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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Barton Station (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nseless citizens, until General Mitchel was replaced by a more humane and generous commander in the person of General Buell. The Federals were driven back for a time by Bragg's advance into Kentucky, but they soon returned. In the fall of 1862, a spirited fight, principally with artillery, took place at Little Bear creek, near Tuscumbia, between General Sweeny and General Roddey, and the invaders were driven back to Corinth. Later on, Roddey's troops handsomely engaged the Federals at Barton Station, and again drove them back. In April, 1863, Forrest and Roddey fought Dodge's column at Brown's Ferry and repulsed him; but the Federal leader on his retreat destroyed everything within reach and left the beautiful valley a scene of utter desolation. Leaving Roddey in possession of Brown's Ferry, Forrest started in pursuit of Streight, who was advancing on Rome. Then followed one of the most thrilling and brilliant campaigns of the war. The Federals were overtaken in the lower part
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Tracy; rows of piles obstructed the channel and torpedoes were placed in different parts of the bay. Seven miles from the city, a line of defenses known as Spanish Fort protected the bay shore and Forts Gaines and Morgan stood at the entrance of the bay, four miles apart, the former under the command of Colonel Anderson and the latter under General Page. The ram Tennessee and the gunboats Gaines, Morgan, Selma and others contributed to the defenses. Early in 1864, Farragut arrived off Mobile bay. The campaign against Mobile was planned to consist of an attack by water to be supported by an attack by land forces under General Banks. It was impossible on account of Federal reverses in the Red River campaign to carry out these arrangements immediately. General Canby was placed in command of the West Mississippi division in May, 1864, but was obliged to send a large portion of his force to the defense of Washington, and the attack on Mobile was postponed. On August 2, 1864, Ge
Spanish Fort (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nd Tracy; rows of piles obstructed the channel and torpedoes were placed in different parts of the bay. Seven miles from the city, a line of defenses known as Spanish Fort protected the bay shore and Forts Gaines and Morgan stood at the entrance of the bay, four miles apart, the former under the command of Colonel Anderson and thand at Barrancas. By March, Canby's army amounted to 45,000 men. General Maury had about 9,000 men. His headquarters were at Blakely, about three miles from Spanish Fort, and General Gibson was in command of the fort. To divert attention from their movements against Mobile, concerted attacks were to be made on the interior cand the defenders were assisted by the natural obstructions found in the swampy roads, rendered almost impassable by incessant rains. March 27th, the siege of Spanish Fort commenced. The garrison comprised troops from Louisiana, Arkansas, Georgia, Texas and North Carolina, and the Alabama reserves under General Thomas. The latt
Chambers County (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
then proceeded toward Eutaw. His progress was checked by a serious encounter with Gen. Wirt Adams, and only the firmness of the Second Michigan cavalry saved Croxton from overwhelming defeat. He remained near Northport for a few days and proceeded eastward. April 16th, General Lagrange, who had been sent to reinforce Croxton, reached the vicinity of West Point with 3,000 men. A defense called Fort Tyler, manned by about 104 youths and convalescents, had been erected on the edge of Chambers county and confronted the enemy, whose whole force was directed against it. It was commanded by General Tyler, who resolved to defend it to the bitter end. He was killed, his successor, Captain Gonzalez, was mortally wounded, and then the command devolved upon Captain Parhan, who displayed the same invincible courage; but at last the overwhelming numbers of the enemy enabled them to scale the walls and throng into the little fortress, which was captured, and the Confederate flag torn from its
Turkeytown (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e Federals were overtaken in the lower part of Morgan county, and after a desperate fight of three hours, were driven back into Blount county with a heavy loss of men and baggage. The pursuit was continued and the retreat of the Federals became a rout. They made several desperate stands but were unable to rally their demoralized columns. On, through Blount and Etowah counties, rushed pursuers and pursued, scarcely stopping for food or rest until on May 2d, they rested for the night near Turkeytown, Cherokee county. Forrest, who had only 500 men, by his skillful maneuvers so magnified the appearance of his forces as to secure the surrender of Streight's whole command, numbering 1,466, besides a detachment of 230 men on their way to destroy Rome. In January, 1864, the condition in northern Alabama was such as to evoke an appeal to the war department by the congressional delegation of the State. It is here quoted in full: The undersigned, senators and representatives from
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
resolved by the people of Alabama in convention assembled, That the people of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri be, and are hereby invited to meet the people of the State of Alabama by their delegatey roads, rendered almost impassable by incessant rains. March 27th, the siege of Spanish Fort commenced. The garrison comprised troops from Louisiana, Arkansas, Georgia, Texas and North Carolina, and the Alabama reserves under General Thomas. The latter were afterward relieved by Holtzclaw's brigade. The siege was most stubbornstroy everything which could benefit the Confederate cause. General Wilson proceeded to Montgomery, which he occupied April 12th, and then resumed his march into Georgia. Meanwhile General Croxton marched toward Tuscaloosa, and twenty miles above the city was attacked by Gen. W. H. Jackson's division. Evading this force by a
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
leased by the President's proclamation. Col. Melancthon Smith entered the service of the State of Alabama as a captain of light artillery, July 1, 1861. His military education at West Point rendered him very efficient, and at the recommendation of his superior officers he was made major in August, 1862. Later on, he was promoted to colonel. He was chief of artillery in Hardee's, and afterward Cheatham's corps. He served in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Perryville, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, the battles of the Atlanta campaign and the subsequent campaign in north Alabama and middle Tennessee. After the war he settled in Mobile and engaged in journalism. Appropriate in this connection is the following joint resolution of the Confederate States Congress, approved February 15, 1864: Joint resolution of thanks to the soldiers from the State of Alabama who have re-enlisted for the war: Whereas, In addition to the various brigades and regiments of veteran troops from t
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
hor in the port of Cherbourg, France, he was blockaded by the Kearsarge, which he Challenged and fought, the action terminating disastrously for the Alabama, which sank just after striking her colors. Semmes and 40 of the crew were rescued by an English gentleman and taken to England, where a number of British officers presented him with a sword to replace the one he had thrown into the sea Returning to America, he reached Richmond in January, 1865, and was assigned to the command of the James river fleet, consisting of 3 ironclads and 5 wooden steamers, which guarded the water approach to the city. On the evacuation of Richmond, he blew up his vessels, organized his marines into a brigade and proceeded to join the Confederate forces at Greensboro. After the surrender of Johnston's army, he returned quietly to Mobile, but was seized by order of the United States navy, taken to Washington and imprisoned, but after four months was released by the President's proclamation. Col. Mel
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
and vested in the people of the State of Alabama. Be it resolved by the people of Alabama in convention assembled, That the people of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri be, and are hereby invitedhe attention of his superiors. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart intrusted him with the organization of a battery of horse artillery which he raised in Alabama, Virginia and Maryland. The men from Alabama were commanded by Lieut. William McGregor, a gallant and skillful officer. Pelham fought with great distinction at Williamsburg, First Coness to his country than John Gregg. Admiral Raphael Semmes was another citizen of Alabama who made for himself a brilliant and unique record. He was born in Maryland and was educated at the United States naval academy. He became a resident of Alabama in 1842, and during the war with Mexico was flag lieutenant of Commodore C
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Be it resolved by the people of Alabama in convention assembled, That the people of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri be, and are hereby invited to meet the people of the State of Alabama by their delegates in convention on the 4th day of February, A. D. 1861, at the city of Montgomery in the State of Alabama, for the purpose of consulting with each other as toate and friend of Pelham, and like him left the academy within a short time of his graduation, and offered his services to the Confederacy. He was appointed second lieutenant and sent to Fort Morgan. He soon after went with General Hardee into Missouri, was commissioned major and placed in command of an Arkansas battalion; after the battle of Shiloh, where he fought bravely, he was made colonel of the Eighth Arkansas regiment. He fought gallantly at Perryville and at Murfreesboro, where he wa
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