hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 390 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 278 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 256 2 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 188 0 Browse Search
H. B. McClellan 172 2 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 160 2 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 150 2 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 147 1 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 130 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 130 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 74 total hits in 30 results.

1 2 3
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
shed headquarters with General W. H. Jackson, commanding the cavalry of his army, and on whose staff the writer at that time was A. A. General. It was a dark and rainy night, and when the courier came up and reported that the last of the army had crossed and the pontoons had been taken up, Hood remarked to the circle of officers present: I once more feel glorious; I am north of the Chattahoochie. Then we lay down for the night, to resume on the next morning in good earnest the march into Tennessee which terminated so disastrously at Nashville. Conclusion. In conclusion of this sketch, which is written purely from recollection, and partly from memoranda made at the time, I deem it not amiss to say in justification of General Bragg's discipline that it was simply the misfortune of the Confederacy that she had so few officers like him to carry out and enforce her laws, and thereby render her arms what they should have been, efficient and perfect. Captious critics, the most of
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. By Major E. T. Sykes. The army at Dalton. The Army of Tennessee fell back and went into winter quarters at Dalton, Georgia, forty miles distant from Chattanooga, and where the Georgia State road connects with the East Tennessee railroad. Extract from a letter of General Bragg to the writer, dated February 8th, 1873: In our retreat from Missionary Ridge, the enemy could make but a feeble pursuit, for want of artillery horses (Grant's report). At the mountain gorge near Ringgold, I believed he could be successfully repulsed, and the army quickly withdrawn. General Cleburn, one of the best and truest soldiers in our cause, was placed at that point in command of the rear guard. Late at night, hours after all the army was at rest, my information being all in, I called for a reliable confidential staff officer, and gave him verbal directions to ride immediately to Cleburn, about three (3) miles in my rear, at this mountain go
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
o summarily to dispense with his services, and hence immediately called him to Richmond in the capacity of military adviser. Thus ended the connection of General Bragg with the Army of the West, or, as then more properly termed, the Army of Northern Georgia. General Bragg relieved of command and Susequent visit to the army. He never, subsequent to that time, made but one visit to his old and to him cherished command, and then to find it sadly changed—a visit pregnant with the issues of ederacy. It was at or about the time of the removal of General Johnston from, and the substitution of the bravest of the brave, the gallant J. B. Hood, to the command of the army with the rank of General. General Hood Commanding army of Northern Georgia. Hood was offered a sacrifice on the shrine of his country, and be it said to his glory and honor that, knowing it, he, for his country's good, unhesitatingly accepted its consequences. On his assumption of the command of the army, if I
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
y record with the masses, who were ignorant of the situation, the most if not all of whom were his admirers, and to the ability of his little army, to give battle to the overwhelming odds under Sherman, for the one last lingering hope of holding Atlanta, the key to the Confederacy. And, though failing in the end, gallantly did he redeem his responsible pledge. The venture was hazardous in the extreme, and it required brave officers to meet the emergency. 'Twas then that the brave and chivaied and true men, were promoted to the rank of general officers, in which capacity their military skill was more urgently needed and their valuable services could at the same time be rewarded The battles of the 22d and 28th of July, 1864, around Atlanta, and at Jonesboroa on the 31st August following, attested the wisdom of these appointments. And although we were not successful in the immediate results of the battlefield, we showed to the haughty enemy that all chivalry was not buried in the
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ral Bragg. By Major E. T. Sykes. The army at Dalton. The Army of Tennessee fell back and went into winter quarters at Dalton, Georgia, forty miles distant from Chattanooga, and where the Georgia State road connects with the East Tennessee railroad. Extract from a letter of General Bragg to the writer, dated February 8th, 1873: In our retreat from Missionary Ridge, the enemy could make but a feeble pursuit, for want of artillery horses (Grant's report). At the mountain gorge near Ringgold, I believed he could be successfully repulsed, and the army quickly withdrawn. General Cleburn, one of the best and truest soldiers in our cause, was placed at that point in command of the rear guard. Late at night, hours after all the army was at rest, my information being all in, I called for a reliable confidential staff officer, and gave him verbal directions to ride immediately to Cleburn, about three (3) miles in my rear, at this mountain gorge, and give him my positive orders to ho
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
commanding the cavalry of his army, and on whose staff the writer at that time was A. A. General. It was a dark and rainy night, and when the courier came up and reported that the last of the army had crossed and the pontoons had been taken up, Hood remarked to the circle of officers present: I once more feel glorious; I am north of the Chattahoochie. Then we lay down for the night, to resume on the next morning in good earnest the march into Tennessee which terminated so disastrously at Nashville. Conclusion. In conclusion of this sketch, which is written purely from recollection, and partly from memoranda made at the time, I deem it not amiss to say in justification of General Bragg's discipline that it was simply the misfortune of the Confederacy that she had so few officers like him to carry out and enforce her laws, and thereby render her arms what they should have been, efficient and perfect. Captious critics, the most of whom were in the rear, could not appreciate th
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. By Major E. T. Sykes. The army at Dalton. The Army of Tennessee fell back and went into winter quarters at Dalton, Georgia, forty miles distant from Chattanooga, and where the Georgia State road connects with the East Tennessee railroad. Extract from a letter of General Bragg to the writer, dated February 8th, 1873: In our retreat from Missionary Ridge, the enemy could make but a feeble pursuit, for want of artillery horses (Grant'Dalton, Georgia, forty miles distant from Chattanooga, and where the Georgia State road connects with the East Tennessee railroad. Extract from a letter of General Bragg to the writer, dated February 8th, 1873: In our retreat from Missionary Ridge, the enemy could make but a feeble pursuit, for want of artillery horses (Grant's report). At the mountain gorge near Ringgold, I believed he could be successfully repulsed, and the army quickly withdrawn. General Cleburn, one of the best and truest soldiers in our cause, was placed at that point in command of the rear guard. Late at night, hours after all the army was at rest, my information being all in, I called for a reliable confidential staff officer, and gave him verbal directions to ride immediately to Cleburn, about three (3) miles in my rear, at this mountain g
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
A good soldier, by obedience, without substituting his own crude notions, defeats the enemy and saves an army from disaster. And mark the credit he gets for it. The Confederate Congress passed a vote of thanks to the gallant Cleburn and his command for saving Bragg's army. Not to this day has it ever been known that he did it in obedience to orders and against his judgment, which does not detract from, but adds to his fame. Captain Samuel A. Harris, Assistant Adjutant-General, of Montgomery, Alabama, was the officer who delivered the order. He is now an Episcopal clergyman, with the largest congregation in New Orleans, and has recently repeated the whole matter to me as distinctly as if it had occurred yesterday. Soon after, General Bragg, appreciating his relations to the service, and feeling that a portion of his troops were dissatisfied with and disposed to criticise his military operations, to allay all apprehensions, patriotically requested the President to relieve him fro
Jonesboro (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Lee, who merited the high compliments of President Davis, paid him before the Legislature of Mississippi the year previous, was called to the command of Hood's corps, and our equally gallant and intrepid Jacob H. Sharp and others, tried and true men, were promoted to the rank of general officers, in which capacity their military skill was more urgently needed and their valuable services could at the same time be rewarded The battles of the 22d and 28th of July, 1864, around Atlanta, and at Jonesboroa on the 31st August following, attested the wisdom of these appointments. And although we were not successful in the immediate results of the battlefield, we showed to the haughty enemy that all chivalry was not buried in the grave of Charlemagne, but some, at least, remained to adorn the brow and make resplendent the character of the Southern officer and soldier. That character to-day of the Southerner which makes him respected abroad and by his enemies, and the latter is by every hellis
W. H. Jackson (search for this): chapter 1
g for her rights, and revere the tottering steps of the old man who in years to come will tell in nursery tales to his anxiously listening offspring of the hardships he endured and the dangers he braved in behalf of his country's honor. And none more than the one of whom I am immediately speaking can truthfully and proudly relate them of himself. The writer will never forget the remark made by Hood the night after he crossed the Chattahoochie and had established headquarters with General W. H. Jackson, commanding the cavalry of his army, and on whose staff the writer at that time was A. A. General. It was a dark and rainy night, and when the courier came up and reported that the last of the army had crossed and the pontoons had been taken up, Hood remarked to the circle of officers present: I once more feel glorious; I am north of the Chattahoochie. Then we lay down for the night, to resume on the next morning in good earnest the march into Tennessee which terminated so disastro
1 2 3