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Surrounded by overwhelming numbers, and realizing their utterly hopeless condition, Colonel Dunham, who had reached there with his regiment after the fight on the 14th, superseding Colonel Wilder in the command, yielded before day on the morning of the 17th to the demand of General Bragg for their surrender. The troops surrender of Wednesday, the 17th of September, just twenty-two years ago to day, the Tenth Mississippi regiment, in return for and in compliment of its gallant fight on the 14th, was marched in to receive the surrender of the troops and take possession of the forts. Our brave foes, who had been accorded very reasonable terms, were on the fell in that rash, ill-advised and sacrificial fight—heroes as noble as ever gave their lives for country or honor. On our retreat from here the evening of the 14th, Colonel Smith was carried to a house in the neighborhood and left in charge of his body-servant Henry, the Sergeant-Major, William French, and his brother-in-law,
The monument at Munfordsville. [We promised in our last to publish the addresses on the occasion of the unveiling of the monument at Munfordsville on the 17th of last September, and we are sure that our readers will be glad to have this worthy record of a graceful act, commemorating heroic deeds.] Mr. James Smith's remarks. Major Sykes,—In requesting you to aid my daughter, and who is also a daughter of Mississippi, in this ceremonial unveiling, permit me to say that my strong desire he 14th, Colonel Smith was carried to a house in the neighborhood and left in charge of his body-servant Henry, the Sergeant-Major, William French, and his brother-in-law, Captain Dodson, of his regiment, and lived until after the surrender on the 17th, his last thoughts reaching out for the welfare and concern of his men. His remains were temporarily interred near the scene of his death until the following March, when the loving care of a sister and nephew, who, by permission of the authorities
er gave their lives for country or honor. On our retreat from here the evening of the 14th, Colonel Smith was carried to a house in the neighborhood and left in charge of his body-servant Henry, the Sergeant-Major, William French, and his brother-in-law, Captain Dodson, of his regiment, and lived until after the surrender on the 17th, his last thoughts reaching out for the welfare and concern of his men. His remains were temporarily interred near the scene of his death until the following March, when the loving care of a sister and nephew, who, by permission of the authorities came through the lines and removed them to the admiring fellow citizens of his adopted city, where they were finally deposited with honor and reverence. In the beautiful Cemetery at Jackson, Miss., can be seen a circular plot of ground surrounded by a tasteful iron railing, inclosing a Scotch granite shaft with the following inscription: Erected to the memory of Colonel R. A. Smith, of the Tenth Mississippi
f of the Confederacy was his friend, and he permits no opportunity to pass to manifest his attachment to his person and to the cause which was forever eclipsed in his fall. During a long life, and even before fortune had so generously smiled upon and blessed his efforts, he has been noted for his deeds of charity. His private benefactions are only equaled by his public philanthropy. When I received, in November last, a letter from him informing me that during his visit to this country, the June previous, he had purchased a spot of the field of action here, and would erect a great stone as an imperishable mark of the place of sacrifice, and within the very massive inclosure to be built, any who are interested in the dead of that battlefield, from Mississippi, were invited to deposit their remains, all the better impulses of my nature went out across the broad Atlantic to the home of this good man, who, in honoring the memory of his dead brother, did not forget to honor Mississippi.
The monument at Munfordsville. [We promised in our last to publish the addresses on the occasion of the unveiling of the monument at Munfordsville on the 17th of last September, and we are sure that our readers will be glad to have this worthy record of a graceful act, commemorating heroic deeds.] Mr. James Smith's remarks. Major Sykes,—In requesting you to aid my daughter, and who is also a daughter of Mississippi, in this ceremonial unveiling, permit me to say that my strong desire has ever been to have the opportunity and the ability to place an imperishable mark on this field, the scene of as severe and heart-rending a struggle as ever occurred, and it gratifies me to see now this great stone firmly placed and durable as man can accomplish. It gratifies me, it gratifies those relatives and friends of Colonel Smith who are here from abroad to meet you and to meet so many of his compatriots from far distant parts of this land on this interesting occasion. It is not fo
September 17th (search for this): chapter 100
day on the morning of the 17th to the demand of General Bragg for their surrender. The troops surrendered consisted of the Seventeenth, Forty-third, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth Indiana Regiments, a company of Louisville cavalry, a part of the Fourth Ohio and a section of the Thirteenth Indiana battery, amounting in all to about 4500 men and ten guns, together with a large supply of Quartermaster and Commissary stores. At an early hour on the morning of Wednesday, the 17th of September, just twenty-two years ago to day, the Tenth Mississippi regiment, in return for and in compliment of its gallant fight on the 14th, was marched in to receive the surrender of the troops and take possession of the forts. Our brave foes, who had been accorded very reasonable terms, were on the same day marched back to the lines of General Buell and paroled. Thus ended the battle and surrender of Munfordsville, which we have to-day gathered to recall, and to embalm in memory and perpet
ed the grateful recognition of the State and Confederate authorities. The deposed Chief of the Confederacy was his friend, and he permits no opportunity to pass to manifest his attachment to his person and to the cause which was forever eclipsed in his fall. During a long life, and even before fortune had so generously smiled upon and blessed his efforts, he has been noted for his deeds of charity. His private benefactions are only equaled by his public philanthropy. When I received, in November last, a letter from him informing me that during his visit to this country, the June previous, he had purchased a spot of the field of action here, and would erect a great stone as an imperishable mark of the place of sacrifice, and within the very massive inclosure to be built, any who are interested in the dead of that battlefield, from Mississippi, were invited to deposit their remains, all the better impulses of my nature went out across the broad Atlantic to the home of this good man,
April 5th, 1836 AD (search for this): chapter 100
om Scotland has confided to me, to the fact that be knew me to have been not only an officer under his brother, but a constant friend of that brother, and present in the engagement here September 14, 1862, when that gallant soldier fell. It is at this time meet that we take a retrospect, limited by the proprieties of the occasion, of what transpired here twenty-two years ago, and the prominent figure to whom our thoughts now revert. Colonel Robert Alexander Smith was born on the 5th day of April, 1836, in Edinburg, Scotland. He was the youngest of five sons and five daughters of James and Annie Smith, of that city. The father, a Paisley manufacturer in early life, and later a wholesale druggist, still lives in his hale and hearty old age of ninety-three, at Spencer villa, 66 Brixton road, London, Southwest. At the age of fourteen Robert came to this country and settled in Jackson, Miss., where his eldest brother, our host, and a widowed sister had preceded him. Entering the bus
of fourteen Robert came to this country and settled in Jackson, Miss., where his eldest brother, our host, and a widowed sister had preceded him. Entering the business house of his brother, the youth soon won the elder's confidence, and by habits of sobriety, integrity and industry, together with the highest order of intelligent adaptability to the interests of the firm, he was at a comparatively early age placed in sole charge of the prosperous business. That brother writes from Glasgow: In 1855, young as he then was, I parted with my business in Jackson to him, while I removed thence to live here. I visited Jackson again in 1859, and did not see him more, but the record was always good, unselfish devotion to duty and unflinching attachment to his command and the care of it. The breaking out of the civil war—the war between the States—found him at the head of this business house—a law-abiding, industrious, firm and intelligent citizen of his adopted State, by principle a Southern<
ed him. Entering the business house of his brother, the youth soon won the elder's confidence, and by habits of sobriety, integrity and industry, together with the highest order of intelligent adaptability to the interests of the firm, he was at a comparatively early age placed in sole charge of the prosperous business. That brother writes from Glasgow: In 1855, young as he then was, I parted with my business in Jackson to him, while I removed thence to live here. I visited Jackson again in 1859, and did not see him more, but the record was always good, unselfish devotion to duty and unflinching attachment to his command and the care of it. The breaking out of the civil war—the war between the States—found him at the head of this business house—a law-abiding, industrious, firm and intelligent citizen of his adopted State, by principle a Southerner and by inheritance a Christian. Born in a land of heroes, his was a nature suited for the stirring events which were to follow. With <
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