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time to the date of our removal in the spring of 1862 to Corinth, where Albert Sidney Johnston was assembling his army to give battle to the enemy under Grant and Buell, Colonel Smith was industrious in his study of the science and art of war and giving the needed instruction to his regiment. So proficient had he become in all thalmers's brigade of Mississippians to the railroad at Cave City, and Duncan's Louisiana brigade to the junction next south, with instructions to intercept and cut Buell's communications by rail with Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot of supplies at Cave City, but, because informatof the troops and take possession of the forts. Our brave foes, who had been accorded very reasonable terms, were on the same day marched back to the lines of General Buell and paroled. Thus ended the battle and surrender of Munfordsville, which we have to-day gathered to recall, and to embalm in memory and perpetuate in marble t
James Paine (search for this): chapter 100
uspices, and had success crowned your leaders' arms, I know not; but of this I am certain, that they have bequeathed to you a heritage of patriotism and renown which most nations may well covet, and which you cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mor
Anthony L. Woodson (search for this): chapter 100
the foregoing preamble; the Auditor to issue his warrant there for on the requisition of the Governor, and that the Governor be requested to correspond with Anthony L. Woodson, of Woodsonville, Ky., and make such arrangements with him, or other suitable person, as may be deemed advisable, for the removal of the dead and erecting s I have been deputed by my friend Mr. James Smith, under whose auspices I have come from old Scotland to take part in this most touching ceremony, to tender to Mr. Woodson, on his behalf and on behalf of his family and friends, their warmest thanks for the great interest and trouble he has taken in connection with the proceedings of to-day. I can readily believe from Mr. Woodson's well-known sympathy with the cause and with the occasion of our gathering, that he looks for no return; but we feel that we could not separate without recording in the strongest terms our appreciation of his noble and generous conduct. And while on my feet will you allow me to e
r spirits still dwell among us. What might have been, under different auspices, and had success crowned your leaders' arms, I know not; but of this I am certain, that they have bequeathed to you a heritage of patriotism and renown which most nations may well covet, and which you cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. N
James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 100
ne; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. Supples; Company I, W. T. Holloway; Company K, Ira Cole, A. T. Johnson, F. L. Kelly, W. R. Turner, William M. Drury, J. J. Keith. Twenty-ninth Regiment.—Company B, A. J. Burnett, E. S. Sadley, A. W. Squires; Company G, Corporal H. Russiale, John Williams, John Yeager; Company K, C. R. Dowsing, R.
E. C. Walthall (search for this): chapter 100
ber: The Seventh Mississippi, under command of Colonel Bishop, on the extreme right and extending nearly to the river; next the Twenty-ninth, commanded by Colonel E. C. Walthall; next the Ninth, commanded by Colonel Thomas W. White—all three to be placed east of and parallel with the dirt road—and with a company of sharpshooters ae, and soon had the Federals so they dared not raise their heads above the parapet. The United States flag flying above the fort was riddled by the bullets from Walthall's guns They had been in this position only a short time when a piece of artillery belonging to Scott's Louisiana cavalry, which had come upon the field without t the same time, for some reason satisfactory to himself, sent orders for the withdrawal of the troops assaulting Fort Craig. On receiving the order to withdraw, Walthall left at the ditch his senior Captain, Robert Robson, with his company, a brave old soldier, nearing his sixtieth winter, with orders to keep up a fire, until the
, and which you cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Se
Moses Phillips (search for this): chapter 100
esulted in the assembling of twenty companies from Mississippi, at Pensacola, which were organized into two regiments and named the Ninth and Tenth. The Mississippi Rifles, as Company D, formed a part of this latter regiment commanded by Colonel Moses Phillips. Before the expiration of two months service Colonel Phillips sickened and died, immediately after which Captain Smith was elected to the vacant colonelcy. From that time to the date of our removal in the spring of 1862 to Corinth, wherColonel Phillips sickened and died, immediately after which Captain Smith was elected to the vacant colonelcy. From that time to the date of our removal in the spring of 1862 to Corinth, where Albert Sidney Johnston was assembling his army to give battle to the enemy under Grant and Buell, Colonel Smith was industrious in his study of the science and art of war and giving the needed instruction to his regiment. So proficient had he become in all the accomplishments of a regimental commander that on reaching Corinth and being placed with the other Mississippi troops which formed the brigade of General James R. Chalmers, he was soon recognized as the best drill-officer and the best d
James Smith (search for this): chapter 100
ord of a graceful act, commemorating heroic deeds.] Mr. James Smith's remarks. Major Sykes,—In requesting you to aid myatifies me, it gratifies those relatives and friends of Colonel Smith who are here from abroad to meet you and to meet so man and friends abroad to know of the high esteem in which Colonel Smith was held by his companions in arms and by his State, anitation extended to me a few weeks ago by letter from Mr. James Smith, written from Glasgow, Scotland, to be present at thiseserves more than a passing notice. My comrades, in Mr. James Smith, our honored friend and host, whom it is my pleasure ew and enduring luster upon its name; and, whereas, Mr. James Smith, of Glasgow, Scotland, once an honored citizen of Misarks by Mr. Watts. I have been deputed by my friend Mr. James Smith, under whose auspices I have come from old Scotland tove shared in the joys and pleasures of my dear friend, Mr. James Smith, so now I am thankful to have the privilege of standin
uggles, but none more sanguinary than the field of Munfordsville, an exhibition of patriotic discipline and unfaltering obedience in the face of death never perhaps excelled, a sore and regretful sacrifice, but an example of unflinching fulfilment of duty that enriches the annals of our race. In the loss of these dear, devoted men the costly price was paid; their memory is ever green with us, and forever within this inclosure may their ashes repose in peace. Address of Major Sykes. Mr. Chairman, My Comrades and Fellow Citizens: Under ordinary circumstances I would not have come so long a distance to enter my presence here to-day, but, considering the importance and dignity of the occasion; the distance to be traveled from his home by the noble-hearted and generous gentleman who presides as our host; the honor to be conferred upon my State, and the events of twenty-two years ago to be recalled—events in which some of you as survivors and those who fell here acted so noble a part,
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