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Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
so represented a nation before? not only the Government, but the plainest people in it from whom he sprang, whom he claimed as his fellows, whom he believed in as his political peers. The multitudes that thronged around him in Birmingham and Frankfort and Jeddo all knew this, and perceived, though dimly, that they were honoring the democratic principle in honoring him; while the sovereigns thought they were acting as became their own dignity in placing him by their side. It was my fortuneto a fair and saw all the village shows; he liked them quite as well as any palace with a history. He questioned the people through me and was curious about their ways, but he had never heard of Mrs. Norton's poem of Bingen on the Rhine. At Frankfort he fell in with some of his Jewish friends, and was quite as much at home with the Seligmans as if they had been princes, though his last host had been the King of the Belgians. Here he was taken to two famous wine-cellars, and tasted in each
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 34
real and Quebec, and then came the first premonitions of the honors destined to be heaped upon him abroad twelve and fourteen years afterward. The Governor-General of Canada offered him a dinner, and put him in the royal pew; the Canadian towns welcomed him almost as if he had saved their country or led their armies. I met him when he landed in England in 1877, and accompanied him, by permission of the Government, wherever he went in Great Britain. I was with him in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France. Always he was the same simple, impassive man, the genuine democrat. The compliments of Kings did not disturb him; the adulation offered by whole populations did not elate him unduly that I could ever discern. After his departure from England and his short visit to Belgium he proceeded up the Rhine. At Cologne he was met by two officers of the army sent by the Emperor to welcome him to Germany. He visited the cathedral like any other traveler, and was interested in
Bingen (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany) (search for this): chapter 34
y that I could ever discern. After his departure from England and his short visit to Belgium he proceeded up the Rhine. At Cologne he was met by two officers of the army sent by the Emperor to welcome him to Germany. He visited the cathedral like any other traveler, and was interested in the villages and the ruins of the Rhine; but he cared more for the fortresses of to-day, for Ehrenbreitstein and the bridge of boats than for the legends and castles of romance. We stopped for a night at Bingen, and after dinner he and I walked out into a fair and saw all the village shows; he liked them quite as well as any palace with a history. He questioned the people through me and was curious about their ways, but he had never heard of Mrs. Norton's poem of Bingen on the Rhine. At Frankfort he fell in with some of his Jewish friends, and was quite as much at home with the Seligmans as if they had been princes, though his last host had been the King of the Belgians. Here he was taken to
San Carlo (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 34
lained that she was fond of fancy balls, and had been painted often after going to one. From the villa we returned to the hotel where a tenor singer wanted General Grant to patronize his concert. The General did not think this worth his while, and then the tenor spitefully exclaimed that General Grant might as well go to his concert as to the house of a former prima donna. The Princess was indeed an American girl who had come to Italy to study for the opera; she had sung at La Scala and San Carlo, and pleased the fancy of the Prince, who married her. But she could not go to court, nor be recognized at St. Petersburg. This was why she lived in Italy. This accounted for the portraits of Lucrezia and Semiramide. There was no harm done; the Princess was married; but she had kept back her story when she invited Mrs. Grant. Her companion had an engagement at the time at the Neapolitan opera. Nevertheless the villa was beautiful, the lake was Italian, and the Princess was real, like
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 34
ough Canada in 1865. We spent a day or two at Montreal and Quebec, and then came the first premonitions of the honors destined to be heaped upon him abroad twelve and fourteen years afterward. The Governor-General of Canada offered him a dinner, and put him in the royal pew; the Canadian towns welcomed him almost as if he had saved their country or led their armies. I met him when he landed in England in 1877, and accompanied him, by permission of the Government, wherever he went in Great Britain. I was with him in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France. Always he was the same simple, impassive man, the genuine democrat. The compliments of Kings did not disturb him; the adulation offered by whole populations did not elate him unduly that I could ever discern. After his departure from England and his short visit to Belgium he proceeded up the Rhine. At Cologne he was met by two officers of the army sent by the Emperor to welcome him to Germany. He visited the cathe
France (France) (search for this): chapter 34
then came the first premonitions of the honors destined to be heaped upon him abroad twelve and fourteen years afterward. The Governor-General of Canada offered him a dinner, and put him in the royal pew; the Canadian towns welcomed him almost as if he had saved their country or led their armies. I met him when he landed in England in 1877, and accompanied him, by permission of the Government, wherever he went in Great Britain. I was with him in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France. Always he was the same simple, impassive man, the genuine democrat. The compliments of Kings did not disturb him; the adulation offered by whole populations did not elate him unduly that I could ever discern. After his departure from England and his short visit to Belgium he proceeded up the Rhine. At Cologne he was met by two officers of the army sent by the Emperor to welcome him to Germany. He visited the cathedral like any other traveler, and was interested in the villages and the
Siam (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
er to Ethiopia; but no other man was ever received by both peoples and sovereigns, by savans and merchants, by Presidents and Governor-Generals, by Tycoons and Sultans and Khedives, and school children and work-people and statesmen, like Grant. For him the Pyramids had a special door, and Memphis and Thebes were thrown open as to a successor of the Pharaohs; for him the Pope dispensed with the usual etiquette and welcomed a Protestant and a democrat who did not kneel. With him the King of Siam contracted a personal friendship and kept up a correspondence afterward; while the Emperors of Russia and Germany and Japan, the Viceroy of India and the Magnates of Cuba and Canada and Mexico talked politics to him and religion from their own several standpoints. The greatest potentates of earth laid aside their rules and showed him a courtesy which was due of course in part to the nation he represented; but who ever so represented a nation before? not only the Government, but the plaines
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 34
Canadian towns welcomed him almost as if he had saved their country or led their armies. I met him when he landed in England in 1877, and accompanied him, by permission of the Government, wherever he went in Great Britain. I was with him in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France. Always he was the same simple, impassive man, the genuine democrat. The compliments of Kings did not disturb him; the adulation offered by whole populations did not elate him unduly that I could ever discern. After his departure from England and his short visit to Belgium he proceeded up the Rhine. At Cologne he was met by two officers of the army sent by the Emperor to welcome him to Germany. He visited the cathedral like any other traveler, and was interested in the villages and the ruins of the Rhine; but he cared more for the fortresses of to-day, for Ehrenbreitstein and the bridge of boats than for the legends and castles of romance. We stopped for a night at Bingen, and after dinne
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 34
hants, by Presidents and Governor-Generals, by Tycoons and Sultans and Khedives, and school children and work-people and statesmen, like Grant. For him the Pyramids had a special door, and Memphis and Thebes were thrown open as to a successor of the Pharaohs; for him the Pope dispensed with the usual etiquette and welcomed a Protestant and a democrat who did not kneel. With him the King of Siam contracted a personal friendship and kept up a correspondence afterward; while the Emperors of Russia and Germany and Japan, the Viceroy of India and the Magnates of Cuba and Canada and Mexico talked politics to him and religion from their own several standpoints. The greatest potentates of earth laid aside their rules and showed him a courtesy which was due of course in part to the nation he represented; but who ever so represented a nation before? not only the Government, but the plainest people in it from whom he sprang, whom he claimed as his fellows, whom he believed in as his politi
Geneva, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
us liquid, and what was left was passed to the less important people in the party after the guests had been served. At Geneva for a change he laid the corner-stone of a Protestant church, and dined with an American, Mr. Barbey, at his charming viliazza we looked up at Mt. Blanc and watched the rose-tinted hues of the sunset as they fell on the distant snows. From Geneva we went on to Mt. Blanc. I was curious to discover what interest my chief would display in the world-renowned landscape.he marvels of mountain scenery, for I had never been with him in such regions before. But I was wrong. We traveled from Geneva to Chamounix and then by the Tete Noire to the Valley of the Rhone, in one of the ordinary open Swiss carriages, General ntimental soldier was fully alive to the majestic character of the landscape. From Vernayaz we had intended to return to Geneva, but after reaching the Gorge du Trient, we went up the valley of the Rhone to Brieg. Then we ascended the Simplon, and
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