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heir range. Upon the fleet turning up the channel toward the city, the two 24-pounders in battery on the bay side, near the east end of the city, opened fire on them, but our shot fell short, and the vessels having now come up to our flag of truce boat, ceased firing and took our messenger on board their flagship, and the fleet came to anchor. The assemblage of vessels off the bar on the day previous had given us every reason to expect an attack, and during that day and the morning of the 4th, I had made arrangements with the railroad company to be ready with transportation to meet any emergency that might occur. Having some time previous to this been ordered by the general commanding the department to withdraw our troops from the city in case the enemy should bring to bear against our position such a force as to overcome our defenses at Fort Point and enable them to command the harbor, and after the gun at Fort Point was silenced, having no further effective means of defending t
e two guns at South battery were unspiked and removed and all of them have been safely landed at Virginia point. I caused the people of the city to be fully notified in relation to matters which you directed they should be advised of. All machinery of any value was removed. The civil authorities removed all county records of every kind and all the records of the city corporation and of the district court. The railroad company removed all their material of every kind, and by 11 a. m. of the 8th we had removed all the government property of any value, except the 10-inch gun at Fort Point, and a large majority of the population of the city left their houses and the island. The troops having all been removed in accordance with your orders, I left with my staff for Virginia point, leaving a sufficient force to hold the battery at the south end of the railroad bridge, and that evening I reported at this place to Col. X. B. Debray, commanding sub-military district of Houston. It affor
ederates and the vessel saved. There was no attempt to enter the port of Galveston with a view of capturing the city until the fall of 1862. On September 23, 1862, the Federal vessels entered the port of Sabine Pass, and Lieut.-Col. A. W. Spaight, in command there, retired with his forces to Beaumont, not having a sufficient force to resist the Federals. Lieutenant-Colonel Spaight made the following report of that engagement: Beaumont, Tex., September 26, 1862. Sir: On the 23d inst. (Maj. J. S. Irvine commanding at Sabine Pass during my absence under orders at Houston) two armed sail vessels and one steam propeller came to anchor just outside the bar. Early the next morning, the two sail vessels, having crossed the bar, took position and opened fire on our works, to which we promptly replied; but the shots from both sides fell far short. They then approached nearer, when a brisk fire from both sides was resumed and continued until dark. To the chagrin of officers an
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 9
-Military District of Houston. A successful defense was made of Port Lavaca by Maj. D. D. Shea, in command there, on October 31st, and reported as follows: Headquarters, Lavaca, Tex., November 1, 1862. Sir: By order of Maj. Daniel D. Shea, commanding this post, I have the honor to make, for the information of the general commanding this district, the following report of an engagement between the Federal steamers and the batteries at this point: On the morning of October 31st two Federal steamers appeared in sight, evidently steering for this place. About 11 a. m. they arrived within a short distance, when they cast anchor. At 1 p. m. they sent a flag of truce on shore, which was met by Major Shea, accompanied by four of the citizens of the town. A short interview succeeded,, during which a demand was made for the surrender of the town. They were answered by the commanding officer that he was there to defend it, and should do so to the best of his ability with all
October 31st (search for this): chapter 9
ully submitted. Yours respectfully, Jos. J. Cook, Colonel Commanding. Lieut. R. M. Franklin, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. Sub-Military District of Houston. A successful defense was made of Port Lavaca by Maj. D. D. Shea, in command there, on October 31st, and reported as follows: Headquarters, Lavaca, Tex., November 1, 1862. Sir: By order of Maj. Daniel D. Shea, commanding this post, I have the honor to make, for the information of the general commanding this district, the following report of an engagement between the Federal steamers and the batteries at this point: On the morning of October 31st two Federal steamers appeared in sight, evidently steering for this place. About 11 a. m. they arrived within a short distance, when they cast anchor. At 1 p. m. they sent a flag of truce on shore, which was met by Major Shea, accompanied by four of the citizens of the town. A short interview succeeded,, during which a demand was made for the surrender of the town. They we
November 1st (search for this): chapter 9
of shot and shell rained around them; and this, although yellow fever had decimated their ranks, and that many of the men who manned the batteries had but partially recovered from the fever, entitles them to the highest praise. The steamers were struck several times, and one of them partially disabled as they immediately steamed off out of range of our batteries, where they again cast anchor and kept up a steady fire upon the town and batteries, until night shut in. On the next morning, November 1st, they again opened fire upon the town and batteries, but owing to their being entirely out of range of our guns, we did not reply to them. At about 11 a. m. they ceased their fire, and steamed down the bay in the direction of Indianola, having in tow the schooner Lecompt, which they had captured in the bay a few days before. One of the steamers went outside the bar and steered in the direction of Galveston, probably for a mortar-boat or some additional force to assist them. I am glad
November 8th (search for this): chapter 9
Indians. That enabled them to combine their forces when necessary to repel any invasion. The frontier on the lower Rio Grande and for some distance up that river, in the Western sub-district, was protected by Confederate troops stationed there in 1862 and 1863, under the command of General Bee. There were no fights of much importance on the frontier during those two years. On August 3 and 5, 1861, the Federal ships South Carolina and Dart shelled Galveston, with no great damage. On November 8th the Royal Yacht was captured in Galveston harbor, in the night, by launches from the blockader, Santee. The Yacht was fired and abandoned after the crew were taken off, but the fire was afterward extinguished by the Confederates and the vessel saved. There was no attempt to enter the port of Galveston with a view of capturing the city until the fall of 1862. On September 23, 1862, the Federal vessels entered the port of Sabine Pass, and Lieut.-Col. A. W. Spaight, in command there, r
August 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 9
oldiers could ride every day from one to the other and thereby get notice of any raid attempted or made by the Indians. That enabled them to combine their forces when necessary to repel any invasion. The frontier on the lower Rio Grande and for some distance up that river, in the Western sub-district, was protected by Confederate troops stationed there in 1862 and 1863, under the command of General Bee. There were no fights of much importance on the frontier during those two years. On August 3 and 5, 1861, the Federal ships South Carolina and Dart shelled Galveston, with no great damage. On November 8th the Royal Yacht was captured in Galveston harbor, in the night, by launches from the blockader, Santee. The Yacht was fired and abandoned after the crew were taken off, but the fire was afterward extinguished by the Confederates and the vessel saved. There was no attempt to enter the port of Galveston with a view of capturing the city until the fall of 1862. On September 23
August 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 9
ride every day from one to the other and thereby get notice of any raid attempted or made by the Indians. That enabled them to combine their forces when necessary to repel any invasion. The frontier on the lower Rio Grande and for some distance up that river, in the Western sub-district, was protected by Confederate troops stationed there in 1862 and 1863, under the command of General Bee. There were no fights of much importance on the frontier during those two years. On August 3 and 5, 1861, the Federal ships South Carolina and Dart shelled Galveston, with no great damage. On November 8th the Royal Yacht was captured in Galveston harbor, in the night, by launches from the blockader, Santee. The Yacht was fired and abandoned after the crew were taken off, but the fire was afterward extinguished by the Confederates and the vessel saved. There was no attempt to enter the port of Galveston with a view of capturing the city until the fall of 1862. On September 23, 1862, the
r protection Galveston shelled conscription evacuation of Sabine Pass Yellow fever evacuation of Galveston, October, 1862 defense of Port Lavaca. Early in 1862 a frontier cavalry regiment was raised for twelve months service, first commanded by J. M. Norris, colonel; A. T. Obenchain, lieutenant-colonel; Jas. E. McCord, maion. The frontier on the lower Rio Grande and for some distance up that river, in the Western sub-district, was protected by Confederate troops stationed there in 1862 and 1863, under the command of General Bee. There were no fights of much importance on the frontier during those two years. On August 3 and 5, 1861, the Federaard extinguished by the Confederates and the vessel saved. There was no attempt to enter the port of Galveston with a view of capturing the city until the fall of 1862. On September 23, 1862, the Federal vessels entered the port of Sabine Pass, and Lieut.-Col. A. W. Spaight, in command there, retired with his forces to Beaumo
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