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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 10: A famous naval Exploit capture of Federal vessels off Sabine Pass a lady's description engagement at Lighthouse, Sabine Pass defense of St. Joseph's island. The capture of the United States warship Morning Light and schooner Velocity, 30 miles off Sabine pass, January 21, 1863, by Confederates on the two steamboats, the Josiah H. Bell and the Uncle Ben, was one of the most extraordinary and hazardous naval exploits during the war, though of small proportions comevil bravery of his followers, was obtained from the lips of men who were with him, who shared his danger, who admired his courage, and who were ready to risk their lives at his bidding. The engagement to which I refer was the capture of the United States warship Morning Light and schooner Velocity, on January 21, 1863. Early in December, 1862, Captain Fowler was instructed by Gen. J. B. Magruder, commanding the military district of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, to proceed to the Sabine ri
Green Hall (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ycock's company, and others of Pyron's regiment of dismounted cavalry to the number of go or 100. A detachment of Spaight's battalion was likewise detailed for service as sharpshooters on board the boats. About the last of December, 1862, the Federal fleet abandoned their anchorage at Sabine pass and sailed out into the Gulf of Mexico, beyond the bar, no doubt having been notified of the preparations going forward for their attack. The Bell was commanded by Capt. Charles Fowler, with Green Hall as first officer. The Uncle Ben was under charge of Captain Johnson. The Davis Guards and Captain Aycock's company were assigned to duty on the Bell, the former as artillerymen, and the latter as sharpshooters, and the detachment of Spaight's battalion did similar service on board the Uncle Ben. There was a delay of several days on account of obstructions which had been placed in the channel between the mouth of the Sabine river and the lake for the purpose of preventing the passage of F
Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ation called forth all the dare-devil bravery of his followers, was obtained from the lips of men who were with him, who shared his danger, who admired his courage, and who were ready to risk their lives at his bidding. The engagement to which I refer was the capture of the United States warship Morning Light and schooner Velocity, on January 21, 1863. Early in December, 1862, Captain Fowler was instructed by Gen. J. B. Magruder, commanding the military district of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, to proceed to the Sabine river and there make selection of two or three steamboats and fit them up as gunboats, for the purpose of attacking the Federal gunboats which were in possession of Sabine pass. Having been vested with full power of impressment of such materials as might be necessary for carrying out the proposed plans in the shortest possible space of time, Captain Fowler selected the steamboats Josiah H. Bell and the Uncle Ben, the former about 180 feet long, and the latter pro
St. Joseph's Island (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
10: A famous naval Exploit capture of Federal vessels off Sabine Pass a lady's description engagement at Lighthouse, Sabine Pass defense of St. Joseph's island. The capture of the United States warship Morning Light and schooner Velocity, 30 miles off Sabine pass, January 21, 1863, by Confederates on the two steright, of Company D, Griffin's battalion, was killed, gallantly leading the men. No other casualties. On May 3d the enemy attempted to make a landing on St. Joseph's island, near Corpus Christi, but were brilliantly repelled by a small force under Capt. E. E. Hobby. Col. A. M. Hobby, Eighth Texas infantry, in command at Corpus distance of 2 miles, to Aransas bay. On the night of the 3d I removed ten bales of cotton, which had been captured by the enemy and placed on the shore of St. Joseph's island, and carefully concealed it, where it now awaits transportation. Privates Smith and Bell, of Captain Brackenridge's cavalry, accompanied me in the attack
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 11
h the other portions of the military department of Texas. The Sabine river below Orange and at a distance of about four miles from its mouth, widens into a large basin which is known as Sabine lake; the remainder of the river's course to the Gulf of Mexico is much narrower and also deeper, and is known as Sabine pass. Here the Federal blockading fleet lay at anchor when the fitting up of the river steamboats was begun by Captain Fowler, and it was intended to drive them from their position and of go or 100. A detachment of Spaight's battalion was likewise detailed for service as sharpshooters on board the boats. About the last of December, 1862, the Federal fleet abandoned their anchorage at Sabine pass and sailed out into the Gulf of Mexico, beyond the bar, no doubt having been notified of the preparations going forward for their attack. The Bell was commanded by Capt. Charles Fowler, with Green Hall as first officer. The Uncle Ben was under charge of Captain Johnson. The Dav
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e decks, fastening them to the floor timbers in the hold, and allowing them to extend up through the boiler deck, thus affording protection to the sharpshooters with which the boats were to be partly manned. Construction progressed slowly, as but few skilled mechanics could be had. The preparation and equipment of these boats were effected at Orange, which is situated on the Sabine river, and was at that time not reached by any railroad. The Texas & New Orleans railroad, extending from Houston to Beaumont, the nearest point to Orange, was in a very unsafe and at times impassable condition, but as Sabine pass at the mouth of Sabine river was blockaded, the railroad formed the only means of communication with the other portions of the military department of Texas. The Sabine river below Orange and at a distance of about four miles from its mouth, widens into a large basin which is known as Sabine lake; the remainder of the river's course to the Gulf of Mexico is much narrower and
Point Ybel (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 10: A famous naval Exploit capture of Federal vessels off Sabine Pass a lady's description engagement at Lighthouse, Sabine Pass defense of St. Joseph's island. The capture of the United States warship Morning Light and schooner Velocity, 30 miles off Sabine pass, January 21, 1863, by Confederates on the two steamboats, the Josiah H. Bell and the Uncle Ben, was one of the most extraordinary and hazardous naval exploits during the war, though of small proportions compared to many other battles. It was described as follows in the general orders, March 11th, of General Magruder: The commanding general having been prevented by various circumstances from acknowledging the services of the brave Major Watkins, and the gallant officers and men under his command in the recent victory at Sabine pass, takes this occasion to return them his public and official thanks for the accomplishment of a purpose of great importance to us, and their participation in an explo
Cowleech Fork Sabine River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
agruder, commanding the military district of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, to proceed to the Sabine river and there make selection of two or three steamboats and fit them up as gunboats, for the purphe preparation and equipment of these boats were effected at Orange, which is situated on the Sabine river, and was at that time not reached by any railroad. The Texas & New Orleans railroad, extendie, was in a very unsafe and at times impassable condition, but as Sabine pass at the mouth of Sabine river was blockaded, the railroad formed the only means of communication with the other portions of the military department of Texas. The Sabine river below Orange and at a distance of about four miles from its mouth, widens into a large basin which is known as Sabine lake; the remainder of the ridays on account of obstructions which had been placed in the channel between the mouth of the Sabine river and the lake for the purpose of preventing the passage of Federal vessels. The north wind
Sabine Lake (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ime not reached by any railroad. The Texas & New Orleans railroad, extending from Houston to Beaumont, the nearest point to Orange, was in a very unsafe and at times impassable condition, but as Sabine pass at the mouth of Sabine river was blockaded, the railroad formed the only means of communication with the other portions of the military department of Texas. The Sabine river below Orange and at a distance of about four miles from its mouth, widens into a large basin which is known as Sabine lake; the remainder of the river's course to the Gulf of Mexico is much narrower and also deeper, and is known as Sabine pass. Here the Federal blockading fleet lay at anchor when the fitting up of the river steamboats was begun by Captain Fowler, and it was intended to drive them from their position and capture them as soon as the equipment of the improvised Confederate gunboats was completed. An artillery company, composed entirely of Irishmen, and known as the Davis Guards, was detailed f
Aransas Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ng in the water. One of the launches reached the bark with only 2 men in it. The third launch being still further out in the gulf, pulled out of our range at the beginning of the fight. I do not think I am mistaken in estimating the loss of the enemy at 20 in killed, wounded and prisoners. I cannot too highly praise the conduct of the men on this occasion; they were regardless of danger. Their enthusiasm was only equaled by their bravery, and they promptly obeyed every command. The captured launch was carried by the men across the island, a distance of 2 miles, to Aransas bay. On the night of the 3d I removed ten bales of cotton, which had been captured by the enemy and placed on the shore of St. Joseph's island, and carefully concealed it, where it now awaits transportation. Privates Smith and Bell, of Captain Brackenridge's cavalry, accompanied me in the attack upon the launches, and also assisted in concealing the cotton. I am happy to say I have no casualties to report.
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