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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
rice. New York: D. Van Nostrand. A narrative of this famous old regiment (formerly the Second Cavalry) could not fail to be of interest, and we commend the beautifully gotten up volume as worthy of a place on the shelves of our War Libraries. But we must express now our regret that the author could not drop the partisan and write more in the spirit of the true soldier, and our purpose to show up hereafter some of his more glaring perversions of the truth of history. Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, in the war of the rebellion; 1861-1862. By General George H. Gordon. Boston: James R. Osgood & Co. We reserve for future review this admirably written and very interesting book which is a part of the series of which the Army of Virginia and A War Diary form a continuous history of the war. General Gordon writes with a free pen, and some of his criticisms on the blundering stupidity of political managers in Washington, acting upon the colossal incapacity of their favorites in the
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
he facts and figures we have given him, and to which we shall hereafter call special attention. Meantime we advise all interested in such matters to procure the book, that they may see for themselves what this foreign prince has to say of Chancellorsville, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, etc. Virginia Historical collections. Vol. III. New series. Dinwiddie Papers. Vol. I. 1751-1755. Edited by R. A. Brock, Correspondent Secretary, and published by the Virginia Historical Society. This book (freaders some of its good things, such as the account of The Merimac and the Monitor, &c. A Byrd's-eye view of our civil war. By Colonel T. A. Dodge, U. S. A. Boston: lames R. Osgood & Co. After reading Colonel Dodge's admirable book on Chancellorsville, we were prepared to find in this new publication a well written, calm, and unusually fair book. We have not been disappointed, and while we are not, of course, prepared to accept all of Colonel Dodge's statements, or to endorse all of his
ugh West, Johnston & Co., Richmond, this beautifully gotten up book, and have time and space now only to say that a slight dipping into its pages shows conclusively that our gallant Confederate tar knows how to wield a pen as well as how to sail or fight a ship, and has produced a book of rare interest and decided historic value. We mean to give it a careful reading, and shall hereafter copy for our readers some of its good things, such as the account of The Merimac and the Monitor, &c. A Byrd's-eye view of our civil war. By Colonel T. A. Dodge, U. S. A. Boston: lames R. Osgood & Co. After reading Colonel Dodge's admirable book on Chancellorsville, we were prepared to find in this new publication a well written, calm, and unusually fair book. We have not been disappointed, and while we are not, of course, prepared to accept all of Colonel Dodge's statements, or to endorse all of his criticisms, we do not hesitate to commend the book most warmly as the work of an able, pains-tak
to procure the book, that they may see for themselves what this foreign prince has to say of Chancellorsville, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, etc. Virginia Historical collections. Vol. III. New series. Dinwiddie Papers. Vol. I. 1751-1755. Edited by R. A. Brock, Correspondent Secretary, and published by the Virginia Historical Society. This book (for a copy of which we are indebted to the editor) is a credit to all concerned. The printer (W. Ellis Jones) and the binders (J. W. Randolph & English) have done their work admirably, while Mr. Brock displays his usual taste and historic research in his introduction and in his valuable notes on the text. It is needless to add that a collection of letters and papers concerning events which transpired during the important and stirring period of colonial history from 1751 to 1755 cannot fail to be of deep interest and permanent historic value, and as these papers are published for the first time from the original Mss. they are only now br
use them, and they have very properly accompanied the volume with a fine likeness of the great philanthropist, and his autograph letter making the valuable gift. The few extra copies for sale will, of course, be bought up at once, as no historic collection could be called complete without the Dinwiddie Papers. recollections of A naval officer. 1841-1865. By Captain William Hamar Parker. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. We have received, with the compliments of the author, through West, Johnston & Co., Richmond, this beautifully gotten up book, and have time and space now only to say that a slight dipping into its pages shows conclusively that our gallant Confederate tar knows how to wield a pen as well as how to sail or fight a ship, and has produced a book of rare interest and decided historic value. We mean to give it a careful reading, and shall hereafter copy for our readers some of its good things, such as the account of The Merimac and the Monitor, &c. A Byrd's-e
e mean to give it a careful reading, and shall hereafter copy for our readers some of its good things, such as the account of The Merimac and the Monitor, &c. A Byrd's-eye view of our civil war. By Colonel T. A. Dodge, U. S. A. Boston: lames R. Osgood & Co. After reading Colonel Dodge's admirable book on Chancellorsville, we were prepared to find in this new publication a well written, calm, and unusually fair book. We have not been disappointed, and while we are not, of course, preparedendeavored to ascertain, and frankly to tell the truth about our late war. We propose hereafter to make copious extracts from Colonel Dodge and to publish a fuller review of his interesting and valuable contribution to a history of the war. Osgood & Co, have done their part of the work admirably, and have produced a fine specimen of the book-makers' art. across the continent with the Fifth cavalry. By Captain George F. Price. New York: D. Van Nostrand. A narrative of this famous ol
William Hamar Parker (search for this): chapter 86
bted to the enlightened liberality of W. W. Corcoran, Esqr., for their possession of these papers and their ability to use them, and they have very properly accompanied the volume with a fine likeness of the great philanthropist, and his autograph letter making the valuable gift. The few extra copies for sale will, of course, be bought up at once, as no historic collection could be called complete without the Dinwiddie Papers. recollections of A naval officer. 1841-1865. By Captain William Hamar Parker. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. We have received, with the compliments of the author, through West, Johnston & Co., Richmond, this beautifully gotten up book, and have time and space now only to say that a slight dipping into its pages shows conclusively that our gallant Confederate tar knows how to wield a pen as well as how to sail or fight a ship, and has produced a book of rare interest and decided historic value. We mean to give it a careful reading, and shall hereaf
D. Nostrand (search for this): chapter 86
, pains-taking soldier, who has honestly endeavored to ascertain, and frankly to tell the truth about our late war. We propose hereafter to make copious extracts from Colonel Dodge and to publish a fuller review of his interesting and valuable contribution to a history of the war. Osgood & Co, have done their part of the work admirably, and have produced a fine specimen of the book-makers' art. across the continent with the Fifth cavalry. By Captain George F. Price. New York: D. Van Nostrand. A narrative of this famous old regiment (formerly the Second Cavalry) could not fail to be of interest, and we commend the beautifully gotten up volume as worthy of a place on the shelves of our War Libraries. But we must express now our regret that the author could not drop the partisan and write more in the spirit of the true soldier, and our purpose to show up hereafter some of his more glaring perversions of the truth of history. Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, in the war of t
J. W. Randolph (search for this): chapter 86
n such matters to procure the book, that they may see for themselves what this foreign prince has to say of Chancellorsville, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, etc. Virginia Historical collections. Vol. III. New series. Dinwiddie Papers. Vol. I. 1751-1755. Edited by R. A. Brock, Correspondent Secretary, and published by the Virginia Historical Society. This book (for a copy of which we are indebted to the editor) is a credit to all concerned. The printer (W. Ellis Jones) and the binders (J. W. Randolph & English) have done their work admirably, while Mr. Brock displays his usual taste and historic research in his introduction and in his valuable notes on the text. It is needless to add that a collection of letters and papers concerning events which transpired during the important and stirring period of colonial history from 1751 to 1755 cannot fail to be of deep interest and permanent historic value, and as these papers are published for the first time from the original Mss. they ar
p the partisan and write more in the spirit of the true soldier, and our purpose to show up hereafter some of his more glaring perversions of the truth of history. Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, in the war of the rebellion; 1861-1862. By General George H. Gordon. Boston: James R. Osgood & Co. We reserve for future review this admirably written and very interesting book which is a part of the series of which the Army of Virginia and A War Diary form a continuous history of the war. General Gordon writes with a free pen, and some of his criticisms on the blundering stupidity of political managers in Washington, acting upon the colossal incapacity of their favorites in the field, are very rich. We commend the book as well worth reading and preserving. the century keeps up its high standard of excellence, and the November number contains a very readable paper on the retreat from Richmond, and capture of President Davis, by his private secretary, Burton N. Harrison. Zzz
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