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Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
d assigned to the Second brigade, General Waul having resigned on account of wounds. Maj. R. P. McCay was promoted to brigadier general commanding the First brigade, and Col. Richard Waterhouse was promoted and put in command of the Third brigade, Walker's division. About the middle of June, 1864, Maj.-Gen. John G. Walker was relieved from his division and assigned to the command of the district of Southwest Louisiana in place of Gen. Richard Taylor, who was transferred east of the Mississippi river. Brigadier-General King for a time was in command of Walker's division, until Maj.-Gen. John H, Forney arrived and took charge. General King was then assigned to the brigade of General Polignac, who left the country and returned to France. In the meantime General Magruder had been assigned to duty in southern Arkansas, with the view of keeping the Federals pressed back to the Arkansas river, which was held by General Steele. About the 18th of January, 1865, Lieutenant-General Buckne
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
trict of Southwest Louisiana in place of Gen. Richard Taylor, who was transferred east of the Mississippi river. Brigadier-General King for a time was in command of Walker's division, until Maj.-Gen. John H, Forney arrived and took charge. General King was then assigned to the brigade of General Polignac, who left the country and returned to France. In the meantime General Magruder had been assigned to duty in southern Arkansas, with the view of keeping the Federals pressed back to the Arkansas river, which was held by General Steele. About the 18th of January, 1865, Lieutenant-General Buckner arrived to take command of the district of Louisiana, and issued an encouraging address to the troops. The Texas troops generally in Louisiana commenced a movement to Texas, and by March 15th a large number of them had reached Camp Grice, 2 1/2 miles east of Hempstead. Not long afterward a rumor reached them of the surrender of Generals Lee, Johnston and Taylor. Some doubted, but soon t
France (France) (search for this): chapter 16
de, Walker's division. About the middle of June, 1864, Maj.-Gen. John G. Walker was relieved from his division and assigned to the command of the district of Southwest Louisiana in place of Gen. Richard Taylor, who was transferred east of the Mississippi river. Brigadier-General King for a time was in command of Walker's division, until Maj.-Gen. John H, Forney arrived and took charge. General King was then assigned to the brigade of General Polignac, who left the country and returned to France. In the meantime General Magruder had been assigned to duty in southern Arkansas, with the view of keeping the Federals pressed back to the Arkansas river, which was held by General Steele. About the 18th of January, 1865, Lieutenant-General Buckner arrived to take command of the district of Louisiana, and issued an encouraging address to the troops. The Texas troops generally in Louisiana commenced a movement to Texas, and by March 15th a large number of them had reached Camp Grice, 2
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
conduct which caused his promotion, if such a thing were practicable, which it is not now. It may not be improper to speak of five of them who were educated at West Point, as follows: Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston was a native of Kentucky, and after graduating at West Point in 1826 entered the army. He resigned his position andWest Point in 1826 entered the army. He resigned his position and came to Texas in 1836, and in 1837 was placed at the head of the Texas army, and afterward was adjutant-general under President Lamar. His headright of land, located in eastern Texas, is evidence of his permanent citizenship in Texas. In 1846 he became a colonel in the Mexican war, and afterward commanded a Federal regiment in aving served on our frontier as an officer. Gen. Horace Randal was born in Texas, and so was Colonel McNeill, both of whom, and General Maxey, were educated at West Point. A peculiar case was that of Adam R. Johnson. He was a citizen of Texas and a surveyor. He went back to his native State, Kentucky, became a scout for Genera
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
hich caused his promotion, if such a thing were practicable, which it is not now. It may not be improper to speak of five of them who were educated at West Point, as follows: Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston was a native of Kentucky, and after graduating at West Point in 1826 entered the army. He resigned his position and came to Texas in 1836, and in 1837 was placed at the head of the Texas army, and afterward was adjutant-general under President Lamar. His headright of land, located in eastern Texas, is evidence of his permanent citizenship in Texas. In 1846 he became a colonel in the Mexican war, and afterward commanded a Federal regiment in service in California, from which he resigned, went overland through Texas to Richmond, and was appointed general and assigned to command in Kentucky. He was wounded, and died in April, 1862. This meager statement of the splendid career of this great general is sufficient to bring to view the question why it is claimed that he was a Texas of
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
in the daytime. It was not with a disaffected spirit in mutiny against their superior officers; but it was as in the case of the wrecked vessel slowly sinking; when the captain's power of control had ceased by common consent, the manning of the boat any longer was seen to be hopeless, and the personal safety of each one on board was the common concern, to be secured if practicable each in his own way. In the meantime, on May 1st, General Sprague, a Federal officer, arrived at the mouth of Red river with dispatches from General Canby, demanding the surrender of the Trans-Mississippi department by Gen. Kirby Smith. Thereupon steps were taken for negotiations looking to that result. The Confederate troops continued to leave their camps, so that by the 19th of May a majority of them had gone or were preparing to leave, when the balance of them being discharged started for their homes, taking with them one wagon and team to the company, with their baggage, provisions, and arms. The s
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: Texas troops in Arkansas and Louisiana move southward changes and promotions no more battles Camp Grice-news of the surrender of Gen. R. Eelieved from his division and assigned to the command of the district of Southwest Louisiana in place of Gen. Richard Taylor, who was transferred east of the Missississued an encouraging address to the troops. The Texas troops generally in Louisiana commenced a movement to Texas, and by March 15th a large number of them had rotected Texas from the invasion of the enemy, and when they went to Arkansas, Louisiana and other States in the Confederate service, they were still protecting Texasof houses burned in the vandal-like marches of the enemy, as they had seen in Louisiana There were no farms, homes and towns made desolate by the ravages of a cruel the Texas troops in the numerous battles in which they were engaged in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, the large
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ows: Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston was a native of Kentucky, and after graduating at West Point in 1826 entered the army. He resigned his position and came to Texas in 1836, and in 1837 was placed at the head of the Texas army, and afterward was adjutant-general under President Lamar. His headright of land, located in eastern Texas, is evidence of his permanent citizenship in Texas. In 1846 he became a colonel in the Mexican war, and afterward commanded a Federal regiment in service in California, from which he resigned, went overland through Texas to Richmond, and was appointed general and assigned to command in Kentucky. He was wounded, and died in April, 1862. This meager statement of the splendid career of this great general is sufficient to bring to view the question why it is claimed that he was a Texas officer in the Confederate army. While in command of his regiment in different States, he was in them as a mere sojourner, liable to be assigned any day to any other State
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: Texas troops in Arkansas and Louisiana move southward changes and promotions no more battles Camp Grice-news of the surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee Generals Kirby Smith, Magrudtry and returned to France. In the meantime General Magruder had been assigned to duty in southern Arkansas, with the view of keeping the Federals pressed back to the Arkansas river, which was held oming soldiers. They had protected Texas from the invasion of the enemy, and when they went to Arkansas, Louisiana and other States in the Confederate service, they were still protecting Texas. Therrom discharges on account of sickness. Those who were in service in the far moister climate of Arkansas, east and northeast of Little Rock, in less than a year lost by death and by discharges from sixas troops in the numerous battles in which they were engaged in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, the large number of promotions for meritorious con
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
in all of the many commands that went there from Texas. Other instances might be referred to, but this will suffice to illustrate the importance of every particular section in an extensive country, with conditions of climate varying from each other, furnishing if practicable a force sufficient for its own protection. In taking a survey of the operations of the Texas troops in the numerous battles in which they were engaged in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, the large number of promotions for meritorious conduct in them will attract attention as a remarkable result. Maj. John Henry Brown, who was an officer in the army from nearly the first to the last, in his valuable history of Texas reported that of Texans in the army, one became a general, Albert Sidney Johnston, the highest rank; one lieutenant-general, John B. Hood; three major-generals, Samuel B. Maxey, John A. Wharton and Thomas Green; 32 brigadier-generals, 97 colonels,
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