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New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
the aristocracy never live in any city except London. If a person resides in a city in England, you may almost know that he is not an aristocrat. But it was not only the leaders of the middle class, the wealthy merchants and great manufacturers, the liberal writers and thinkers, who delighted to do General Grant honor, it was those who, in that country, are lower still in the social scale,—the working class. At places like Sheffield, and Sunderland, and Birmingham, and Manchester, and Newcastle, the popular demonstration equaled any in America immediately after the war. Towns were illuminated because of his presence, triumphal arches were erected in his honor, holidays were proclaimed when he arrived, hundreds of thousands turned out to meet him, the banks of the Tyne were covered with working people for twenty miles. The horses were taken from his carriage more than once, and the crowds gathered around to shake his hand, just as if he had led their armies or fought for their ca
Cambria (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 30
so much as this, but insisted that their presence should be considered a visit, which was to be punctiliously returned, and I went about with the poor General half the next day leaving cards. When Mr. Pierrepont gave a dinner to the Prince of Wales for General Grant, the same question came up again; for as Pierrepont was a Minister he could not invite the Prince of Wales without asking the Ambassadors, while they, if they wanted to, could not stay away. The matter was duly considered by thWales without asking the Ambassadors, while they, if they wanted to, could not stay away. The matter was duly considered by the Lord Chamberlain and the envoy and the Ambassadors, and I am not sure that the Prince himself was not consulted, for he is a great authority on etiquette. Finally it was agreed that for this occasion General Grant might precede the Ambassadors; and as there were only two ladies present the Prince took in Mrs. Pierrepont and Mr. Pierrepont took Mrs. Grant. The Ambassadors followed, and there was no war. Mr. Pierrepont constantly gave up his place to General Grant, for this was necessary a
Birmingham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 30
r manufacturing population, and the aristocracy never live in any city except London. If a person resides in a city in England, you may almost know that he is not an aristocrat. But it was not only the leaders of the middle class, the wealthy merchants and great manufacturers, the liberal writers and thinkers, who delighted to do General Grant honor, it was those who, in that country, are lower still in the social scale,—the working class. At places like Sheffield, and Sunderland, and Birmingham, and Manchester, and Newcastle, the popular demonstration equaled any in America immediately after the war. Towns were illuminated because of his presence, triumphal arches were erected in his honor, holidays were proclaimed when he arrived, hundreds of thousands turned out to meet him, the banks of the Tyne were covered with working people for twenty miles. The horses were taken from his carriage more than once, and the crowds gathered around to shake his hand, just as if he had led thei
Queenstown (Irish Republic) (search for this): chapter 30
e expense. He said we had messed together in the field, and there was no reason why we should not do it again. I was only too glad to have him with me on any terms, and told him he should decide. Circumstances afterward changed this arrangement. He passed only three weeks under my roof, and for this period he consented to become my guest, for he knew the great pleasure it would give me; but he left America intending to go direct to my house, and to mess with me. Before he arrived at Queenstown, Mr. Pierrepont, the American Minister, who had also been Grant's Attorney-General, determined to ask the ex-President to stay with him. This would be so advantageous from a public point of view that I could offer no opposition. I met General Grant at Liverpool, and he agreed with me that it was more appropriate for him first to visit the Minister. Accordingly, he divided his time between us. Mr. Pierrepont had taken every step in advance to secure for his former chief a fitting recep
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
correct to say that no provision is made in America for honoring ex-Presidents. The regulations of the Navy prescribe that the same salute shall be given to an ex-President as to a President, and although no rules for precedence exist in the United States, except at Washington, there could be no occasion, public or private, when General Grant would not receive the first place, after the actual President. Mr. Pierrepont discussed these points with Lord Derby, the Minister for Foreign Affairsght there was too much consequence given to etiquette at the time, but the incidents that happened to Fillmore and Van Buren show what might have occurred to Grant; and some of the good feeling which at present exists between England and the United States might not have been aroused, had the representative American been slighted or officially ignored. The difficulty Mr. Pierrepont had in arranging the matter shows that such an event was not impossible. But the English Government was as goo
Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 30
uren, and nothing more. Mr. Pierrepont said, that in a country where such matters are regarded as important, he was not willing that General Grant should suffer what might seem like an indignity. But at first the English were not inclined to make any distinction in favor of General Grant. They said: Americans give their ex-Presidents no rank, why should we? When Pierrepont pointed out that ex-Kings received peculiar honors, he was told that they were born in the purple; the ex-King of Hanover was the Queen's own cousin. They forgot that the ex-Emperor of the French, the veriest of pretenders and interlopers, was treated as an equal by Queen Victoria after his downfall; yet he had not even served out his term, but was deposed by the people who, he claimed, had elected him. It was besides incorrect to say that no provision is made in America for honoring ex-Presidents. The regulations of the Navy prescribe that the same salute shall be given to an ex-President as to a President,
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 30
y was prodigious. He was taken to the Custom House, and ten thousand respectable citizens crowded into the hall to give him the first promise of what was to follow all over the land. The next day the scene was repeated; and so it went on. At Manchester he was the guest of the city and lodged in the Town Hall, which had never been occupied by State guests before. Banquets and processions were made for him, orations delivered; he was taken to the places of public interest—always by people of t manufacturers, the liberal writers and thinkers, who delighted to do General Grant honor, it was those who, in that country, are lower still in the social scale,—the working class. At places like Sheffield, and Sunderland, and Birmingham, and Manchester, and Newcastle, the popular demonstration equaled any in America immediately after the war. Towns were illuminated because of his presence, triumphal arches were erected in his honor, holidays were proclaimed when he arrived, hundreds of thousa
Edwards Pierrepont (search for this): chapter 30
dingly, he divided his time between us. Mr. Pierrepont had taken every step in advance to secure more and Mr. Van Buren, and nothing more. Mr. Pierrepont said, that in a country where such mattersirst place, after the actual President. Mr. Pierrepont discussed these points with Lord Derby, thrward and then leave out the Ambassadors. Mr. Pierrepont was obliged to go to the dinner, for he wa as ex-President was due to the efforts of Mr. Pierrepont. Without those efforts General Grant woulted or officially ignored. The difficulty Mr. Pierrepont had in arranging the matter shows that sucl half the next day leaving cards. When Mr. Pierrepont gave a dinner to the Prince of Wales for Gnly two ladies present the Prince took in Mrs. Pierrepont and Mr. Pierrepont took Mrs. Grant. The ssadors followed, and there was no war. Mr. Pierrepont constantly gave up his place to General Gr and others whenever the occasion arose; for Pierrepont's difficulties were presented to other Minis[4 more...]
Wellington (search for this): chapter 30
ed not to invite General Grant on this occasion, but to ask him afterward and then leave out the Ambassadors. Mr. Pierrepont was obliged to go to the dinner, for he was an envoy, and to stay away would be a slight to the Queen; but the Duke of Wellington asked General Grant for the same night, and had no Ambassadors. All this was arranged before General Grant arrived in London, and without his knowledge. Had he been consulted he would probably have said that he wished no question raised, bun Spain, and General Read in Greece, and others whenever the occasion arose; for Pierrepont's difficulties were presented to other Ministers. The first dinner General Grant attended in London was at Apsley House, the residence of the Duke of Wellington. The son of the great English soldier said that it was proper for him to welcome the first of American soldiers. He descended to the door to receive General Grant, according to the etiquette maintained with royal personages, and escorted him
s agreed that for this occasion General Grant might precede the Ambassadors; and as there were only two ladies present the Prince took in Mrs. Pierrepont and Mr. Pierrepont took Mrs. Grant. The Ambassadors followed, and there was no war. Mr. Pierrepont constantly gave up his place to General Grant, for this was necessary according to court rules. No American can properly precede the American Minister at the court to which he is accredited. Mr. Lowell did the same thing in Spain, and General Read in Greece, and others whenever the occasion arose; for Pierrepont's difficulties were presented to other Ministers. The first dinner General Grant attended in London was at Apsley House, the residence of the Duke of Wellington. The son of the great English soldier said that it was proper for him to welcome the first of American soldiers. He descended to the door to receive General Grant, according to the etiquette maintained with royal personages, and escorted him in the same way on
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