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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
A soldier's account of the Gettysburg campaign. Letter from George W. Beale (son of General R. L. T. Beale) four miles Northwest of Williamsport, Md. July 13th, 1863. Dearest mother,—My last letter to you was written in Loudoun county, and so hurriedly and under such circumstances as to render it very brief and unsatisfactory, I have no doubt. In that letter I informed you of the many trials and dangers we had passed through, and how the tender mercy of our indulgent Heavenly Parent had so wonderfully attended us, and how through it we had been spared in health and soundness. How few and trivial the sufferings and dangers I then referred to, compared with those through which we have since passed; and if such were possible, how more boundless and vast the compassionate love and care displayed towards us by Him who ordaineth all things! We, are yet alive and well! Surely our hearts should melt in gratitude to God, for the privilege of being able to say so. I am this mo
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
Colonel Payne, Captain Billingsly of this regiment, and several subalterns were captured from us. We marched all night, and the next day, and arrived in front of Carlisle about dark. It was here we confidently expected to meet our troops; but what was our surprise, and almost dismay, when we learned that General Ewell had left t Lee in the rear, and traveled till nearly light, when we stopped on the summit of South Mountain. The mountain side was yet illumined by the light from burning Carlisle. Tired—exhausted as I was, I could not but reflect, as I looked back upon the burning town, upon the wickedness, the horrors of this fell war. Frightened women in terror from burning homes, could not have suffered much more keenly, than many of the vandal rebels who with fiendish delight (?) beheld the conflagration in Carlisle that night. Truly, I was made to feel unhappy, indeed; God grant that terrible war may lead to early peace! Next morning found us upon the mountain, more
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
ains below Emmettsburg. Were in the saddle all next night, reached Lightesburg where we learned we were close upon the enemy, who had that day captured about thirty of our wagons, besides many prisoners. Next day we followed the enemy towards Hagerstown, where we came up with him. This day we captured many prisoners, who with those caught yesterday amount to nearly three hundred. The fight at Hagerstown lasted nearly all day. Our company was in three distinct charges. We killed and captured Hagerstown lasted nearly all day. Our company was in three distinct charges. We killed and captured a great many Yankees. In the evening we drove the Yankees off, and General Stuart ordered us to follow them up. Our brigade endeavoured to take a piece of artillery. We were front. We charged up almost to the mouth of the piece. They poured the grape or canister into us. When we got close up to the gun we found it so well protected by sharpshooters and cavalry, that we could not hold it; we accordingly left the pike and formed in the field, and fought until our support came up, when the enem
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
ite you such a letter as our long silence should lead you to expect. Upon the very day I wrote to you last, our brigade, with General F. Lee's and Hampton's, started from Lovdon in a southerly direction, encamping at night, for a few hours, near Salem, in Fauquier. This move, considering the direction our army was marching, filled us all with astonishment, and was one, the mystery of which, none of us could understand. The fact that General Stuart headed the expedition led many of us to believe that our journey southward would not continue long. Leaving Salem at 3 o'clock A. M., Thursday morning, June ——, we moved against Thoroughfare Gap, and crossing the rugged mountains, attacked a wagon train, but did nothing more than throw some shells in among them. That night was rainy and disagreeable, and we spent it without shelters or fires. Next day we moved to attack the Yankees at Bristoe Station, but they had fled before we got there. Continuing the march that day, we halted
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
nemy were routed, and most of them captured, and many stores fell into our hands, which were all destroyed or consumed. The men, now well-nigh exhausted, were allowed four hours rest, after which we started and proceeded towards Hanover, in Pennsylvania. Reaching Hanover we learned that the enemy held the town in force. Both men and horses being worn out, all of us regarded the prospect of a fight with no little regret and anxiety. No time was to be lost though, and whilst I was sent with tain M. yet; he will show himself soon, though, I reckon. I wish, as you say, General Lee would not let the Yankees come back to the Northern Neck again. Unhappy as I was made to feel by hearing of the unauthorized depredations of our men in Pennsylvania, upon the private rights of the people, I had much rather those people should be made to feel the horrors of war than that an armed Yankee should ever tread our soil again. If we should be so fortunate as to gain a great victory here, I do no
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
A soldier's account of the Gettysburg campaign. Letter from George W. Beale (son of General R. L. T. Beale) four miles Northwest of Williamsport, Md. July 13th, 1863. Dearest mother,—My last letter to you was written in Loudoun county, and so hurriedly and under such circumstances as to render it very brief and unsatisfactory, I have no doubt. In that letter I informed you of the many trials and dangers we had passed through, and how the tender mercy of our indulgent Heavenly Parent had so wonderfully attended us, and how through it we had been spared in health and soundness. How few and trivial the sufferings and dangers I then referred to, compared with those through which we have since passed; and if such were possible, how more boundless and vast the compassionate love and care displayed towards us by Him who ordaineth all things! We, are yet alive and well! Surely our hearts should melt in gratitude to God, for the privilege of being able to say so. I am this m
Occoquan River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
our journey southward would not continue long. Leaving Salem at 3 o'clock A. M., Thursday morning, June ——, we moved against Thoroughfare Gap, and crossing the rugged mountains, attacked a wagon train, but did nothing more than throw some shells in among them. That night was rainy and disagreeable, and we spent it without shelters or fires. Next day we moved to attack the Yankees at Bristoe Station, but they had fled before we got there. Continuing the march that day, we halted near Occoquan for the night. Started very early Saturday morning, attacked the enemy at Fairfax Court-house, routed them, capturing many prisoners and stores, and secured rations, for which the men were suffering much. There were many nice things taken here and speedily consumed by us ravenous rebbs. Being in anticipation of attack by the enemy all the time we were at the place, no opportunity was allowed many of us to secure the valuable merchandise with which many of the stores were well supplied.
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
who brought with him many prisoners, among them a great many contrabands, some of whom were recognized and claimed. There were some known to me, among whom was one of Uncle Tom's, two of F. W. Cox's, one of J. W. Branson's, besides several free negroes. From Rockville we continued the march towards the Baltimore and Ohio railroad; traveled all night, and crossed the track, a part of which we destroyed next morning. This day we traveled all day, and had a sharp fight in the evening at Westminster, in which the Fourth regiment lost two Lieutenants. The enemy were routed, and most of them captured, and many stores fell into our hands, which were all destroyed or consumed. The men, now well-nigh exhausted, were allowed four hours rest, after which we started and proceeded towards Hanover, in Pennsylvania. Reaching Hanover we learned that the enemy held the town in force. Both men and horses being worn out, all of us regarded the prospect of a fight with no little regret and anx
Hanover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
enants. The enemy were routed, and most of them captured, and many stores fell into our hands, which were all destroyed or consumed. The men, now well-nigh exhausted, were allowed four hours rest, after which we started and proceeded towards Hanover, in Pennsylvania. Reaching Hanover we learned that the enemy held the town in force. Both men and horses being worn out, all of us regarded the prospect of a fight with no little regret and anxiety. No time was to be lost though, and whilst IHanover we learned that the enemy held the town in force. Both men and horses being worn out, all of us regarded the prospect of a fight with no little regret and anxiety. No time was to be lost though, and whilst I was sent with a small party to the left to prevent the enemy's flanking us from that direction, the Thirteenth and Ninth Virginia, and Second North Carolina regiments, were ordered to charge. The charge was made, and the enemy driven from the place. But our men were soon turned upon by the enemy, again, or else attacked by another force, and driven off in confusion. We lost many men, principally from the North Carolina regiment. Our company lost E. D. Brown, wounded badly in the leg, and W
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
y expectation of being called upon to fight. Meanwhile the rain is descending in torrents, so dampening my paper as to render it almost useless to attempt to use ink upon it. Under these circumstances, I am sure I will not be able to write you such a letter as our long silence should lead you to expect. Upon the very day I wrote to you last, our brigade, with General F. Lee's and Hampton's, started from Lovdon in a southerly direction, encamping at night, for a few hours, near Salem, in Fauquier. This move, considering the direction our army was marching, filled us all with astonishment, and was one, the mystery of which, none of us could understand. The fact that General Stuart headed the expedition led many of us to believe that our journey southward would not continue long. Leaving Salem at 3 o'clock A. M., Thursday morning, June ——, we moved against Thoroughfare Gap, and crossing the rugged mountains, attacked a wagon train, but did nothing more than throw some shells in a
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