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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Fleetwood (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
. With two pieces of artillery he drove off a gunboat from the vicinity of White House on the 28th, and refreshed his command from the wealth of abandoned Federal stores. After the fight at Malvern Hill he dashed in the enemy's rear, capturing prisoners on all sides, picking up 150 in plain view and within sixty yards of the Monitor. Subsequently the legion was assigned to the cavalry brigade of Gen. Wade Hampton, and under the command of Lieut.-Col. J. F. Waring it won fresh laurels at Fleetwood, Gettysburg, and other famous battlefields, finally surrendering with Wade Hampton at Greensboro, N. C. The army of Northern Virginia was now organized in a more permanent manner by General Lee, and the Mississippi infantry commands were all assigned to Longstreet's corps. In Anderson's division was the Mississippi brigade of General Featherston, including the Twelfth, Sixteenth, Nineteenth regiments and Second battalion. The Second and Eleventh regiments remained in Law's brigade of
Iuka (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ah Valley Seven days battles Second Manassas Harper's Ferry Sharpsburg Fredericksburg. The course of events in this State having been followed to the close of 1862, a brief account should be given of the part which was being taken by Mississippi soldiers in the other States of the Confederacy. In the army which Bragg marched toward Louisville were a number of famous Mississippi commands, which gained distinction in Kentucky and Tennessee while their fellow citizens were fighting at Iuka, Corinth and Vicksburg. The distinctive Mississippi brigade of Bragg's army was that commanded by General Chalmers, including the Fifth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Sykes; Seventh regiment, Col. W. H. Bishop; Ninth regiment, Capt. T. H. Lynam; Tenth regiment, Col. Robert A. Smith; Twenty-ninth regiment, Col. E. C. Walthall; Blythe's regiment, Lieut.-Col. James Moore; Ninth battalion of sharpshooters, Maj. W. C. Richards. This brigade was in Withers' division, Polk's corps. In J. K. Jackson'
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ed with Kershaw's brigade on September 13th the honor of capturing Maryland Heights. This achievement compelled the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and much of the credit for it is due to the gallant Mississippi skirmishers under Maj. J. M. Bradley. The Thirteenth was left in possession of this stronghold while the remainder of the brigade formed line of battle behind Crampton's Gap. In this exploit Barksdale had 960 men engaged, and lost 2 killed and 15 wounded. Law's brigade fought at Boonsboro and on sanguinary field of Sharpsburg. The Second and Eleventh were in the fiercest of the fight at the Dunker Church, both on the 16th and 17th. In the first day's fighting, Hood reported the brave and efficient Col. P. F. Liddell fell mortally wounded; and on the 17th, the two little giant brigades of this division wrestled with a mighty force, not less than two corps of the enemy. In the words of Colonel Law, Colonel Liddell, the gallant and beloved commander of the Eleventh Mississi
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: Service of Mississippians without the State in 1862 Munfordville Perryville Murfreesboro Yorktown Seven Pines Shenandoah Valley Seven days battles Second Manassas Harper's Ferry Sharpsburg Fredericksburg. The course of events in this State having been followed to the close of 1862, a brief account should be given of the part which was being taken by Mississippi soldiers in the other States of the Confederacy. In the army which Bragg marched toward Louisville were a number of famous Mississippi commands, which gained distinction in Kentucky and Tennessee while their fellow citizens were fighting at Iuka, Corinth and Vicksburg. The distinctive Mississippi brigade of Bragg's army was that commanded by General Chalmers, including the Fifth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Sykes; Seventh regiment, Col. W. H. Bishop; Ninth regiment, Capt. T. H. Lynam; Tenth regiment, Col. Robert A. Smith; Twenty-ninth regiment, Col. E. C. Walthall; Blythe's regiment, Lieu
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: Service of Mississippians without the State in 1862 Munfordville Perryville Murfreesboro Yorktown Seven Pines Shenandoah Valley Seven days battles Second Manassas Harper's Ferry Sharpsburg Fredericksburg. The course of events in this State having been followed to the close of 1862, a brief account should be given of the part which was being taken by Mississippi soldiers in the other States of the Confederacy. In the army which Bragg marched toward Louisvie may be mentioned the Sixteenth, under Captain Feltus, which took 228 men into action and lost 144 in killed and wounded. In November, 1862, the Second and Eleventh regiments were detached from Law's brigade and ordered to Richmond. At Fredericksburg, December 11th, Barksdale with his Mississippians occupied the town, and posting his men in rifle-pits, cellars, and behind any shelter that offered, repulsed nine desperate attempts of the enemy to complete their pontoon bridges over the Rap
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
be mentioned the Sixteenth, under Captain Feltus, which took 228 men into action and lost 144 in killed and wounded. In November, 1862, the Second and Eleventh regiments were detached from Law's brigade and ordered to Richmond. At Fredericksburg, December 11th, Barksdale with his Mississippians occupied the town, and posting his men in rifle-pits, cellars, and behind any shelter that offered, repulsed nine desperate attempts of the enemy to complete their pontoon bridges over the Rappahannock river. They were finally driven from their position by a terrific cannonading. The Seventeenth Mississippi, three companies of the Eighteenth and ten sharpshooters from the Thirteenth, were all the troops that were actually engaged defending the crossings in front of the city, there being no place for a greater number. The brigade made another stand on Princess Anne street, after the enemy entered the town. This street-fighting continued until 7 p. m., when Barksdale was ordered back
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
tention to services performed on this occasion and previously by Captain Brown, of Company A, who, with portions of his company, during the campaign killed 12 of the enemy, captured 64 with their arms, and some 25 horses with equipments. At Gaines' Mill, the Second regiment, Col. John M. Stone, and Eleventh, Col. P. H. Liddell, were distinguished in the gallant and successful charge of Law's brigade, and suffered severely, the Second having 21 killed and 79 wounded; the Eleventh 18 killed andy-first upon Captain Brooks. The total loss of the brigade in killed was 91, in wounded 434. This was the heaviest of any brigade engaged at Malvern Hill, and is a sufficient testimonial to the desperate courage of the men. In the fight at Gaines' Mill, the Sixteenth Mississippi and Twenty-first North Carolina were for a time cut off from their brigade by a stream of men going out of action. General Trimble soon found them and led them up to the front. They were passed by two regiments, wh
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
erryville Murfreesboro Yorktown Seven Pines Shenandoah Valley Seven days battles Second Manassas Harper's Ferry Sharpsburg Fredericksburg. The course of events in this State having been followed to the close of 1862, a brief account shoul had 960 men engaged, and lost 2 killed and 15 wounded. Law's brigade fought at Boonsboro and on sanguinary field of Sharpsburg. The Second and Eleventh were in the fiercest of the fight at the Dunker Church, both on the 16th and 17th. In the fiond 27 killed and 127 wounded, a very large part of their total strength. Barksdale's brigade went into the fight at Sharpsburg 891 strong, and lost in killed 33 and in wounded 257. But, although there were not enough of them to make a single contand their dead were much more numerous than their wounded. Col. Carnot Posey, who commanded Featherston's brigade at Sharpsburg, was mentioned by Longstreet as among the most prominently distinguished of his division. His brigade suffered a loss
Pleasant Valley (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
nts won the praise of Wilcox by their gallant repulse of Federal cavalry; and at the battle of Second Manassas Featherston's brigade had the honor of participating in the charge which swept the enemy from the field. The brigade lost 26 killed and 142 wounded. The Second and Eleventh fought with distinction both on August 29th and 30th, losing 15 killed and 153 wounded. Barksdale's brigade did not participate in the fighting of Second Manassas, but after marching through Maryland to Pleasant Valley shared with Kershaw's brigade on September 13th the honor of capturing Maryland Heights. This achievement compelled the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and much of the credit for it is due to the gallant Mississippi skirmishers under Maj. J. M. Bradley. The Thirteenth was left in possession of this stronghold while the remainder of the brigade formed line of battle behind Crampton's Gap. In this exploit Barksdale had 960 men engaged, and lost 2 killed and 15 wounded. Law's brigade fo
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ttle of Second Manassas Featherston's brigade had the honor of participating in the charge which swept the enemy from the field. The brigade lost 26 killed and 142 wounded. The Second and Eleventh fought with distinction both on August 29th and 30th, losing 15 killed and 153 wounded. Barksdale's brigade did not participate in the fighting of Second Manassas, but after marching through Maryland to Pleasant Valley shared with Kershaw's brigade on September 13th the honor of capturing Maryland Heights. This achievement compelled the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and much of the credit for it is due to the gallant Mississippi skirmishers under Maj. J. M. Bradley. The Thirteenth was left in possession of this stronghold while the remainder of the brigade formed line of battle behind Crampton's Gap. In this exploit Barksdale had 960 men engaged, and lost 2 killed and 15 wounded. Law's brigade fought at Boonsboro and on sanguinary field of Sharpsburg. The Second and Eleventh were i
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