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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 8
command of Colonel Ford on the lower Rio Grande, other troops were sent there that were in the Confederate service, who occupied different posts in 1862 and 1863, and subsequently in what was called the Western subdis-trict, which extended from a line due south from San Antonio to the Rio Grande, and from its mouth up to Laredo. It was important to have the posts on the Gulf protected, as well as to have the posts on the Rio Grande garrisoned, to facilitate the trade across that river into Mexico, for the export of cotton, and the purchase of arms and munitions of war and commodities for the use of families in Texas. The forces in the Western sub-district were distributed as follows in 1862: Capt. L. C. Pyron, two cavalry companies at Columbus. Col. P. C. Wood's cavalry regiment, and Maj. D. D. Shea's artillery, at Lavaca. Maj. A. M. Hobby, infantry battalion, four companies, and Captain Wilke's battery, at Corpus Christi. Maj. Joseph Taylor, cavalry battalion, and Capt. Ja
Huntsville, Tex. (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
h cavalry, James Deshler, colonel; Nicholas H. Darnell, lieutenant-colonel; J. T. Coit, major. Tenth infantry, R. Q. Mills, colonel; Robert Young, major. Fifteenth cavalry, Geo. H. Sweet, colonel; W. K. Masters, lieutenant-colonel; G. B. Pickett, major. Twenty-fifth cavalry, Clayton C. Gillespie, colonel; Wm. N. Neyland, lieutenant-colonel; J. A. Dark, major. Most of these regiments were furnished with cloth for tents, knapsacks, and for some clothing, by the State penitentiary at Huntsville, Tex. Many of them were supplied with wagons and teams at or near Tyler, by order of Brig.-Gen. Henry E. McCulloch, some of them also by Maj. J. E. Kirby, who was stationed at that place by General Hebert for the purpose, and to establish a factory for making harness leather and saddles for the army. Those regiments that got to Arkansas first were stationed at what was later called Camp Nelson, commanded by Colonel Nelson, who was shortly afterward appointed brigadier-general, but died a sh
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
which, unfortunately, was not done; to authorize the governor to have the salt lake in Hidalgo county, known as Sal del Rey, taken possession of by an agent, who was empowered to sell the salt at the usual price, etc., and act under the direction of the governor. Thus the executive officers were furnished by the legislature with ample means and authority to accomplish most important objects, military and otherwise, to promote the interest of the State and its people, as a part of the Confederate States. During the session of the legislature, in the fall and winter of 1861, there was a concerted effort by the members from east and north of Trinity river to have a separate military district organized there, with its headquarters at some central point for the purpose of organizing, training and fitting out troops for the war, to be sent where needed in an efficient body, and not to be sent in small bodies to different parts of the country out of the State, as seemed then to be the t
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ew localities; for the war spirit at that time was at fever heat, and controlled the action of the mass of the people in Texas. Col. John S. Ford discharged the State troops that had gone in the expedition on the lower Rio Grande in 1861, when their term of service expired, and was relieved by Colonel Luckett and his command, who remained for some time at Fort Brown. Colonel Ford was ordered to San Antonio by General Bee in May, 1862, and by his suggestion was placed on conscript duty at Austin, and there organized his command for the discharge of that duty, with Capt. Wm. E. Walsh, Henry Trask, lieutenant and adjutant; Wm. Stowe, quartermaster and commissary; and Dr. Rogers, surgeon. A camp of conscription was located near Tyler with Lieut. Willie Thomas in command, aided by Lieutenant Broker. Similar camps were established in different parts of the State from time to time. Their purpose was to hunt out persons liable to military duty that did not volunteer, and send them into
Camp Nelson, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
furnished with cloth for tents, knapsacks, and for some clothing, by the State penitentiary at Huntsville, Tex. Many of them were supplied with wagons and teams at or near Tyler, by order of Brig.-Gen. Henry E. McCulloch, some of them also by Maj. J. E. Kirby, who was stationed at that place by General Hebert for the purpose, and to establish a factory for making harness leather and saddles for the army. Those regiments that got to Arkansas first were stationed at what was later called Camp Nelson, commanded by Colonel Nelson, who was shortly afterward appointed brigadier-general, but died a short time after he was appointed. He was succeeded in the command by Gen. Henry E. McCulloch, who had gone there with a number of the regiments that he had fitted out with teams and wagons. The Fourth brigade, under Colonel Deshler, was ordered to Arkansas Post at the mouth of the Arkansas river, and with Colonel Garland's brigade, composed of his regiment (Sixth infantry) and those of Col
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ich he did, prescribing for himself a district in Texas, east of the Trinity river, and north of what was known as the old San Antonio road, and requiring all commands, either raised or passing through the district, to report to him. A great deal of work was done there in advancing the service during the first half of 1862, as will appear further on. Before the end of the year 1861 the people of Texas had heard of the two splendid victories of the Confederate forces, that of Oak Hills in Missouri and that of Bull Run in Virginia; and while the information inspired a joyful pride, it discouraged the necessity for continued effort to follow the success attained. Volunteering in the service was very slow, especially in forming infantry battalions and regiments. The Confederate officers that were sent to organize troops in Texas were personally unknown, and consequently could exercise but little influence. General Hebert having his headquarters first at Galveston, and then about the
Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
in Texas. Col. John S. Ford discharged the State troops that had gone in the expedition on the lower Rio Grande in 1861, when their term of service expired, and was relieved by Colonel Luckett and his command, who remained for some time at Fort Brown. Colonel Ford was ordered to San Antonio by General Bee in May, 1862, and by his suggestion was placed on conscript duty at Austin, and there organized his command for the discharge of that duty, with Capt. Wm. E. Walsh, Henry Trask, lieutenantckett's infantry regiment, ten companies; Capt. R. Benevides, one cavalry company; Maj. Wm. O. Yager, four cavalry companies; Capt. E. Cruegbaur's heavy artillery; Capt. R. B. Maclin's light artillery, and Capt. S. Benavides, one cavalry company, on the Rio Grande from Fort Brown to Laredo. Although these particular commands did not continue in that sub-district, there was generally an effort to keep a force there sufficient to protect the ports and keep the way open for the Mexican trade.
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
y of Texas troops that retained their organization to the end of the war. It was in service in Louisiana in 1863 and 1864, and at the battles of Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, and Jenkins' Ferry, Ark. It nt with headquarters at Houston. When the action of the division in various battles fought in Louisiana and Arkansas shall have been fully described, it will redound to the well-earned fame of the Tant-colonel; L. J. Farrar, major. These constituted Parsons' cavalry brigade, which served in Louisiana. A brigade was formed near Fort Smith, of Texas troops, and the command of it assigned to Cnson, lieutenant-colonel; John A. Buck, major. Part of this brigade was in the battles of southern Louisiana, and was afterward under command of General Polignac in Mouton's division. Other commanrved in Texas for a time, and finally belonged to the division commanded by Gen. Tom Green, in Louisiana: Cavalry battalion, B. E. Waller, lieutenant-colonel; H. H. Boone, major. Partisan Rangers
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t difficulty of raising infantry-cavalry Easily raised a number of infantry regiments sent to Arkansas and form a division capture of Arkansas post regiment sent to Indian Territory battle at Poison Spring troops sent to Mississippi and Tennessee regiments and battalions retained in Tex as State troops martial law conscription troops for Rio Grande. At the regular State election in August, 1861, Francis R. Lubbock was elected governor of Texas, and John W. Crockett lieutenantoning these regiments, the lieutenant-colonels and majors have been given when practicable, because the first colonels were often taken from their regiments by promotion, death or sickness, leaving others in command. Ector's regiment went to Tennessee, where he afterward commanded a brigade. There also went the regiment of cavalry of M. F. Locke, colonel; J. M. Barton, lieutenant-colonel; W. Q. Craig, major. Camp's regiment, M. L. Camp, colonel; T. Camp, lieutenantcol-onel. Wilkes' regime
Hidalgo (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ses; to create a hospital fund of $50,000, to be used by the governor through bonded agents appointed by him. Also joint resolutions: To authorize the governor to appoint persons to carry to soldiers clothes that may be contributed by citizens or otherwise; to require the adjutant-general of the State to collect such information as was necessary to make a register of Texas State and Confederate troops, which, unfortunately, was not done; to authorize the governor to have the salt lake in Hidalgo county, known as Sal del Rey, taken possession of by an agent, who was empowered to sell the salt at the usual price, etc., and act under the direction of the governor. Thus the executive officers were furnished by the legislature with ample means and authority to accomplish most important objects, military and otherwise, to promote the interest of the State and its people, as a part of the Confederate States. During the session of the legislature, in the fall and winter of 1861, there was
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