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E. T. Sykes (search for this): chapter 100
occasion of the unveiling of the monument at Munfordsville on the 17th of last September, and we are sure that our readers will be glad to have this worthy record of a graceful act, commemorating heroic deeds.] Mr. James Smith's remarks. Major Sykes,—In requesting you to aid my daughter, and who is also a daughter of Mississippi, in this ceremonial unveiling, permit me to say that my strong desire has ever been to have the opportunity and the ability to place an imperishable mark on this ng fulfilment of duty that enriches the annals of our race. In the loss of these dear, devoted men the costly price was paid; their memory is ever green with us, and forever within this inclosure may their ashes repose in peace. Address of Major Sykes. Mr. Chairman, My Comrades and Fellow Citizens: Under ordinary circumstances I would not have come so long a distance to enter my presence here to-day, but, considering the importance and dignity of the occasion; the distance to be traveled
Robert Alexander Smith (search for this): chapter 100
he Tenth Mississippi Regiment, commanded by Colonel Robert A. Smith, and to deliver an address commemorative ofure to whom our thoughts now revert. Colonel Robert Alexander Smith was born on the 5th day of April, 1836,ind the reserved and self-possessed exterior of Robert A. Smith dwelt the qualities of the true soldier. Thus vacancy to be filled by a Mississippi soldier, Robert A. Smith would at once have been promoted to the grade on. The Tenth Mississippi, under command of Colonel Robert A. Smith, was to be placed in position to the left, llowing inscription: Erected to the memory of Colonel R. A. Smith, of the Tenth Mississippi regiment, Confederahe Tenth Mississippi regiment, commanded by Colonel Robert A. Smith, and has generously offered to any who are o-day's proceedings; for I had the honor of Colonel Robert A. Smith's acquaintance, and little did I think when Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant
of saying that my heart—aye, and the hearts of thousands of my countrymen—were with you in that hour of agony. We felt, instinctively, that you were fighting for your hearths and homes, and I know no greater heroes in the annals of the Old or New Worlds than Generals Lee or Jackson, and many other of your leaders. Why, to us Scotchmen, these men appeared, not only as brilliant commanders, but as the very incarnation of patriotism and self-sacrifice, recalling to us the magic names of our Wallace and of our Bruce. True, your leaders did not win success, but they did better, they deserved it; and even the graves of your dear departed proclaim the truth, that there is no nobler sentiment or abiding virtue than the love of country and of independence. They are gone, but their spirits still dwell among us. What might have been, under different auspices, and had success crowned your leaders' arms, I know not; but of this I am certain, that they have bequeathed to you a heritage of pa
W. C. Nesbitt (search for this): chapter 100
ythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. Supples; Company I, W. T. Holloway; Company K, Ira Cole, A. T. Johnson, F. L. Kelly, W. R. Turner, William M. Drury, J. J. Keith. Twenty-ninth Regiment.—Company B, A. J. Burnett, E. S. Sadley, A. W. Squires; Company G
D. R. Duncan (search for this): chapter 100
he intervening time between the battle of Shiloh and Bragg's Kentucky campaign, we come to speak of Colonel Smith in his last battle,—the one here,—known as the battle of Munfordsville, fought September 14, 1862. Immediately prior to entering Kentucky Colonel Smith had been ordered to resume command of his regiment. On reaching Glasgow with his main force September 12, 1862, General Bragg ordered forward the same night Chalmers's brigade of Mississippians to the railroad at Cave City, and Duncan's Louisiana brigade to the junction next south, with instructions to intercept and cut Buell's communications by rail with Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot of supplies at Cave City, but, because information as to our movements had been, in some manner, communicated to the Federals, he did not succeed in capturing any train. Hearing that a force of the enemy, supposed to be raw recruits, but in reality numbering, as we afterward found, lar
Robert Robson (search for this): chapter 100
distance, however, toward the artillery, when General Chalmers, who, in the meantime, had ridden in that direction, discovered that it was a friendly gun, and stopped the firing. He then gave orders for the Ninth to withdraw into a piece of woodland out of the enemy's range, and at the same time, for some reason satisfactory to himself, sent orders for the withdrawal of the troops assaulting Fort Craig. On receiving the order to withdraw, Walthall left at the ditch his senior Captain, Robert Robson, with his company, a brave old soldier, nearing his sixtieth winter, with orders to keep up a fire, until the regiment, which he thought would not be in the meantime missed, got to the woods, several hundred yards off, and then to scatter and reach him as best they could. The result was, that the only casualities, in making the successful retreat, were two men wounded. The gallantry of these troops, and the splendid handling of them, was reported to General Bragg, who, on the captur
March, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 100
elt the qualities of the true soldier. Thus it was that on the first mutterings of the coming storm he was elected Captain of the Mississippi Rifles, a company organized in and composed of his fellow citizens of Jackson, whose services were tendered to the State as soon as she cast her fortunes with the Confederacy, and whose first duty was to escort the newly elected President to the seat of government at Montgomery, Ala. At the first call of the Confederacy on Mississippi for troops in March, 1861, he was ordered with his company to Pensacola navy yard, where General Bragg was organizing his heroic little army, that was subsequently to become so justly famous in the annals of war. This call resulted in the assembling of twenty companies from Mississippi, at Pensacola, which were organized into two regiments and named the Ninth and Tenth. The Mississippi Rifles, as Company D, formed a part of this latter regiment commanded by Colonel Moses Phillips. Before the expiration of two mo
The monument at Munfordsville. [We promised in our last to publish the addresses on the occasion of the unveiling of the monument at Munfordsville on the 17th of last September, and we are sure that our readers will be glad to have this worthy record of a graceful act, commemorating heroic deeds.] Mr. James Smith's remarks. Major Sykes,—In requesting you to aid my daughter, and who is also a daughter of Mississippi, in this ceremonial unveiling, permit me to say that my strong desire he 14th, Colonel Smith was carried to a house in the neighborhood and left in charge of his body-servant Henry, the Sergeant-Major, William French, and his brother-in-law, Captain Dodson, of his regiment, and lived until after the surrender on the 17th, his last thoughts reaching out for the welfare and concern of his men. His remains were temporarily interred near the scene of his death until the following March, when the loving care of a sister and nephew, who, by permission of the authorities
April 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 100
at he shone to best advantage. His bearing which, when in repose, was essentially military and dignified, rather than graceful, assumed a heroic type when in the heat of battle. He looked and felt a different man. The roar of artillery and the rattle of musketry sounded as thrilling music to his ears, imparting to him new life. Then, with face aglow with the inspiration of his soul, he was ready for any deed of high emprise. Throughout the two days battle of Shiloh—on the 6th and 7th of April, 1862—Colonel Smith was conspicuous for his gallantry and the splendid handling of his troops. No regiment on that bloody field did better service or achieved greater triumphs, and this was due as much to the sterling qualities of its Commander, his coolness, intrepid bravery and influence over his men when in action, as to the excellence of his troops. His gallantry and unflinching courage, his high sense of honor, and his aptitude to grasp the arts of war, together with self-abnegation a
April 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 100
as in action that he shone to best advantage. His bearing which, when in repose, was essentially military and dignified, rather than graceful, assumed a heroic type when in the heat of battle. He looked and felt a different man. The roar of artillery and the rattle of musketry sounded as thrilling music to his ears, imparting to him new life. Then, with face aglow with the inspiration of his soul, he was ready for any deed of high emprise. Throughout the two days battle of Shiloh—on the 6th and 7th of April, 1862—Colonel Smith was conspicuous for his gallantry and the splendid handling of his troops. No regiment on that bloody field did better service or achieved greater triumphs, and this was due as much to the sterling qualities of its Commander, his coolness, intrepid bravery and influence over his men when in action, as to the excellence of his troops. His gallantry and unflinching courage, his high sense of honor, and his aptitude to grasp the arts of war, together with s
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