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Quaker (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
riend Hopper, you have mistaken the house. No, I have not, he replied. But that is a house of notorious ill fame, said the gentleman. I know it, rejoined he; but nevertheless I have business here. His acquaintance looked surprised, but passed on without further query. A colored girl came to the door. To the inquiry whether her mistress was within, she answered in the affirmative. Tell her I wish to see her, said Friend Hopper. The girl was evidently astonished at a visitor in Quaker costume, and of such grave demeanor; but she went and did the errand. A message was returned that her mistress was engaged and could not see any one. Where is she? he inquired. The girl replied that she was up-stairs. I will go to her, said the importunate messenger. The mistress of the house heard him, and leaning over the balustrade of the stairs, she screamed out, What do you want with me, sir? In very loud tones he answered, James Simpson, a minister of the Society of Friends,
Isaac T. Hopper (search for this): chapter 44
for vicious people; and Isaac T. Hopper was appointed to collect an audience. In the course of this mission, he knocked at the door of a very infamous house. A gentleman who was acquainted with him was passing by, and he stopped to say, Friend Hopper, you have mistaken the house. No, I have not, he replied. But that is a house of notorious ill fame, said the gentleman. I know it, rejoined he; but nevertheless I have business here. His acquaintance looked surprised, but passed on without further query. A colored girl came to the door. To the inquiry whether her mistress was within, she answered in the affirmative. Tell her I wish to see her, said Friend Hopper. The girl was evidently astonished at a visitor in Quaker costume, and of such grave demeanor; but she went and did the errand. A message was returned that her mistress was engaged and could not see any one. Where is she? he inquired. The girl replied that she was up-stairs. I will go to her, said the import
Isaac Tatem Hopper (search for this): chapter 44
The Uncomplimentary invitation. A preacher of the Society of Friends felt impressed with the duty of calling a meeting for vicious people; and Isaac T. Hopper was appointed to collect an audience. In the course of this mission, he knocked at the door of a very infamous house. A gentleman who was acquainted with him was passing by, and he stopped to say, Friend Hopper, you have mistaken the house. No, I have not, he replied. But that is a house of notorious ill fame, said the gentleman. I know it, rejoined he; but nevertheless I have business here. His acquaintance looked surprised, but passed on without further query. A colored girl came to the door. To the inquiry whether her mistress was within, she answered in the affirmative. Tell her I wish to see her, said Friend Hopper. The girl was evidently astonished at a visitor in Quaker costume, and of such grave demeanor; but she went and did the errand. A message was returned that her mistress was engaged and co
James Simpson (search for this): chapter 44
s within, she answered in the affirmative. Tell her I wish to see her, said Friend Hopper. The girl was evidently astonished at a visitor in Quaker costume, and of such grave demeanor; but she went and did the errand. A message was returned that her mistress was engaged and could not see any one. Where is she? he inquired. The girl replied that she was up-stairs. I will go to her, said the importunate messenger. The mistress of the house heard him, and leaning over the balustrade of the stairs, she screamed out, What do you want with me, sir? In very loud tones he answered, James Simpson, a minister of the Society of Friends, has appointed a meeting to be held this afternoon, in Penrose store, Almond-street. It is intended for publicans, sinners, and harlots. I want thee to be there, and bring thy whole household with thee. Wilt thou come? She promised that she would; and he afterward saw her at the meeting melted into tears by the direct and affectionate preaching.