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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: Tennessee cavalry West Tennessee expedition Streight's raid Forrest's N at Jackson battles of Okolona and Yazoo West Tennessee again Fort Donelson, Fort Pillow and othehird Ohio, and two companies of the First Middle Tennessee cavalry raised in north Alabama, with ord Richardson of Forrest's cavalry, commanding Tennessee brigade, 550 strong, and Brig.-Gen. L. S. Roa part of the expedition. At this time, west Tennessee was dominated by certain Federal troops, nentucky regiment, commanded by Major Tate of Tennessee, and the Seventh Tennessee, Colonel Duckwortruits of the expedition to north Alabama and Tennessee were 3,360 of the enemy, white and black, kih of October, Forrest's command moved into west Tennessee, and in a few days Buford instituted a bloh he had never heard these names. The State of Tennessee contributed 115,000 soldiers to the Confer came, the fathers, mothers and sisters of Tennessee endured the poverty that it brought with the[19 more...]
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
t Tennessee again Fort Donelson, Fort Pillow and other battles Forrest in North Alabama and Tennessee. The greatest achievements of the cavalry of the State werhen, from Tupelo, Miss., he was ordered by General Beauregard to proceed to north Alabama and middle Tennessee and assume command of the cavalry of Colonels Scott, Wird Ohio, and two companies of the First Middle Tennessee cavalry raised in north Alabama, with orders to proceed south and cut the railroad south of Dalton, Ga., soter at Harrisburg. In a few days Forrest entered upon a campaign through north Alabama and middle Tennessee, the incidents of which show great celerity of movemens and strongly fortified at all points. With the purpose of operating in north Alabama and Tennessee, Forrest crossed the Tennessee river on the 21st of September listening to the echo of Walton's guns. The fruits of the expedition to north Alabama and Tennessee were 3,360 of the enemy, white and black, killed and captured
Richland Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
. Colonel Lathrop, first in command, was killed, and there were many dead in the redoubt from the effect of Morton's shot and shell. The fruits of the victory besides the prisoners were 700 stand of small-arms, 2 pieces of artillery, 16 wagons, 300 horses, and stores of every description. The trestle and blockhouses were burned and the prisoners sent to the rear. With the horses captured, the dismounted men were provided. The blockhouse at Elk river was next burned, and the one at Richland creek, with a garrison of 50 men, was captured. Near Pulaski, Forrest encountered the enemy in the open field, and after a combat, almost a battle, in which his entire command was engaged, the enemy was driven with loss to his fortifications. A careful reconnoissance was made, and it was decided that the position could not be taken without too great a sacrifice of life; hence at nightfall the Confederates were withdrawn and were moved through Fayetteville toward Tullahoma, where Forrest lear
Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
t ball, he was seen to transfer the flag to his left hand and bravely carry it until the surrender. From his headquarters at Tullahoma, March 27, 1863, General Bragg telegraphed the war office at Richmond: Forrest made a successful attack on Brentwood with his division, burned the bridge, destroyed and took all property and arms, and captured 800 prisoners, including 35 officers. General Forrest reported that a flag of truce was sent in, demanding an immediate and unconditional surrender.nemy at bay until the arrival of reinforcements; but with a loss of one man killed and four wounded, he seems to have surrendered without an effort to change position, or to make a resistance worthy of the name of fight. The troops captured at Brentwood were the same who had deserted Colonel Coburn at Thompson's Station. After the surrender, Forrest detached Colonel Lewis, First Tennessee, to make a demonstration on Nashville, and he made important captures and returned safely to headquarte
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
and captured property to McMinnville, a great hue and cry was raised. Troops were hurried to Nashville for its defense, others were sent to Readyville, Statesville, Wilton, and to a point on the olays, the Federal forces having hastily retired. On the 21st he moved to within a few miles of Nashville, destroyed the railroad bridges across Mill creek, skirmished with the garrison at Antioch, captured 97 prisoners, frightened the garrison at Nashville and retired in order. On his return to McMinnville he sent a flag of truce to Murfreesboro. But he could not be found. Gen. Frank C. Armter the surrender, Forrest detached Colonel Lewis, First Tennessee, to make a demonstration on Nashville, and he made important captures and returned safely to headquarters. General Forrest, with thion with General Hood, who was preparing to enter upon his disastrous campaign to Franklin and Nashville. On the 27th of January, 1865, Gen. Richard Taylor, commanding department, assigned General
Athens, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
he Tennessee river on the 21st of September, with Bell's and Lyon's brigades of Buford's division, Rucker's brigade, commanded by Col. D. C. Kelley, and Roddey's troops, commanded by Col. W. A. Johnson. On the 20th, the Fourth Tennessee, Col. W. S. McLemore, and Col. Geo. H. Nixon's regiment, Col. J. B. Biffle, Nineteenth Tennessee, commanding brigade, were ordered to report to General Forrest. About 400 men were dismounted. During the night of the 23d the command reached the town of Athens, Ala., and completely invested it, and at 7 o'clock the next morning an assault was ordered. Hudson's battery, commanded by Lieut. E. S. Walton; a section of Morton's battery, Lieut. Jo. M. Mayson commanding; the other section of Morton's battery, Lieut. Tully Brown commanding, all under the command of Capt. J. W. Morton, opened fire on the Federal position. The troops commenced to advance, when Forrest gave the order to cease firing and to halt, and demanded the surrender of the fort and ga
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
t with his own. In an expedition to west Tennessee, Forrest crossed the Tennessee river on the 15th of December and on the 18th, at Lexington, Tenn., attacked theost brilliant and decisive manner. He was now under orders to recross the Tennessee river. Leaving Middleburg on the 25th, he moved toward McKenzie, Tenn., thence reat promise and of indomitable courage and energy. Forrest recrossed the Tennessee river without being molested. Col. W. K. M. Breckinridge's regiment of Federal e purpose of operating in north Alabama and Tennessee, Forrest crossed the Tennessee river on the 21st of September, with Bell's and Lyon's brigades of Buford's divi and wounded 75 of the enemy. Suspecting that the enemy would cross the Tennessee river, Col. D. C. Kelley's brigade, with a section of Hudson's battery under Lieinto west Tennessee, and in a few days Buford instituted a blockade of the Tennessee river. Fort Heiman and Paris landing were objective points which now had For
McKenzie (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
mings. Cheatham's division was with the army of Tennessee. Colonel Ingersoll's report shows that he was poorly supported, had untrained troops, and was an easy victim to Forrest. The expedition of Forrest to west Tennessee was undertaken to create a diversion in favor of our army in Mississippi, and was accomplished, said General Bragg, in the most brilliant and decisive manner. He was now under orders to recross the Tennessee river. Leaving Middleburg on the 25th, he moved toward McKenzie, Tenn., thence in the direction of Lexington. The Federal commander of the department had in the meantime concentrated large bodies of troops at various points, intending to capture this bold rider who had dared to invade a territory now claimed as their own. On the 31st Forrest moved from Flake's store, sixteen miles north of Lexington, in the direction of that point, and met the advance of the enemy after a march of four miles, at Parker's cross-roads. Here he engaged and fought the briga
Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
f our people from the presence and oppression of the petty commanders of the captured garrisons. On the 16th of October, Forrest's command moved into west Tennessee, and in a few days Buford instituted a blockade of the Tennessee river. Fort Heiman and Paris landing were objective points which now had Forrest's attention. On October 29th, with Chalmers' division, he reached Paris landing, where Buford's division and Lyon's brigade were already on the ground. As usual, his force was magen to insure the safety of Columbus, and 2,000 more for Paducah. Later, on the same day, he reported: The gunboat Undine captured and sunk at Paris landing. Lyon in command at that point with 4,000 men and seven pieces of artillery. Forrest at Heiman with 8,000 men, five 12-pounders and eighteen siege guns. He reported also the capture of the transport Venus, with troops and supplies. His fears multiplied Forrest's forces by four, and easily converted field into siege guns General Forres
Florence, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ers from Bell's brigade were selected to burn the bridge, out of hundreds who offered their services. These gallant fellows went forward in the face of a hot fire from the Federals, applied the torch, and destroyed the bridge. The night was dark, said General Forrest, but my command marched until 10 o'clock by the light of the burning ruins, which illuminated the country for miles. On the 2d of October a demonstration was made on Columbia. The next day the Confederates moved toward Florence, Ala., which was reached without incident on the 5th. The river (forded two weeks earlier) was swollen by recent rains, and the enemy, 15,000 strong, was pressing their rear. The ferryboats were ordered to the mouth of Cypress creek and many troops ferried over, but delay could not be considered. At this emergency, General Forrest ordered all troops north of the river, except the Sixteenth Tennessee, under Col. Andrew N. Wilson, to mount and swim across a slough 70 yards wide to an island,
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