode. On May 2d and 3d Hays' brigade was, and was not, at Chancellorsville. Early, in whose division he was, had, under orders from General Lee, left him behind at Fredericksburg to guard the valorous town. Itg on the highway or deployed along it toward the Chancellor house. Around Chancellorsville the battle swayed during the two days, at times fiercely, with a resolute eaking and dispersing it. This column was said to be Meagher's brigade. Chancellorsville, with all its glory, bore one broad stream of crape for the mighty soldier
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
pearing, the army lines became visible in the plain between us and the Rappahannock, extending far to the left toward Fredericksburg. Two miles or less back from the river were our lines, defending earthworks. Burnside had at first sat down at Falmouth on the north side of the Rappahannock. This was an unwise move, since he should have anticipated Lee by taking possession of the heights back of that town. General Lee answered his blunder by making triple defenses. At Marye's hill the Washingher's brigade. Chancellorsville, with all its glory, bore one broad stream of crape for the mighty soldier who had planned it. His plan, triumphing in the rout of the enemy's right flank, opened the road to Hooker's final retreat to his old Falmouth camps. Throughout the critical third day the watchword was, Remember Jackson. It broke into the multitudinous voices of battle with a note mightier than theirs. Heard the loudest with each victorious advance, it told once again how an army fi
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