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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Springfield (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
deral advance under Curtis battle of Elkhorn Tavern death of McCulloch and McIntosh headquarters at Pocahontas Van Dorn Prepares to Cross the Mississippi the noble women of Arkansas. After the battle of Oak Hills and the occupation of Springfield by the Confederates, General Price, having failed to induce General McCulloch, commanding the Arkansas troops, to unite with him, made a forward movement toward the Missouri river with his Missouri command, directing his march against Lexington subsequently received, it is believed that this body of troops was General Sigel's division, numbering from 5,000 to 7,000 men. Colonel Gates, pressing upon the retreating enemy, engaged his rear guard a short distance beyond the town on the Springfield road. Here, besides the capture of prisoners and a baggage-wagon laden with arms and ammunition, our cavalry killed and wounded several of the enemy and compelled the main body to continue its retreat, pursuing it until dark. The other regim
Elkhorn Tavern (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
by a long and toilsome circuit, it is true, but well in the enemy's rear, and in an equal position on Pea ridge near Elkhorn tavern, to the north of the enemy. The large trees felled across the roads by Curtis, to block up the approaches on his lefh the commanding general, several miles distant, they were ordered to his assistance. Meanwhile, on the field near Elkhorn tavern, before 2 o'clock, it was evident, Van Dorn reported afterward, that if McCulloch could advance or even maintain his sted, and then fell back before our lines, as with a shout of triumph, Rives' and Gates' regiments dashed onward past Elkhorn tavern, and we stood on the ground where the enemy had formed in the morning. Here, too, Burbridge's regiment halted, aftertle before daylight on the morning of the 8th reached Van Dom, and were disposed to the right and left of the line at Elkhorn tavern. Here, upon the renewal of the battle on the 8th, the greater part of the troops remained inactive, while the cannon
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
secretary of war: Sir: I shall return to Arkansas, put my troops in winter quarters soon, and aol. James McIntosh commanding: First regiment Arkansas mounted riflemen (Churchill), 845; Second Arkine was advanced. Forward! for Missouri, for Arkansas, for the States which stood for manhood and ein rear of Colonel Burbridge's command, three Arkansas regiments, commanded by Col. Thos. J. Churchi to the command of the Indian country west of Arkansas and north of Texas, and the Indian regiments e about 20,000, maybe more; that the enemy in Arkansas had fallen back to Springfield. On the 17th Rust was ordered to assume command of the lower Arkansas from Clarksville to its mouth, and of Whit order. General Price was greatly beloved in Arkansas. His natural amiability, his unassuming, fat girls he took upon his knee. The women of Arkansas, in their devotion to the cause of their husbrsed their sick and buried their dead. In north Arkansas, harried as it was by the armies up to 186[8 more...]
James R. Shaler (search for this): chapter 4
action. My men advanced in one unbroken line. We met the foe. For a few seconds he resisted, and then fell back before our lines, as with a shout of triumph, Rives' and Gates' regiments dashed onward past Elkhorn tavern, and we stood on the ground where the enemy had formed in the morning. Here, too, Burbridge's regiment halted, after forcing the enemy's position on the right, and came into line, having Lindsay's battalion and a portion of Frost's division, under Cols. Colton Greene and Shaler, on his left and resting on the Elkhorn buildings. Two pieces of the enemy's cannon, with an artillery camp, commissary and sutler's stores, fell into our hands, captured by the charge of Gates' and Rives' regiments. A renewal of the enemy's fire by a battery placed in position on the road was answered by Guibor's battery, of Frost's brigade. For more than thirty minutes we contested the position against a brisk fire of artillery, when, General Price having forced the left wing of the enem
H. G. Bunn (search for this): chapter 4
nded by a volley from the enemy, thus nobly offering up his life for his country. Capt. Josephus C. Tyson, leading the van of his company in the same charge, was severely wounded in both legs, a few paces from the cannon. Capt. F. J. Erwin, early in the action, was shot through the body and I was thus deprived of the services of one of my most efficient officers. Capts. J. B. McCulloch and Augustus Kile did much to sustain the men by their intrepidity during the entire engagement. Lieut. H. G. Bunn, my adjutant, rendered efficient service during the whole engagement, and was wounded on the head by the explosion of a shell, as we were retiring from the field. Capt. W. J. Ferguson, my quartermaster, who acted as my aide during the whole engagement, conducted himself with marked ability and intrepidity. Mr. Wm. Garland participated as a volunteer during the entire engagement and proved himself a valiant soldier, rendering great assistance. Col. John T. Hughes, in his report, d
John Jumper (search for this): chapter 4
iting for McCulloch's demonstration against the enemy's front McCulloch was necessarily delayed in arraying the disorganized detachments which choked the narrow roads— General Pike with his Choctaws, Cherokees and Creeks, Stand Watie's regiment on foot, D. N. McIntosh's Creeks on foot, Drew's Choctaws, pony-mounted, and a squadron, as General Pike named it, of mounted whites —in all only 1,000 men. Gen. Douglas Cooper's Indian command contained Chilly McIntosh, the Creek war chief, and John Jumper, Boudinot, and other celebrated Cherokees, all of whom had come up late on the 6th. It was about 10:30 a. m., says Col. Evander McNair, of the Fourth Arkansas, on the extreme right of Hebert's (Second) brigade, before that brigade, under the lead of McCulloch, was ordered into action. The brigade was composed of the Arkansas regiments of Colonel McIntosh, Colonel McNair and Colonel Mitchell, Hebert's Third Louisiana, and McRae's battalion. There were nominally attached to the brigade
Frederick Steele (search for this): chapter 4
es, General Price, having failed to induce General McCulloch, commanding the Arkansas troops, to unite with him, made a forward movement toward the Missouri river with his Missouri command, directing his march against Lexington, via Warrensburg. There he was joined by Thomas A. Harris, whom he had appointed brigadier-general in the State Guard. General Harris, upon his little staff of three men, had recruited a force of 2,700. Price besieged Lexington with the forces under Generals Harris, Steele, Parsons, Rains, McBride, Slack, Congreve, Jackson and Atchison, and on September 20, 1861, after 54 hours incessant attack, he was successful, capturing 3,500 prisoners, 3,000 stands of arms, 5 pieces of artillery and 2 mortars, 750 horses and $100,000 worth of commissary stores, besides $900,000 in money, which had been taken from the Bank of Lexington by the besieged (and was now restored at once), together with Colonels Mulligan, Marshall, Van Horn, Peabody, Gowen, White and 118 commissi
J. L. Whitfield (search for this): chapter 4
ansas infantry, 930; Rector's Arkansas infantry, 544; Hebert's Third Louisiana infantry, 739; Third Texas cavalry, 796; Whitfield's battalion Texas cavalry, 297; Brooks' battalion cavalry, 316; Gaines' battery, 74; Good's battery, 105; Hart's battertalion, Good's, Hart's and Provence's Arkansas batteries, Gaines' Texas battery, the Third (Greer's) Texas cavalry, and Whitfield's battalion Texas cavalry. The other brigade, called the First brigade, sometimes led by McIntosh, was commanded by Copported by heavy reserves. Having ordered the left of my line to move close to the fence on the left of the woods, and Whitfield's battalion to the support of Burbridge's regiment on the right, I reported the expected advance of the enemy's infantreveral of my men were wounded, but none were killed. Several brave Confederates in Colonel Churchill's regiment and Major Whitfield's Texas battalion were killed, fighting alongside on our left. The battle was conducted upon a daring and masterl
James Hart (search for this): chapter 4
ion Texas cavalry, 297; Brooks' battalion cavalry, 316; Gaines' battery, 74; Good's battery, 105; Hart's battery, 75; Provence's battery, 73; total, 6,052. Grand total of the division, 10,485. Gee's battalion. There were nominally attached to the brigade, Brooks' Arkansas battalion, Good's, Hart's and Provence's Arkansas batteries, Gaines' Texas battery, the Third (Greer's) Texas cavalry, and up to Good's support, but had scarcely unlimbered when Good's battery retired from the ground. Hart's battery was now ordered to take the place vacated by Good. Hart's battery did not prove more sHart's battery did not prove more steady than its predecessor under the enemy's fire, and immediately left the field. [Some of Hart's officers and men were censured in reports, but upon investigation by court-martial, were relieved ofHart's officers and men were censured in reports, but upon investigation by court-martial, were relieved of all censure.] Wade's battery, having exhausted its ammunition and several horses, was now ordered to retire to the rear and replenish its caissons. The position vacated by Wade's battery was supplie
red at once), together with Colonels Mulligan, Marshall, Van Horn, Peabody, Gowen, White and 118 commissioned officers. The Confederates lost only 25 killed and 72 wounded. After this, Price learned that all the forces of the enemy which General Fremont could control were marching against him. Generals Pillow and Hardee had been withdrawn from southeast Missouri. Ammunition, which General Price had arranged to get, was taken charge of by McCulloch, who expressed his want of confidence in o General McCulloch in behalf of a forward movement, and remonstrated with Mr. Benjamin, secretary of war, against inaction at a time when the Federal forces in Missouri were embarrassed by rivalries between commanders, and the fatuous course of Fremont, who was occupied with anticipations of future political campaigns rather than the military duties of the present But General McCulloch seemed to distrust utterly the plans and purposes of General Price. He wrote from Springfield, Mo., Novem
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