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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans).

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Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject, it is hoped that the perusal of it will exhibit an earnest effort to make the best performance practicable under the circumstances by the author.
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject, it is hoped that the perusal of it will exhibit an earnest effort to make the best performance practicable under the circumstances by the author.
J. P. Blessington (search for this): chapter 1
the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject, it is hoped that the perus
John G. Walker (search for this): chapter 1
2. The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was derived from the History of Walker's Division, by J. P. Blessington, from officers and soldiers still living, and from other reliable persons. Information in regard to the government and civil officers of the State has been obtained from the executive offices of the capitol at Austin. The effort, at this late day, to make a consecutive and consistent account of the part taken by Texas and her people in the war between the States has been an arduous and difficult task. While it must fail to do full justice to the subject,
e attention could be given to raising troops for the Confederate service. It is due to the people of Texas that these embarrassments should be explained in the history of the war. There was no record of the organization of the Texas troops kept in the executive offices of the State, and hence, in writing this history, the principal sources of information were found in the war department at Washington, as follows: 1. A list of Texas Regiments and Battalions in the Confederate Service from 1861 to 1865, from published records. 2. The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects
ion could be given to raising troops for the Confederate service. It is due to the people of Texas that these embarrassments should be explained in the history of the war. There was no record of the organization of the Texas troops kept in the executive offices of the State, and hence, in writing this history, the principal sources of information were found in the war department at Washington, as follows: 1. A list of Texas Regiments and Battalions in the Confederate Service from 1861 to 1865, from published records. 2. The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, published by the secretary of war. 3. A statement from the war department of Texas troops in service and in battles in other Southern States. In none of these, however, are stated the original organization of the commands, or the changes of the field officers by promotion or otherwise. These had to be obtained, when practicable, from other sources. Much information on these and other subjects was der
June 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1
r part in the war. This was due to two causes: First, a course of political events that placed the chief executive of the State in opposition to the will of the mass of the people in regard to the right and policy of immediate State action; second, being a frontier State, she had first to expel from her borders a large body of Federal troops. These causes which delayed Texas demanded that the first efforts of the people should be made for their removal, and therefore it was near the 1st of June, 1861, before attention could be given to raising troops for the Confederate service. It is due to the people of Texas that these embarrassments should be explained in the history of the war. There was no record of the organization of the Texas troops kept in the executive offices of the State, and hence, in writing this history, the principal sources of information were found in the war department at Washington, as follows: 1. A list of Texas Regiments and Battalions in the Confederate
Fort Stanwix (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
en as Sumner and Seward. The newspapers were teeming with it from day to day. Mr. Sumner said in the Senate in 1854, To the overthrow of the slave power we are summoned by a double call, one political and the other philanthropic: First, to remove an oppressive tyranny from the national government; and secondly, to open the gates of emancipation in the slave States. Such sentiments continued to be publicly uttered during the year 1858. Senator Seward, in his speeches at Rochester and at Rome, N. Y., presented what he deemed to be the true issue in the political controversy then pending in the United States. That issue he discussed under the following question: Shall the social organization of the North supplant that of the South? and asserted that free labor and slave labor cannot exist together in the Union. This doubtless reflected the real sentiments of his party, of which he was known to be one of the most prominent leaders, as he had been one of its most efficient originator
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
party to make nominations for governor and other executive officers in 1857, when H. R. Runnels was nominated for the office of governor, and F. R. Lubbock for that of lieutenant-governor. One of those events was when, upon the passage of the Kansas and Nebraska bill in Congress, in 1854, Senator Houston of Texas voted against the bill, with the Northern Free Soilers, and Senator Rusk of Texas voted for the bill, with the Democratic and Whig senators of the South, except John Bell, of Tennessee, who also voted against it. This, with other votes given by Senator Houston, caused a strong opposition to be made against him politically in Texas. That, however, did not prevent him from openly and vigorously defending his course in the Senate, which drew to him large numbers of adherents, who became alienated from the regularly organized Democratic party. Another political event was the advent, from the North into Texas, of the Know Nothing order, a secret organization, afterward ca
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nfavorable condition, politically, to promptly join her sister Southern States in the movement for secession from the United States. This was not from the lack of Southern sentiment generally pervading the mass of the people of the State, but from political differences that had resulted from the course of events previous to that time. The great struggle in the United States for the annexation of Texas to the Union exhibited parties in the Northern States, formed or forming, antagonistic to the institutions of the South, and to their extension to other territory to become a part of the United States. The fact that the Democratic party, in control of the government, admitted Texas into the Union, caused the great body of the people er and at Rome, N. Y., presented what he deemed to be the true issue in the political controversy then pending in the United States. That issue he discussed under the following question: Shall the social organization of the North supplant that of t
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