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year later, gave him that amount of Confederate bonds. At Shiloh he led his regiment until General Gladden, brigade commander, and Col. Wirt Adams were borne wounded from the field, on the first day, when he took command of the brigade. On the second day, after having had two horses shot under him, he was severely wounded. He was well again in time to lead his regiment through the Kentucky campaign, being present in the affairs at Munfordville and at Salt river. In that campaign the brigadehe served efficiently at Nashville. His brigade was one of those selected for the famous rear-guard of infantry, under Walthall, during the retreat. In 1865 he was in the campaign of the Carolinas, still commanding Quarles' old brigade. On the second day of the battle of Bentonville he took command of Walthall's division and led it until the reorganization at Goldsboro, just before the surrender at Durham's Station, near Raleigh. When the surrender occurred he was on his way west to join Ge
e came in at the right place at the right time and in the right way. General Ewell also mentioned the movement in complimentary terms. Colonel Battle was promoted brigadier-general on the field and assigned to command of Rodes' brigade. On the third day at Gettysburg he attacked the enemy at 4:30 in the morning by order of General Ewell, who stated that General Longstreet would go in on the right at the same time. Battle's brigade was one of the first to encounter Grant in the Wilderness. command of the division in the famous assault on the Federal position on Round Top, a movement which he protested against before it was ordered, but carried out with a skillful hand ling of his valiant men, who lost 2,000 of their number. On the third day his prompt dispositions defeated the flank attack of Federal cavalry. At Chickamauga Hood was again wounded, losing a leg, and again the command of the division fell upon Law, who led it with such intrepidity that General Longstreet sent a n
rs of every brigade gained the ditch and there continued the struggle, with but the earthwork separating them from the enemy, until late in the night. In this famous assault Shelley's brigade lost 432 killed and wounded out of 1,100 engaged, but the intrepid commander escaped unhurt, though his horse was shot under him and his clothing pierced by seven balls. At the battle of Nashville, Shelley and his brigade were again distinguished in manful struggle in line on the Hillsboro pike on the 15th, and on the Granny White pike on the 16th. Early in 1865 he was on duty with a fraction of his command at Augusta, Ga., and in April Beauregard reported him at Danville. On April 9th the decimated Alabama regiments of Scott's, Quarles' and Lowrey's brigades were united under his command. These were the consolidated Sixteenth, Thirty-third and Forty-fifth regiments, Colonel Abercrombie; Seventeenth, Colonel Holcombe and consolidated Twenty-seventh, Thirty-fifth, Forty-ninth, Fifty-fifth and
here continued the struggle, with but the earthwork separating them from the enemy, until late in the night. In this famous assault Shelley's brigade lost 432 killed and wounded out of 1,100 engaged, but the intrepid commander escaped unhurt, though his horse was shot under him and his clothing pierced by seven balls. At the battle of Nashville, Shelley and his brigade were again distinguished in manful struggle in line on the Hillsboro pike on the 15th, and on the Granny White pike on the 16th. Early in 1865 he was on duty with a fraction of his command at Augusta, Ga., and in April Beauregard reported him at Danville. On April 9th the decimated Alabama regiments of Scott's, Quarles' and Lowrey's brigades were united under his command. These were the consolidated Sixteenth, Thirty-third and Forty-fifth regiments, Colonel Abercrombie; Seventeenth, Colonel Holcombe and consolidated Twenty-seventh, Thirty-fifth, Forty-ninth, Fifty-fifth and Fifty-seventh, Colonel McAlexander. The
ber 27th, far in front, checking the Federal advance. On the 31st he shared in the splendid record of Cleburne's division, routing the enemy, and on January 1st, sent forward to feel the enemy, he lost nearly 100 men. Cleburne acknowledged great indebtedness to the efficiency of General Wood in this great conflict. The brigade lost 400, out of 1,100 engaged. On June 29th he was in command, and repulsed the enemy at Liberty Gap, Tenn. In the battle of Chickamauga, his brigade was Lowrey's Mississippi regiment, Samuel Adams' Thirty-third Alabama, Breedlove's Forty-fifth Alabama, McGaughey's Sixteenth, and Hawkins' sharpshooters. On the 19th he and his men shared in the intrepid and successful advance of Cleburne, and next day made a desperate attack on Thomas' breastworks, losing 96 killed and 680 wounded in the two days. After this battle he resigned from the army, and was succeeded in command by Gen. M. P. Lowrey. Subsequently he was engaged in the practice of law at Tuscaloosa.
on county, Ala., where he taught school while studying law. On the 11th of January Alabama seceded, and shortly afterward he took a company of State troops to Pensacola, Fla., where he remained two months.. Entering the Confederate service as captain he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the Fourth Alabama, one of the commands greatly distinguished in the first battle of Manassas, where Law was severely wounded. In October, 1861, he was elected colonel of this regiment and commissioned on the 28th of the month. He led this regiment at Seven Pines, and at the battle of Gaines' Mill commanded Whiting's old brigade, consisting of the Second and Eleventh Mississippi, the Fourth Alabama and the Sixth North Carolina This brigade, in company with Hood's of the same division, made the first break in the Union lines on that day of triumph for the Confederates. He had the same command through the rest of the Seven Days battles, including Malvern Hill, also at Second Manassas and at Sharpsburg.
ign, in command of the Fourth brigade of Buckner's division, Hardee's corps, distinguished for valor at Perryville. Said General Hardee: Brigadier-General Wood was severely wounded by the fragment of a shell; his quartermaster, commissary, and adjutant-general were killed, and the three colonels next in rank, on whom the command successively devolved, were wounded. In the Murfreesboro campaign he was warmly engaged at Triune December 27th, far in front, checking the Federal advance. On the 31st he shared in the splendid record of Cleburne's division, routing the enemy, and on January 1st, sent forward to feel the enemy, he lost nearly 100 men. Cleburne acknowledged great indebtedness to the efficiency of General Wood in this great conflict. The brigade lost 400, out of 1,100 engaged. On June 29th he was in command, and repulsed the enemy at Liberty Gap, Tenn. In the battle of Chickamauga, his brigade was Lowrey's Mississippi regiment, Samuel Adams' Thirty-third Alabama, Breedlove
January 1st (search for this): chapter 9
or valor at Perryville. Said General Hardee: Brigadier-General Wood was severely wounded by the fragment of a shell; his quartermaster, commissary, and adjutant-general were killed, and the three colonels next in rank, on whom the command successively devolved, were wounded. In the Murfreesboro campaign he was warmly engaged at Triune December 27th, far in front, checking the Federal advance. On the 31st he shared in the splendid record of Cleburne's division, routing the enemy, and on January 1st, sent forward to feel the enemy, he lost nearly 100 men. Cleburne acknowledged great indebtedness to the efficiency of General Wood in this great conflict. The brigade lost 400, out of 1,100 engaged. On June 29th he was in command, and repulsed the enemy at Liberty Gap, Tenn. In the battle of Chickamauga, his brigade was Lowrey's Mississippi regiment, Samuel Adams' Thirty-third Alabama, Breedlove's Forty-fifth Alabama, McGaughey's Sixteenth, and Hawkins' sharpshooters. On the 19th he
January 10th (search for this): chapter 9
el, Cullen A. Battle, lieutenant-colonel, and Samuel Marks, major. On January 8, 1861, by order of Gov. A. B. Moore, the First regiment was sent against Fort Morgan and the Mount Vernon arsenal, and at the same time the Second regiment was ordered to report at Pensacola to General Chase, commander of Florida troops, and participated in the seizure of the Warrington navy yards and the forts on the Florida coast. The Second regiment captured the navy yard, and Forts Barrancas and McRae on January 10th and 11th, and soon afterward General Chase, Colonel Lomax and Lieutenant-Colonel Battle telegraphed to Senator Jefferson Davis, at Washington, for advice as to the propriety of an attack upon Fort Pickens, and received the reply: In the present condition of affairs Pickens is not worth one drop of blood. Not long after this the Alabama legislature passed the ordinance of secession, and at the same time annulled all military commissions previously issued above the rank of captain. Lomax
January 11th (search for this): chapter 9
ensacola to General Chase, commander of Florida troops, and participated in the seizure of the Warrington navy yards and the forts on the Florida coast. The Second regiment captured the navy yard, and Forts Barrancas and McRae on January 10th and 11th, and soon afterward General Chase, Colonel Lomax and Lieutenant-Colonel Battle telegraphed to Senator Jefferson Davis, at Washington, for advice as to the propriety of an attack upon Fort Pickens, and received the reply: In the present condition o S. C., in 1836; was graduated at the military academy in Charleston in 1856; for three years he was a professor in a military school at Yorkville, and in 1860 removed to Macon county, Ala., where he taught school while studying law. On the 11th of January Alabama seceded, and shortly afterward he took a company of State troops to Pensacola, Fla., where he remained two months.. Entering the Confederate service as captain he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the Fourth Alabama, one of the comma
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