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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
re are passages in this letter which in ordinary times might have subjected its writer to trial by court martial for insubordination and disrespect to the President. But a court martial must have been composed of men who had fought for the Union, and it is doubtful if one could have been formed to pronounce Grant's course at this juncture other than patriotic and commendable. General Grant to General Pope. my dear General,—Having read Governor Jenkins's address to the citizens of Georgia, I was on the eve of writing you a letter advising his suspension and trial before a military commission when your dispatch announcing that the Governor had given such assurance as to render your order in his case unnecessary was received. . . . My views are that District Commanders are responsible for the faithful execution of the Reconstruction Act of Congress, and that in civil matters I cannot give them an order. I can give them my views, however, for what they are worth, and above al
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ad given such assurance as to render your order in his case unnecessary was received. . . . My views are that District Commanders are responsible for the faithful execution of the Reconstruction Act of Congress, and that in civil matters I cannot give them an order. I can give them my views, however, for what they are worth, and above all, I can advise them of views and opinions here which may serve to put them on their guard. When General Sheridan removed three civil officers in the State of Louisiana, an act which delighted the loyal North, and none more than the supporters of the Congressional Reconstruction Bill in Congress, it created quite a stir, and gave expression to the opinion in other quarters, that he had exceeded his authority. I presume the Attorney-General will give a written opinion on the subject of the powers of District Commanders to remove civil officers and appoint their successors. When he does I will forward it to all the District Commanders. It is very pla
Commanders, and find nothing you have done that does not show prudence and judgment. Rest assured that all you have done meets with the approval of all who wish to see the act of Congress executed in good faith. And so, with caution and moderation mingled with decision and determination, he advised the subordinates whom in civil matters he held that he could not command. They all took his advice with the same deference as if it had been an order, and followed it implicitly. Sheridan, Sickles, Schofield, Pope, and Ord, the five District Commanders, all were in harmony with him and with Congress, although all had once been without any tinge of abolition sentiment and all had sympathized fully with the original magnanimity of Grant. But not only was his influence with the army enormous, his popularity with the entire country was at this time at its height. Doubtless it was the knowledge of this popularity which restrained Johnson from manifesting open resentment at the course
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 8
re Sheridan was in command. He so reported to Grant, who laid the matter before the President and at no such power existed in those commanders. Grant knew personally and positively that Congress hould still do serious mischief. Nevertheless, Grant remained averse to taking or advising any step 21st, the day when he wrote thus to Sheridan, Grant sent the following dispatch to Pope, another oher than patriotic and commendable. General Grant to General Pope. my dear General,—Havinathized fully with the original magnanimity of Grant. But not only was his influence with the art at the course of his subordinate. Wherever Grant went he was attended by enthusiastic crowds; ato the President, who came, as I have said, to Grant's parties with all the rest of the world. At one of Grant's receptions at which Mr. Johnson was present, I recollect also Alexander H. Stephens, down-fallen Confederacy, recently released at Grant's interposition from his prison; the Minister [7 more...]
ever fought against him was ready to do him honor, for every man felt that he owed him his parole, and every officer his sword. All this was known to the President, who came, as I have said, to Grant's parties with all the rest of the world. At one of Grant's receptions at which Mr. Johnson was present, I recollect also Alexander H. Stephens, the Vicedent of the down-fallen Confederacy, recently released at Grant's interposition from his prison; the Minister of the French Emperor, and the family of the Mexican President, Juarez, whom that Emperor had through Grant's interposition resisted in vain; a crowd of fashionable Northern women whose husbands had opposed the war, and every officer of the Union army who was then in Washington. The spectacle of this complex society crowding around the first soldier of the country impressed the Head of the State, and made him understand that it was better to seem, at least, in accord with this man than to be known as his political adversary.
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 8
ongress). The law can decide after district commanders are named in relation to legality of measures resorted to by opposing parties in New Orleans. The President [has now under consideration the question of assignment of district commanders] is now taking steps to put the recent act of Congress into effect. The President directs [that you enforce the law and prevent conflict or riot by judicious use of the military] that [law and] order be preserved and the law enforced. March 9, 1867. U. S. Grant, General. The dispatch finally read: The President directs that order be preserved in New Orleans and the laws enforced. With this Grant sent a copy of the Reconstruction law. This he had not been directed to do by the President. The whole force of the Reconstruction measure lay in the power of the District Commanders to remove civil officers who opposed or obstructed the new law. Mr. Johnson at once took the ground, as I have shown, that no such power existed in those commanders
, another of the District Commanders. There are passages in this letter which in ordinary times might have subjected its writer to trial by court martial for insubordination and disrespect to the President. But a court martial must have been composed of men who had fought for the Union, and it is doubtful if one could have been formed to pronounce Grant's course at this juncture other than patriotic and commendable. General Grant to General Pope. my dear General,—Having read Governor Jenkins's address to the citizens of Georgia, I was on the eve of writing you a letter advising his suspension and trial before a military commission when your dispatch announcing that the Governor had given such assurance as to render your order in his case unnecessary was received. . . . My views are that District Commanders are responsible for the faithful execution of the Reconstruction Act of Congress, and that in civil matters I cannot give them an order. I can give them my views, howev
Alexander H. Stephens (search for this): chapter 8
cs opposed to his own, who once had positively refused to be presented to him, now made efforts to obtain admission to his house; and especially every man who had ever fought against him was ready to do him honor, for every man felt that he owed him his parole, and every officer his sword. All this was known to the President, who came, as I have said, to Grant's parties with all the rest of the world. At one of Grant's receptions at which Mr. Johnson was present, I recollect also Alexander H. Stephens, the Vicedent of the down-fallen Confederacy, recently released at Grant's interposition from his prison; the Minister of the French Emperor, and the family of the Mexican President, Juarez, whom that Emperor had through Grant's interposition resisted in vain; a crowd of fashionable Northern women whose husbands had opposed the war, and every officer of the Union army who was then in Washington. The spectacle of this complex society crowding around the first soldier of the country
P. H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 8
ations of such a course, especially at New Orleans, where Sheridan was in command. He so reported to Grant, who laid the ma those authorities Grant forwarded the following order to Sheridan. I give the text as he originally penciled it, with his is is shown in the following letter of April 21, 1867, to Sheridan: [Private.] my dear General,—As yet no decisio all intricate points to Grant. On this head he wrote to Sheridan in the letter already quoted: On the subject of who cto the intention Johnson had already manifested to remove Sheridan, because that officer was evidently determined to obey the law. On April 21st, the day when he wrote thus to Sheridan, Grant sent the following dispatch to Pope, another of the Dhere which may serve to put them on their guard. When General Sheridan removed three civil officers in the State of Louisian as if it had been an order, and followed it implicitly. Sheridan, Sickles, Schofield, Pope, and Ord, the five District Com
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 8
t Commanders to remove civil officers who opposed or obstructed the new law. Mr. Johnson at once took the ground, as I have shown, that no such power existed in thoscould maintain a sufficient check upon any hostile action of the President. Johnson, however, at once made it certain that his claws had not been so closely paredon law; and every quibble was at once resorted to at the South and indorsed by Johnson, to secure the registration of those whom Congress had intended to disfranchists height. Doubtless it was the knowledge of this popularity which restrained Johnson from manifesting open resentment at the course of his subordinate. Wherever South because he had been magnanimous. It is impossible to understand either Johnson's forbearance or Grant's authority all through this epoch without bearing consrties with all the rest of the world. At one of Grant's receptions at which Mr. Johnson was present, I recollect also Alexander H. Stephens, the Vicedent of the do
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