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Richard Scott (search for this): chapter 100
Federals so they dared not raise their heads above the parapet. The United States flag flying above the fort was riddled by the bullets from Walthall's guns They had been in this position only a short time when a piece of artillery belonging to Scott's Louisiana cavalry, which had come upon the field without the knowledge of General Chalmers, opened fire a short distance to the northeast, and unfortunately threw shell so near to our assaulting column as to cause some confusion in that part of J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Josep
fore our main line made the attack. The brigade was then being rapidly placed in position for a general assault, in the following manner, as I remember: The Seventh Mississippi, under command of Colonel Bishop, on the extreme right and extending nearly to the river; next the Twenty-ninth, commanded by Colonel E. C. Walthall; next the Ninth, commanded by Colonel Thomas W. White—all three to be placed east of and parallel with the dirt road—and with a company of sharpshooters and a part of Garrity's battery, constituted the right attacking column. The Tenth Mississippi, under command of Colonel Robert A. Smith, was to be placed in position to the left, perpendicular to, but far removed from the dirt road, and constituted the left attacking column, with the Forty-fourth, commanded by Lieutentant-Colonel James Moore, in reserve and partially covering the interval between the Tenth and the road. With these dispositions made, General Chalmers would be prepared to advance on the enemy's
Pickens B. Watts (search for this): chapter 100
le-hearted benefactor, and with profound regard and reverence for the sentiment to be commemorated, I shall now, with the assistance of my young lady friend, a daughter of our noble host, and by birth a Mississippian, proceed to the unveiling of the monument, which I feel all will say crowns the giver of it with honor; does honor to the skilled sculptors of it, and reflects imperishable honor upon the State of Mississippi and her brave sons who fell here twenty-two years ago. Remarks by Mr. Watts. I have been deputed by my friend Mr. James Smith, under whose auspices I have come from old Scotland to take part in this most touching ceremony, to tender to Mr. Woodson, on his behalf and on behalf of his family and friends, their warmest thanks for the great interest and trouble he has taken in connection with the proceedings of to-day. I can readily believe from Mr. Woodson's well-known sympathy with the cause and with the occasion of our gathering, that he looks for no return; bu
W. H. Bishop (search for this): chapter 100
our in the night again moved forward, and by dawn the next morning struck the Federal pickets about a mile in advance of their fortifications. These were hastily driven in by the sharpshooters of the brigade, commanded by Major W. C. Richards of Columbus, Miss., who fell seriously wounded before our main line made the attack. The brigade was then being rapidly placed in position for a general assault, in the following manner, as I remember: The Seventh Mississippi, under command of Colonel Bishop, on the extreme right and extending nearly to the river; next the Twenty-ninth, commanded by Colonel E. C. Walthall; next the Ninth, commanded by Colonel Thomas W. White—all three to be placed east of and parallel with the dirt road—and with a company of sharpshooters and a part of Garrity's battery, constituted the right attacking column. The Tenth Mississippi, under command of Colonel Robert A. Smith, was to be placed in position to the left, perpendicular to, but far removed from the
Robert A. Smith (search for this): chapter 100
battle to the enemy under Grant and Buell, Colonel Smith was industrious in his study of the sciencf Shiloh—on the 6th and 7th of April, 1862—Colonel Smith was conspicuous for his gallantry and the assignment. General Bragg's estimate of Colonel Smith may be judged by the following extract frog's Kentucky campaign, we come to speak of Colonel Smith in his last battle,—the one here,—known as2. Immediately prior to entering Kentucky Colonel Smith had been ordered to resume command of his g the danger and hazard of the enterprise, Colonel Smith replied in substance: To charge now, beford, the General says, charge now, to which Colonel Smith made response, The duty is mine, the respoand to a fence standing to our side of it, Colonel Smith instructed his company commanders that as,center or right. It so happened that when Colonel Smith reached the felled timber he struck a narrretreat from here the evening of the 14th, Colonel Smith was carried to a house in the neighborhood[2 more.
August Levesa (search for this): chapter 100
I am certain, that they have bequeathed to you a heritage of patriotism and renown which most nations may well covet, and which you cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. P
W. R. Ratcliff (search for this): chapter 100
ou cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. S
the battle and surrender of Munfordsville, which we have to-day gathered to recall, and to embalm in memory and perpetuate in marble the deeds of our heroes who fell in that rash, ill-advised and sacrificial fight—heroes as noble as ever gave their lives for country or honor. On our retreat from here the evening of the 14th, Colonel Smith was carried to a house in the neighborhood and left in charge of his body-servant Henry, the Sergeant-Major, William French, and his brother-in-law, Captain Dodson, of his regiment, and lived until after the surrender on the 17th, his last thoughts reaching out for the welfare and concern of his men. His remains were temporarily interred near the scene of his death until the following March, when the loving care of a sister and nephew, who, by permission of the authorities came through the lines and removed them to the admiring fellow citizens of his adopted city, where they were finally deposited with honor and reverence. In the beautiful Cemeter
Martin Cantrell (search for this): chapter 100
ur leaders' arms, I know not; but of this I am certain, that they have bequeathed to you a heritage of patriotism and renown which most nations may well covet, and which you cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieu
Joseph Pruden (search for this): chapter 100
e; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. Supples; Company I, W. T. Holloway; Company K, Ira Cole, A. T. Johnson, F. L. Kelly, W. R. Turner, William M. Drury, J. J. Keith. Twenty-ninth Regiment.—Company B, A. J. Burnett, E. S. Sadley, A. W. Squires; Company G, Corporal H. Russiale, John Williams, John Yeager; Company K, C. R. Dowsing, R.
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