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Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
. The remarkable Confederate victory which followed is well told in the general orders of Major-General Magruder, and the report of Lieut. R. W. Dowling, which follow: General orders, no. 154. Headquarters, Dist. of Texas, N. M. and Arizona, Houston, September 9, 1863. 1. The major-general commanding has the satisfaction of announcing to the army a brilliant victory won by the little garrison of Sabine pass against the fleet of the enemy. Attacked by five gunboats, the fort, mochem opened on her with a 30-pounder Parrott gun. She fired three shots, but without effect, the shots all passing over the fort and missing the Ben. The whole fleet then drew off and remained out of range until 3:40 o'clock, when the Sachem and Arizona steamed into line up the Louisiana channel, the Clifton and one boat, name unknown, remaining at the junction of the two channels. I allowed the two former boats to approach within 1,200 yards, when I opened fire with the whole of my battery on
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith, who fixed his headquarters at Shreveport, on Red river, in Louisiana. After the fall of Vicksburg, on account of the difficulty of passing the mails across the Mississippi river, Dr. Jas. H. Starr, of Marshall, Tex., was placed in charge of the business of the postmaster-general on the west side of that river. His chief clerk was Washington D. Miller, who had been chief clerk of that department at Richmond. The Federals evidently desired after their defeat at Galveston to gain a position in Texas from which the interior of the State could be subjected to their control. They selected Sabine Pass as the place that would suit their purpose, the conquest of which was thought to be easy of accomplishment. In 1861 Major Likens' battalion had been stationed there, and had erected an earthwork at the pass below the town. The post was afterward under the command of Lieut.-Col. A. H. Spaight, who removed his command to Beaumont, September 23, 1862. The Federal
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
get men out of what was called Jernigan's thicket, which had been made a place of refuge by deserters and others that avoided conscription. It was reported that he had good success in doing it. After the posts on the Arkansas river had been taken by the Federals, the headquarters of the Trans-Mississippi department was moved to southern Arkansas. Shortly thereafter General Holmes was superseded in its command by Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith, who fixed his headquarters at Shreveport, on Red river, in Louisiana. After the fall of Vicksburg, on account of the difficulty of passing the mails across the Mississippi river, Dr. Jas. H. Starr, of Marshall, Tex., was placed in charge of the business of the postmaster-general on the west side of that river. His chief clerk was Washington D. Miller, who had been chief clerk of that department at Richmond. The Federals evidently desired after their defeat at Galveston to gain a position in Texas from which the interior of the State coul
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
and of Capt. Frank H. Odlum, of the First Texas heavy artillery, with Lieuts. Richard W. Dowling, Pat. H. Hennessy, and Wm. P. Cunningham, and about seventy men, most of whom were Irishmen. At New Orleans, in September, 1863, an expedition of large proportions was fitted up for its capture, the following account of which was published in the New York Herald by Lieut. Henry C. Dane, who was on that occasion attached to the Federal service as a member of the signal corps: The city of New Orleans was in a state of great excitement on the morning of September 4, 1863. A large expedition was leaving on some unrevealed, but avowedly very important mission. The levee was crowded with men, women and children, where troops were embarking and transports were moving away down the Mississippi, river, among grim and sullen-looking men-of-war. The object of the expedition was to capture a small fort at Sabine pass at the mouth of the Sabine river, and establish a base for larger operation
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
were two steamers evidently sounding for the channels on the bar, a large frigate outside. They remained all day at work, but during the evening were reinforced to the number of 22 vessels of different classes. On the morning of the 8th the United States gunboat Clifton anchored opposite the lighthouse and fired 26 shells at the fort, most of which passed a little over, or fell short, all, however, in excellent range, one shell being landed on the works and another striking the south angle offiring commenced at 6:30 o'clock and finished at 7:30 by the gunboat hauling off. During this time we had not replied by a single shot. All was then quiet until 11 o'clock, at which time the gunboat Uncle Ben steamed down near the fort. The United States gunboat Sachem opened on her with a 30-pounder Parrott gun. She fired three shots, but without effect, the shots all passing over the fort and missing the Ben. The whole fleet then drew off and remained out of range until 3:40 o'clock, when t
Cowleech Fork Sabine River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
member of the signal corps: The city of New Orleans was in a state of great excitement on the morning of September 4, 1863. A large expedition was leaving on some unrevealed, but avowedly very important mission. The levee was crowded with men, women and children, where troops were embarking and transports were moving away down the Mississippi, river, among grim and sullen-looking men-of-war. The object of the expedition was to capture a small fort at Sabine pass at the mouth of the Sabine river, and establish a base for larger operations. The Suffolk left New Orleans on the 5th and arrived off the pass, and stopped just out of sight of land on the 7th, where the entire fleet had been ordered to rendezvous to await the arrival of the general-in-chief. On the morning of the 8th a general council of war was held on the Suffolk, when it was decided to indulge in a little supreme strategy. Two gunboats, the Clifton, a New York ferryboat transformed into a warship, and the Sachem,
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 11: Movement of troops from Arkansas to Northern Louisiana the engagements there Gen. E. Kirby Smith assumes command of the Trans-Mississippi department headquarters moved to Shreveport mails superintended by Dr. J. H. Starr Sabine Pass Federal preparations to capture it splendid naval battle in its defense. In April, 1862, Walker's division of infantry left Arkansas and moved down to the northern part of Louisiana, where portions of the command, with Colonel Parsons' cavalry brigade and some artillery companies, had engagements on and near the Mississippi river, at Milliken's bend and at the Great mound, as it was reported, tccess in doing it. After the posts on the Arkansas river had been taken by the Federals, the headquarters of the Trans-Mississippi department was moved to southern Arkansas. Shortly thereafter General Holmes was superseded in its command by Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith, who fixed his headquarters at Shreveport, on Red river, in L
Sabine Pass (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
m and sullen-looking men-of-war. The object of the expedition was to capture a small fort at Sabine pass at the mouth of the Sabine river, and establish a base for larger operations. The Suffolk le the satisfaction of announcing to the army a brilliant victory won by the little garrison of Sabine pass against the fleet of the enemy. Attacked by five gunboats, the fort, mounting but three gunsintending a landing at the first favorable moment. He may endeavor to retrieve his losses at Sabine pass by an attack upon the works at other points on the coast. Should this be the case the major-consisted of 20 vessels, and that they had about 1,500 men on board. The 200 Confederates at Sabine pass were composed of detachments from Griffin's and Spaight's battalions. In his report to Genbar, to enable them to get outside again. General Magruder ordered the following troops to Sabine pass and vicinity immediately: Third regiment infantry, Gould's regiment, four companies Griffi
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
the command moved to the vicinity of Alexandria, La. On August 26th, Brig.-Gen. Henry E. McCulloch was ordered to take command in the Northern sub-district of Texas, with headquarters at Bonham. The object of his going there was by either forcible or pacific efforts to get men out of what was called Jernigan's thicket, which had been made a place of refuge by deserters and others that avoided conscription. It was reported that he had good success in doing it. After the posts on the Arkansas river had been taken by the Federals, the headquarters of the Trans-Mississippi department was moved to southern Arkansas. Shortly thereafter General Holmes was superseded in its command by Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith, who fixed his headquarters at Shreveport, on Red river, in Louisiana. After the fall of Vicksburg, on account of the difficulty of passing the mails across the Mississippi river, Dr. Jas. H. Starr, of Marshall, Tex., was placed in charge of the business of the postmaster-gener
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
is men mustered on the banks and moved into position ready for sudden action. The scene now was quite imposing. The large fleet of transports, attended by six gunboats, including the blockader, were now ready to assault, capture and possess the southern half of the great State of Texas. The remarkable Confederate victory which followed is well told in the general orders of Major-General Magruder, and the report of Lieut. R. W. Dowling, which follow: General orders, no. 154. Headquarters, Dist. of Texas, N. M. and Arizona, Houston, September 9, 1863. 1. The major-general commanding has the satisfaction of announcing to the army a brilliant victory won by the little garrison of Sabine pass against the fleet of the enemy. Attacked by five gunboats, the fort, mounting but three guns of small caliber and manned by the Davis Guards, Lieut. R. W. Dowling, assisted by Lieut. N. H. Smith, of the engineers, supported by about 200 men, the whole under the command of Capt. F. H.
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