hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 1,800 0 Browse Search
Nellie Grant 480 0 Browse Search
Jesse Grant 391 1 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 384 0 Browse Search
Sam Grant 360 0 Browse Search
Stanton Grant 352 0 Browse Search
Andrew Johnson 330 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 302 8 Browse Search
Edwin M. Stanton 299 1 Browse Search
Johnson Grant 264 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir. Search the whole document.

Found 53 total hits in 17 results.

1 2
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
, but did not bring out the strong opposition he sometimes shows to views not agreeing with his own. I was followed by General Sickles, who expressed about the same opinion I did. Since that I have talked with several members of Congress who are classed with the Radicals; Schenck and Bidwell for instance. They express the most generous views as to what would be done if the constitutional amendments proposed by Congress were adopted by the Southern States. What was done in the case of Tennessee was an earnest of what would be done in all cases. Even the disqualification to hold office imposed on certain classes by one article of the amendment would, no doubt, be removed at once, except it might be in the cases of the very highest offenders, such, for instance, as those who went abroad to aid in the Rebellion, those who left seats in Congress, etc. All or very nearly all would soon be restored, and so far as security to property and liberty is concerned, all would be restored at
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
mency he had shown them was not forgotten. His present power was not ignored. No Southerner of importance at this time went to Washington without presenting himself at Grant's headquarters, while many visited his house, and to all he proffered the same advice. Formal delegations came from the South to consult with public men upon the course they should pursue. These all came in contact with Grant, who was never unwilling to meet them. Among others was a very important deputation from Arkansas, and Mr. Seward, the Secretary of State, although he was opposed to the amendment, arranged an interview for the party at his own house with Grant. The General-in-Chief spoke very plainly; he declared to the delegates that he was their friend, and as their friend he warned them that the temper of the North was aroused, and if these terms were rejected harsher ones would be imposed. He argued and pleaded with them, and with every Southerner he met, for the sake of the South, for the sake o
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
word was uttered to or by him, but he certainly never in his career appeared more anxious or ardent in any task than in his efforts now to induce the South to accept the terms which he believed the easiest the North would ever offer. The following letter to General Richard Taylor, the brother-in-law of Jefferson Davis, and one of the most influential of the Southern leaders, shows that this view is no imaginative speculation or far-fetched criticism: headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., Nov. 25, 1866. dear General,—Your letter of the 20th is just received. My letter to Pride, with which this is enclosed, answers a part of yours. The day after you left here the President sent for me, as I expected he would after my conversation with the AttorneyGen-eral. I told him my views candidly about the course I thought he should take, in view of the verdict of the late elections. It elicited nothing satisfactory from him, but did not bring out the stro
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
al Richard Taylor, the brother-in-law of Jefferson Davis, and one of the most influential of the Southern leaders, shows that this view is no imaginative speculation or far-fetched criticism: headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., Nov. 25, 1866. dear General,—Your letter of the 20th is just received. My letter to Pride, with which this is enclosed, answers a part of yours. The day after you left here the President sent for me, as I expected he would after my of this opinion still. During these contentions Congress created, or rather revived, the grade of General in the Army for Grant. His nomination was announced to him by the Secretary of War in the following letter: War Department, Washington City, July 25, 1866. General,—The President has signed the bill reviving the grade of General. I have made out and laid your nomination before him, and it will be sent to the Senate this morning. Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton. Lieutenant-
he would after my conversation with the AttorneyGen-eral. I told him my views candidly about the course I thought he should take, in view of the verdict of the late elections. It elicited nothing satisfactory from him, but did not bring out the strong opposition he sometimes shows to views not agreeing with his own. I was followed by General Sickles, who expressed about the same opinion I did. Since that I have talked with several members of Congress who are classed with the Radicals; Schenck and Bidwell for instance. They express the most generous views as to what would be done if the constitutional amendments proposed by Congress were adopted by the Southern States. What was done in the case of Tennessee was an earnest of what would be done in all cases. Even the disqualification to hold office imposed on certain classes by one article of the amendment would, no doubt, be removed at once, except it might be in the cases of the very highest offenders, such, for instance, as
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 5
t step in politics. Grant's first political step was taken when Johnson's plan of reconstruction was rejected by the North. The rejectionad been complete. Not only was the constitutional amendment which Johnson opposed accepted by every Northern State, but a Congress antagonistely known, he declared that their decision should be accepted. Johnson, however, had no idea of submitting. At the beginning he may haveits peril. Grant had, therefore, a double reason for disapproving Johnson's course; not only the deliberate decision of the people was againice of the vast majority of Union men had reached their leader. Johnson, nevertheless, remained as determined as ever. He had appealed tosters the full effect of which is even yet not past. This view of Johnson's conduct was thenceforth steadily maintained by Grant. Without ke was in reality doing more than all the country besides to thwart Johnson's designs. But he thought it prudent not to alarm or provoke the
s, indeed, far more than tact, it was political and patriotic wisdom. And his course throughout all these proceedings was entirely his own. He listened to the advice, or opinions, or persuasions of those who felt they had a right to offer either, but every decision was the result of his own judgment, of his own instinct of what was right. He seemed to me at the time greater than in any emergency of the war, and when I look back upon both crises now, I remain of this opinion still. During these contentions Congress created, or rather revived, the grade of General in the Army for Grant. His nomination was announced to him by the Secretary of War in the following letter: War Department, Washington City, July 25, 1866. General,—The President has signed the bill reviving the grade of General. I have made out and laid your nomination before him, and it will be sent to the Senate this morning. Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton. Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant. Zzz
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 5
was returned by overwhelming majorities. Now Grant was in some respects as absolute a democrat ase President's policy in the end must prevail. Grant, on the other hand, now took a decided stand int to Washington without presenting himself at Grant's headquarters, while many visited his house, interview for the party at his own house with Grant. The General-in-Chief spoke very plainly; he conduct was thenceforth steadily maintained by Grant. Without knowledge that he held this view hismand the army in a way that awoke suspicion in Grant, and although at this time he committed no ill had conquered would have considered treason. Grant frequently expressed this belief to those in his confidence. Believing thus Grant acted not only with moderation and firmness, but with a tacthe very time when many at the North suspected Grant of favoring the President's views, he was in r revived, the grade of General in the Army for Grant. His nomination was announced to him by the S[8 more...]
ter my conversation with the AttorneyGen-eral. I told him my views candidly about the course I thought he should take, in view of the verdict of the late elections. It elicited nothing satisfactory from him, but did not bring out the strong opposition he sometimes shows to views not agreeing with his own. I was followed by General Sickles, who expressed about the same opinion I did. Since that I have talked with several members of Congress who are classed with the Radicals; Schenck and Bidwell for instance. They express the most generous views as to what would be done if the constitutional amendments proposed by Congress were adopted by the Southern States. What was done in the case of Tennessee was an earnest of what would be done in all cases. Even the disqualification to hold office imposed on certain classes by one article of the amendment would, no doubt, be removed at once, except it might be in the cases of the very highest offenders, such, for instance, as those who w
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 5
s, indeed, far more than tact, it was political and patriotic wisdom. And his course throughout all these proceedings was entirely his own. He listened to the advice, or opinions, or persuasions of those who felt they had a right to offer either, but every decision was the result of his own judgment, of his own instinct of what was right. He seemed to me at the time greater than in any emergency of the war, and when I look back upon both crises now, I remain of this opinion still. During these contentions Congress created, or rather revived, the grade of General in the Army for Grant. His nomination was announced to him by the Secretary of War in the following letter: War Department, Washington City, July 25, 1866. General,—The President has signed the bill reviving the grade of General. I have made out and laid your nomination before him, and it will be sent to the Senate this morning. Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton. Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant. Zz
1 2