hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Isaac T. Hopper 944 0 Browse Search
Isaac Tatem Hopper 240 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 60 0 Browse Search
Quaker (Missouri, United States) 58 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Thomas Harrison 42 0 Browse Search
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) 40 0 Browse Search
John P. Darg 39 1 Browse Search
Elias Hicks 37 1 Browse Search
Pierce Butler 36 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life. Search the whole document.

Found 129 total hits in 29 results.

1 2 3
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
d proposed to accompany her. The slave-hunter, who had been left in the street, received a private signal, and the moment she entered the shop, he pounced upon her. Before her situation could be made known to Isaac T. Hopper, she was removed to Baltimore. The last he ever heard of her she was in prison there, awaiting her day of sale, when she was to be transported to New-Orleans. He used to say he did not know which was the most difficult for his mind to conceive of, the cruel depravity mand his confidence misplaced. The following anecdote will illustrate the nature of the relation existing between him and that much abused race. Prince Hopkins, a wood-sawyer of Philadelphia, was claimed as a fugitive slave by John Kinsmore of Baltimore. When Friend Hopper went to the magistrate's office to inquire into the affair, he found the poor fellow in tears. He asked for a private interview, and the alderman gave his consent. When they were alone, Prince confessed that he was the sl
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
The slave of Dr. Rich. In the autumn of 1828, Dr. Rich of Maryland came to Philadelphia with his wife, who was the daughter of an Episcopal clergyman in that city, by the name of Wiltbank. She brought a slave to wait upon her, intending to remas reflection, she said, Then there is nothing left for me to do but to run away; for I am determined never to go back to Maryland. Friend Hopper inquired whether she thought it would be right to leave her mistress without any one to attend upon hegain assured that she was not; and they fell into some general discourse on the subject of slavery. Suppose you came to Maryland and lost your horse, said the Doctor. If you called upon me, and I told you that I knew where he was, but would not infduced them both. In 1801, a sober industrious family of free colored people, living in Pennsylvania on the borders of Maryland, were attacked in the night by a band of kidnappers. The parents were aged, and needed the services of their children f
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
d the number of cases in which he had been employed for fugitives, in one way or another, during his forty years residence in Philadelphia. But enough have been told to illustrate the active benevolence, uncompromising boldness, and ready wit, which characterized this friend of humanity. His accurate knowledge of all laws connected with slavery was so proverbial, that magistrates and lawyers were generally averse to any collision with him on such subjects. In 1810, Benjamin Donahue of Delaware applied to Mr. Barker, mayor of Philadelphia, to assist him in recovering a fugitive, with whose place of residence he was perfectly sure Isaac T. Hopper was acquainted. After a brief correspondence with Friend Hopper, the mayor said to Mr. Donahue, We had better drop this business, like a hot potato; for Mr. Hopper knows more law in such cases as this, than you and I put together. He would often resort to the most unexpected expedients. Upon one occasion, a slave case was brought befo
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
e confessed that he was the slave in question. In the course of his narrative, it appeared that he had been sent into Pennsylvania by his mistress, and had resided there with a relative of hers two years. Friend Hopper told him to dry up his tears, him. When he returned to the office, he informed the magistrate that Prince Hopkins was a free man; having resided in Pennsylvania, with the consent of his mistress, a much longer time than the law required. Mr. Kinsmore was irritated, and demanded deemed the system, which produced them both. In 1801, a sober industrious family of free colored people, living in Pennsylvania on the borders of Maryland, were attacked in the night by a band of kidnappers. The parents were aged, and needed thehide himself under the straw. If such lawless violence had been practised upon any white citizens, the Executive of Pennsylvania would have immediately offered a high reward for the apprehension of the aggressors; but the victims belonged to a des
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
use good enough for her benefactor, she went out to purchase some little luxuries. Hill recommended a particular shop, and proposed to accompany her. The slave-hunter, who had been left in the street, received a private signal, and the moment she entered the shop, he pounced upon her. Before her situation could be made known to Isaac T. Hopper, she was removed to Baltimore. The last he ever heard of her she was in prison there, awaiting her day of sale, when she was to be transported to New-Orleans. He used to say he did not know which was the most difficult for his mind to conceive of, the cruel depravity manifested by the ignorant colored man, or the unscrupulous selfishness of the slaveholder, a man of education, a husband and a father, who could consent to use such a tool for such a purpose: Many more narratives of similar character might be added; for I think he estimated at more than one thousand the number of cases in which he had been employed for fugitives, in one way
Quaker (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ans all free from prejudice against color; and in later times, I think they have not proved themselves at all superior to other sects in their feelings and practice on this subject. Friend Hopper, Joseph Carpenter, and the few who resemble them in this respect, are exceptions to the general character of modern Quakers, not the rule. The following very characteristic anecdote shows how completely Isaac was free from prejudice on account of complexion. It is an unusual thing to see a colored Quaker; for the African temperament is fervid and impressible, and requires more exciting forms of religion. David Maps and his wife, a very worthy couple, were the only colored members of the Yearly Meeting to which Isaac T. Hopper belonged. On the occasion of the annual gathering in Philadelphia, they came with other members of the Society to share the hospitality of his house. A question arose in the family whether Friends of white complexion would object to eating with them. Leave that to m
Isaac T. Hopper (search for this): chapter 38
g to obtain her liberty. He asked if Friend Hopper knew where she then was; and he answered that n my stand, and I intend to keep it. Friend Hopper told him he had no objection; and he was aboutas declined with freezing civility, and Friend Hopper returned to his dwelling. Passing through thet consider myself well treated, replied Friend Hopper. But in this part of the country, we make a d when I am of the same opinion, replied Friend Hopper; but till then thou must excuse me. The fuge by John Kinsmore of Baltimore. When Friend Hopper went to the magistrate's office to inquire intand finish the wood he was sawing, said Friend Hopper. I will be responsible for his appearance wheok as if I was suffering for a master; do I, Mr. Hopper? Though slaveholders had abundant reason thing was done to repair their wrongs. Friend Hopper felt the blood boil in his veins when he heardan was noted for his profane swearing. Friend Hopper had expostulated with him concerning this bad [23 more...]
Isaac Tatem Hopper (search for this): chapter 38
of being brought to Philadelphia. She called to consult with Isaac T. Hopper, and seemed very much disappointed to hear that a residence of runaway, they confessed that she had gone from their house to Isaac T. Hopper. Mr. Wiltbank accordingly waited upon him, and after relating pounced upon her. Before her situation could be made known to Isaac T. Hopper, she was removed to Baltimore. The last he ever heard of her fugitive, with whose place of residence he was perfectly sure Isaac T. Hopper was acquainted. After a brief correspondence with Friend Hoppr. Hopper? Though slaveholders had abundant reason to dread Isaac T. Hopper, as they would a blister of Spanish flies, yet he had no hardnI might have been dragged through the streets like a felon. Isaac T. Hopper was consulted, and a civil suit commenced. Eight hundred doll, were the only colored members of the Yearly Meeting to which Isaac T. Hopper belonged. On the occasion of the annual gathering in Philadel
Benjamin Rush (search for this): chapter 38
such cases as this, than you and I put together. He would often resort to the most unexpected expedients. Upon one occasion, a slave case was brought before Judge Rush, brother of Dr. Benjamin Rush. It seemed likely to terminate in favor of the slaveholder; but Friend Hopper thought he observed that the judge wavered a littleDr. Benjamin Rush. It seemed likely to terminate in favor of the slaveholder; but Friend Hopper thought he observed that the judge wavered a little. He seized that moment to inquire, Hast thou not recently published a legal opinion, in which it is distinctly stated that thou wouldst never seek to sustain a human law, if thou wert convinced that it conflicted with any law in the Bible? I did publish such a statement, replied Judge Rush; and I am ready to abide by it; for iJudge Rush; and I am ready to abide by it; for in all cases, I consider the divine law above the human. Friend Hopper drew from his pocket a small Bible, which he had brought into court for the express purpose, and read in loud distinct tones the following verses: Thou shalt not deliver unto his master the servant which is escaped from his master unto thee: He shall dwell wi
Benjamin Donahue (search for this): chapter 38
ready wit, which characterized this friend of humanity. His accurate knowledge of all laws connected with slavery was so proverbial, that magistrates and lawyers were generally averse to any collision with him on such subjects. In 1810, Benjamin Donahue of Delaware applied to Mr. Barker, mayor of Philadelphia, to assist him in recovering a fugitive, with whose place of residence he was perfectly sure Isaac T. Hopper was acquainted. After a brief correspondence with Friend Hopper, the mayor said to Mr. Donahue, We had better drop this business, like a hot potato; for Mr. Hopper knows more law in such cases as this, than you and I put together. He would often resort to the most unexpected expedients. Upon one occasion, a slave case was brought before Judge Rush, brother of Dr. Benjamin Rush. It seemed likely to terminate in favor of the slaveholder; but Friend Hopper thought he observed that the judge wavered a little. He seized that moment to inquire, Hast thou not recently
1 2 3