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Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 100
oubles from outside that were pressing his residential land. His most intimate historical knowledge was with his native Scotland's long and sore, but stern and ultimately successful struggle to preserve her integrity, and his impulse and judgment cls heroic comrades now sought to be perpetuated. I attribute the partiality of my selection for the trust my friend from Scotland has confided to me, to the fact that be knew me to have been not only an officer under his brother, but a constant frien Remarks by Mr. Watts. I have been deputed by my friend Mr. James Smith, under whose auspices I have come from old Scotland to take part in this most touching ceremony, to tender to Mr. Woodson, on his behalf and on behalf of his family and fris proceedings; for I had the honor of Colonel Robert A. Smith's acquaintance, and little did I think when last he was in Scotland, and we wandered amidst the western highlands of my native land and climbed the hills together, that I was never to see
Cave City (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
ptember 12, 1862, General Bragg ordered forward the same night Chalmers's brigade of Mississippians to the railroad at Cave City, and Duncan's Louisiana brigade to the junction next south, with instructions to intercept and cut Buell's communications by rail with Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot of supplies at Cave City, but, because information as to our movements had been, in some manner, communicated to the Federals, he did not succeed i orders from his superiors, as was currently believed, leaving parts of the Seventh and Twenty-ninth regiments to guard Cave City, advanced with the rest of his brigade, numbering 1,200 or 1,300 strong, to Horse Cave, on the road to Munfordsville, a our men in rear, I found that the dead were being hastily buried, and the living were preparing for a speedy return to Cave City. Two days later General Bragg moved up with the greater part of his army and surrounded these troops, then reinforce
Horse Cave (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
train. Hearing that a force of the enemy, supposed to be raw recruits, but in reality numbering, as we afterward found, largely in excess of 3,000 trained and disciplined soldiers, were entrenched at Munfordsville, protecting the railroad bridge over Greenriver, General Chalmers, without orders from his superiors, as was currently believed, leaving parts of the Seventh and Twenty-ninth regiments to guard Cave City, advanced with the rest of his brigade, numbering 1,200 or 1,300 strong, to Horse Cave, on the road to Munfordsville, and after resting until a late hour in the night again moved forward, and by dawn the next morning struck the Federal pickets about a mile in advance of their fortifications. These were hastily driven in by the sharpshooters of the brigade, commanded by Major W. C. Richards of Columbus, Miss., who fell seriously wounded before our main line made the attack. The brigade was then being rapidly placed in position for a general assault, in the following man
Woodsonville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
aratively small expense to the State; therefore, Be it resolved by the Legislature of the State of Mississippi, That the sum of $500, or as much thereof as may be necessary, be and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the State Treasury, not otherwise appropriated for the purposes recited in the foregoing preamble; the Auditor to issue his warrant there for on the requisition of the Governor, and that the Governor be requested to correspond with Anthony L. Woodson, of Woodsonville, Ky., and make such arrangements with him, or other suitable person, as may be deemed advisable, for the removal of the dead and erecting suitable white marble slabs, upon which shall be engraven the names of such as can be ascertained, one each to the dead of the several regiments so reinterred. Be it further resolved, That this resolution take effect from and after its passage. The labor of love which has cost the noble giver much anxious thought has at length been satisfactorily ac
Paraje (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
the Tenth had become engaged, promised success. The Twenty-ninth, Ninth, and Seventh regiments, after a gallant charge, reached the wide and deep ditch around Fort Craig, and the fortifications adjacent. These troops on reaching the ditch had been ordered to lie down. In that position they kept up their fire, and soon had the ece of woodland out of the enemy's range, and at the same time, for some reason satisfactory to himself, sent orders for the withdrawal of the troops assaulting Fort Craig. On receiving the order to withdraw, Walthall left at the ditch his senior Captain, Robert Robson, with his company, a brave old soldier, nearing his sixtieth r the lapse of several hours from the time the Tenth made its charge, and during a lull in the firing, soon following the withdrawal of the troops from and near Fort Craig, a white flag was seen emerging from behind the enemy's fortifications in the immediate front of the Tenth regiment. It proved to be a flag of truce, and was b
Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
rrently believed, leaving parts of the Seventh and Twenty-ninth regiments to guard Cave City, advanced with the rest of his brigade, numbering 1,200 or 1,300 strong, to Horse Cave, on the road to Munfordsville, and after resting until a late hour in the night again moved forward, and by dawn the next morning struck the Federal pickets about a mile in advance of their fortifications. These were hastily driven in by the sharpshooters of the brigade, commanded by Major W. C. Richards of Columbus, Miss., who fell seriously wounded before our main line made the attack. The brigade was then being rapidly placed in position for a general assault, in the following manner, as I remember: The Seventh Mississippi, under command of Colonel Bishop, on the extreme right and extending nearly to the river; next the Twenty-ninth, commanded by Colonel E. C. Walthall; next the Ninth, commanded by Colonel Thomas W. White—all three to be placed east of and parallel with the dirt road—and with a comp
Southwestern States (United States) (search for this): chapter 100
the occasion, of what transpired here twenty-two years ago, and the prominent figure to whom our thoughts now revert. Colonel Robert Alexander Smith was born on the 5th day of April, 1836, in Edinburg, Scotland. He was the youngest of five sons and five daughters of James and Annie Smith, of that city. The father, a Paisley manufacturer in early life, and later a wholesale druggist, still lives in his hale and hearty old age of ninety-three, at Spencer villa, 66 Brixton road, London, Southwest. At the age of fourteen Robert came to this country and settled in Jackson, Miss., where his eldest brother, our host, and a widowed sister had preceded him. Entering the business house of his brother, the youth soon won the elder's confidence, and by habits of sobriety, integrity and industry, together with the highest order of intelligent adaptability to the interests of the firm, he was at a comparatively early age placed in sole charge of the prosperous business. That brother writes
Spencer (Ind.) (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
retrospect, limited by the proprieties of the occasion, of what transpired here twenty-two years ago, and the prominent figure to whom our thoughts now revert. Colonel Robert Alexander Smith was born on the 5th day of April, 1836, in Edinburg, Scotland. He was the youngest of five sons and five daughters of James and Annie Smith, of that city. The father, a Paisley manufacturer in early life, and later a wholesale druggist, still lives in his hale and hearty old age of ninety-three, at Spencer villa, 66 Brixton road, London, Southwest. At the age of fourteen Robert came to this country and settled in Jackson, Miss., where his eldest brother, our host, and a widowed sister had preceded him. Entering the business house of his brother, the youth soon won the elder's confidence, and by habits of sobriety, integrity and industry, together with the highest order of intelligent adaptability to the interests of the firm, he was at a comparatively early age placed in sole charge of the p
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
iotism and public spirit which are exhibited here, not for the first time, by our noble-hearted benefactor, and with profound regard and reverence for the sentiment to be commemorated, I shall now, with the assistance of my young lady friend, a daughter of our noble host, and by birth a Mississippian, proceed to the unveiling of the monument, which I feel all will say crowns the giver of it with honor; does honor to the skilled sculptors of it, and reflects imperishable honor upon the State of Mississippi and her brave sons who fell here twenty-two years ago. Remarks by Mr. Watts. I have been deputed by my friend Mr. James Smith, under whose auspices I have come from old Scotland to take part in this most touching ceremony, to tender to Mr. Woodson, on his behalf and on behalf of his family and friends, their warmest thanks for the great interest and trouble he has taken in connection with the proceedings of to-day. I can readily believe from Mr. Woodson's well-known sympathy wi
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
road, London, Southwest. At the age of fourteen Robert came to this country and settled in Jackson, Miss., where his eldest brother, our host, and a widowed sister had preceded him. Entering the bus That brother writes from Glasgow: In 1855, young as he then was, I parted with my business in Jackson to him, while I removed thence to live here. I visited Jackson again in 1859, and did not see ve been remarked by the casual acquaintance, yet those who best knew the quiet young citizen of Jackson felt that behind the reserved and self-possessed exterior of Robert A. Smith dwelt the qualitieaptain of the Mississippi Rifles, a company organized in and composed of his fellow citizens of Jackson, whose services were tendered to the State as soon as she cast her fortunes with the Confederacy, where they were finally deposited with honor and reverence. In the beautiful Cemetery at Jackson, Miss., can be seen a circular plot of ground surrounded by a tasteful iron railing, inclosing a Sc
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