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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans).

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ion could be given to raising troops for the Confederate service. It is due to the people of Texas that these embarrassments should be explained in the history of the war. There was no record of the organization of the Texas troops kept in the executive offices of the State, and hence, in writing this history, the principal sources of information were found in the war department at Washington, as follows: 1. A list of Texas Regiments and Battalions in the Confederate Service from 1861 to 1865, from published records. 2. The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was der
e attention could be given to raising troops for the Confederate service. It is due to the people of Texas that these embarrassments should be explained in the history of the war. There was no record of the organization of the Texas troops kept in the executive offices of the State, and hence, in writing this history, the principal sources of information were found in the war department at Washington, as follows: 1. A list of Texas Regiments and Battalions in the Confederate Service from 1861 to 1865, from published records. 2. The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects
June 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1
r part in the war. This was due to two causes: First, a course of political events that placed the chief executive of the State in opposition to the will of the mass of the people in regard to the right and policy of immediate State action; second, being a frontier State, she had first to expel from her borders a large body of Federal troops. These causes which delayed Texas demanded that the first efforts of the people should be made for their removal, and therefore it was near the 1st of June, 1861, before attention could be given to raising troops for the Confederate service. It is due to the people of Texas that these embarrassments should be explained in the history of the war. There was no record of the organization of the Texas troops kept in the executive offices of the State, and hence, in writing this history, the principal sources of information were found in the war department at Washington, as follows: 1. A list of Texas Regiments and Battalions in the Confederate
John G. Walker (search for this): chapter 1
2. The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject,
J. P. Blessington (search for this): chapter 1
the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject, it is hoped that the perus
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject, it is hoped that the perusal of it will exhibit an earnest effort to make the best performance practicable under the circumstances by the author.
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject, it is hoped that the perusal of it will exhibit an earnest effort to make the best performance practicable under the circumstances by the author.
he Democratic party, when nominations were made, soon exhibited a strong influence in county district and State elections. Still another dangerous event was the formation in the North of the Republican party with a platform, as it was regarded in the South, embracing all the leading principles of the Northern States, as held by different portions of their people; they being centralism, federalism, free-soilism and abolitionism, upon which Colonel Fremont ran as a candidate for President in 1856. Though not elected, he received of the popular vote, 1,341,812, and of the presidential electors, 127. This remarkable combination portended danger to all the cherished political principles of Southern Democrats and ultimately to their peculiar industrial institutions; notwithstanding which it was currently reported that if Fremont had been elected an effort would have been made by leading men in Texas for submission to his administration. The political situation was made still more per
Texas in 1860 unfavorable political conditions election of Governor Runnels in 1857 secession and the African slave trade Agitated election of Governor Houston in 1859 his opposition to separate State action. When the crisis was pending in 1860, Texas was in an unfavorable condition, politically, to promptly join her sister Southern States in the movement for secession from the United States. This was not from the lack of Southern sentiment generally pervading the mass of the people of ation, with a chief executive known to be strongly opposed to separate State action as a remedy against Federal wrongs, and a legislature with views not at all in harmony with his on that subject. This was made more manifest during the canvass in 1860 for President, in which the governor's leading friends supported Bell, and the great body of Democrats supported Breckinridge, the Southern Democratic nominee for President. Although the vote was somewhat divided, especially in certain counties i
ly encouraging the sentiment of disunion among the people of Texas. Thus was raised the questions of the right and expediency of secession, which, during 1858 and 1859, up to the time of the general State election, brought out those great debates and discussions by the leading statesmen of Texas, by which the people were thoroughs. These articles were generally quotations and not editorials; still they gave the paper the reputation of favoring the slave trade. In the spring and summer of 1859, a few very prominent men in Texas made speeches in favor of the trade, and they were generally understood to be strongly Southern and particular adherents of the in writing. It was in this way that the imputation was fastened on the State administration that the slave trade was favored by the governor. In the summer of 1859, Gov. H. R. Runnels and Lieut.-Gov. F. R. Lubbock were renominated, when the agitation of these political subjects increased in vigor to the end of the canvass. G
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