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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ompany, and states that Lieutenant Watts is the coolest officer under fire I ever saw. Taylor's casualties amounted to 16 killed and wounded. The location of Fort Henry was unfortunate, and at the date of the attack the high water in the Tennessee river had surrounded and separated it from the outside line of works. The forces were entirely inadequate for its defense, and General Tilghman made the best defense possible. He maintained it long enough to enable Colonel Heiman to escape with of four 32-pounders, and a battery of eight 32-pounders was commanded by Capt. Jacob Culbertson. Brig.-Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, Brig.-Gen. Simon B. Buckner and Brig.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson commanded the troops, General Floyd in chief command. The Tennessee brigade commanders were Col. A. Heiman, Col. John C. Brown and Col. James E. Bailey, the latter commanding the garrison of the fort; Col. N. B. Forrest commanded the cavalry. The investment of Fort Donelson and the works occupied by the C
Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
second and third assault, the enemy retired, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. He had met three bloody repulses. The principal sufferer on the part of Heiman's brigade was Maney's battery; it was fought without protection and with skill and courage, but his loss, chiefly from sharpshooters, was such that he was afterwa supporting infantry retreated precipitately before the storm of grape and canister poured into their ranks from both batteries. Two hours before this assault on Heiman's brigade, General Buckner reports, the enemy made a vigorous attack on Hanson's position (the Second Kentucky, Col. Roger W. Hanson), but was repulsed with heaved and wounded, among them Col. Thomas M. Gordon of the Third, wounded, and the accomplished Lieut.-Col. W. P. Moore, mortally wounded. General Pillow, leaving Heiman's brigade in the trenches, with the balance of the left division, assisted by Forrest's cavalry, engaged the enemy hotly for two hours and succeeded in driving hi
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ntirely inadequate for its defense, and General Tilghman made the best defense possible. He maintained it long enough to enable Colonel Heiman to escape with the forces, and sacrificed himself and Captain Taylor's company of Tennesseeans. General Grant invested Fort Donelson on the 12th of February, 1862, with 15,000 troops, reinforced that evening by six regiments of infantry and Flag-Officer Foote's fleet of four ironclad and two wooden gunboats—the St. Louis, Carondelet, Louisville, Pittsburg, Tyler and Conestoga. Reinforcements continued to arrive. Wallace's division was brought over from Fort Henry, 10,000 men were sent by General Buell, and the Confederate lines were enveloped by 24,000 troops. General Buckner states, in his report, that at the close of the attack Grant's forces exceeded 50,000. Brig.-Gen. John B. Floyd, of Virginia, commanded the Confederate forces, amounting to 12,000 men. General Pillow commanded the left, General Buckner the right. The Tennesseean
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 2: Loss of the line of the Cumberland battle of Fishing creek death of General Zollicoffer fall of Fort Henry battle of Dover and capitulation of Fort Donelson— New Madrid and Island no.10 evacuation of Nashville. Gen. George B. Crittenden, commanding the Confederate forces in east Tennessee, under date of January 18, 1862, advised Gen. A. S. Johnston from his camp at Beech Grove, Ky., on the north side of the Cumberland river, that he was threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front, and finding it impossible to cross the river, I will have to make the fight on the ground I now occupy. He had under his command 4,000 effective men in two brigades: The First, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, was composed of the Fifteenth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. E. C. Walthall; Nineteenth Tennessee, Col. D. H. Cummings; Twentieth Tennessee, Col. Joel A. Battle; Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Col. S. S. Stanton; Rutledge's battery of four guns, Capt. A. M. Rut
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Island no.10 evacuation of Nashville. Gen. George B. Crittenden, commanding the Confederate forces in east Tennessee, under date of January 18, 1862, advised Gen. A. S. Johnston from his camp at Beech Grove, Ky., on the north side of the Cumberland river, that he was threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front, and finding it impossible to cross the river, I will have to make the fight on the ground I now occupy. He had under his command 4,000 effective men in two brigades: The Fireral Zollicoffer and the peculiar circumstances attending it were very demoralizing to the troops. General Crittenden retreated without molestation from the enemy to his original camp, and during the night fell back to the south side of the Cumberland river, abandoning from necessity his artillery, ammunition, wagons, horses and stores of every description. General Thomas had in action, or in striking distance, the Ninth, Fourteenth, Seventeenth, Thirty-first and Thirty-eighth Ohio regiments;
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
orces were entirely inadequate for its defense, and General Tilghman made the best defense possible. He maintained it long enough to enable Colonel Heiman to escape with the forces, and sacrificed himself and Captain Taylor's company of Tennesseeans. General Grant invested Fort Donelson on the 12th of February, 1862, with 15,000 troops, reinforced that evening by six regiments of infantry and Flag-Officer Foote's fleet of four ironclad and two wooden gunboats—the St. Louis, Carondelet, Louisville, Pittsburg, Tyler and Conestoga. Reinforcements continued to arrive. Wallace's division was brought over from Fort Henry, 10,000 men were sent by General Buell, and the Confederate lines were enveloped by 24,000 troops. General Buckner states, in his report, that at the close of the attack Grant's forces exceeded 50,000. Brig.-Gen. John B. Floyd, of Virginia, commanded the Confederate forces, amounting to 12,000 men. General Pillow commanded the left, General Buckner the right. The
Lexington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nch columbiad was closed and rendered useless, leaving nothing for defense except the ordinary 32-pounders. At this juncture General Tilghman ordered Col. A. Heiman, Tenth Tennessee, the next officer in rank, to retire to Fort Donelson with the entire command, leaving with himself only Capt. Jesse Taylor's artillery company of Tennesseeans, who manned the heavy guns. Captain Taylor's company had fifty men present for duty, with Lieutenants West and Miller. The captain, a native of Lexington, Tenn., was an officer of skill and courage, and the result of the battle with the Federal fleet shows how well his guns were served. Thirty-one shots struck and disabled the flagship Cincinnati, killing 1 and wounding 9; the Essex received 22 shots, one of which passed through the ship, opening one of her boilers, disabling 28 of her crew, and taking off the head of the captain's aide; the St. Louis was struck seven times, and the Carondelet six times. Flag-Officer Foote, in his report of t
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
son in his report said that up to the time (1 o'clock p. m. of the 15th) when we were ordered back to the trenches, our success was complete and our escape secure, but our success was misleading and defeated the wishes of General Johnston. Columbus, Ky., was still held by the Confederate troops, as well as New Madrid and Island No.10. Maj. John P. McCown was detached from Columbus, on the 26th of February, 1862, and ordered to New Madrid, Mo., and placed in command. General Beauregard dispeneral Mackall, had surrendered and were prisoners of war. Nashville had been defended at Fort Donelson. The surrender of one made it necessary to abandon the other. General Johnston determined to concentrate his own troops with those at Columbus, Ky., and at Pensacola, at Corinth, Miss., the junction of the Mobile & Ohio and the Memphis & Charleston railroads. General Grant was moving on the same point, and Gen. Don Carlos Buell, of the Federal army, who had been in front of Bowling Gree
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
f her sons who manned the heavy guns in the defense of Fort Donelson. On the 15th of February a combined attack was made by the two divisions commanded by Generals Pillow and Buckner. General Pillow led the left to the attack, soon followed by the right. Pillow's division constituted two-thirds of the army. The battle raged from daylight to 1 o'clock and to that hour was a great success. It was won by the troops of all of the States. Virginia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas, Alabama, all shared alike in the glory of the achievement. The object of this attack is stated in the report of General Floyd to have been, as the result of a consultation with the officers of divisions and brigades, to dislodge the enemy from the position on our left, and thus to pass our people into the open country. Col. John G. Brown reported that when his brigade moved out on Saturday morning it was provided with three days cooked rations and marched with knapsacks, the purpose being to t
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Henry battle of Dover and capitulation of Fort Donelson— New Madrid and Island no.10 evacuation oe, the next officer in rank, to retire to Fort Donelson with the entire command, leaving with himsof Tennesseeans. General Grant invested Fort Donelson on the 12th of February, 1862, with 15,000ommanded the cavalry. The investment of Fort Donelson and the works occupied by the Confederate ho manned the heavy guns in the defense of Fort Donelson. On the 15th of February a combined att, disputed the advance of General Grant on Fort Donelson with commendable enterprise and skill, no ing his company to a charge on the enemy. Fort Donelson was the opening of a career to Forrest thaowess and heroic actions. He retired from Fort Donelson before its final surrender. General FloydOfficer Foote's experience at Forts Henry and Donelson caused him to keep without the range of Confe of war. Nashville had been defended at Fort Donelson. The surrender of one made it necessary t
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