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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
on for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of oy or the right of government can be predicated, is in the said mind, which dwells in the body called the State. Take, for example, Massachusetts, New York, or Pennsylvania. Everybody will admit that each of these entities had, at the making of the Constitution, its own name, geography, people, organism and political will, and th, and others, when they shaped the amendments the conquering States dictated, prohibit secession? Because they knew their sovereigns, New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois preferred the old union of free societies of people to a nation of counties; and they could not even have hinted at preventing secession, an
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 101
lain why the phrase, We, the people of the United States, instead of We, the people of the States, style of the government shall be The United States of America, &c. But the whole instrument, after the generalization: We, the people of the United States, was substituted as an equivalent to a spe national, and retain the proper title The United States; that this was agreed to nem. con.; that States in this Union—calls the system the United States, and characterizes all the people as citizle called by those names—the people of the United States. The people, as States, have the only votizes as preestablished. The people of the United States are, in fact, and constitutionally member The States are the real Government of the United States. No one who searches for truth, and thites the people—all being the people of the United States and citizens of different States, as the Cthe government of [i. e. belonging to] the United States;—the so-called Government being only their[6 more.
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
mble, unanimously adopted by the Federal Convention for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish t entirety of life and legal force—three of them ratifying, and pro tanto establishing, the said Constitution in 1787, eight in 1788, one in 1789, and the last, Rhode Island, in 1790; and moreover clearly demonstrated that the said States themselves intended to be and remain the government—intended, in short, to remain republics orthe real government was the republics, or self-governors, named in the Constitution. Curtis, the most conspicuous living advocate of the pseudo nation, said Rhode Island had after independence, and of course up to her adoption of the Constitution, absolute sovereignty. [Ii Hist. Const'n, 599.] Again:—The meeting of the Sta<
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
Constitution, described as follows: Each State retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence. Hence, We, the people of the United States meant, we, the people of the States that are united. Now we are prepared for the historical fact well known to but not mentioned by Dane, Story and Webster, viz: that the preamble, unanimously adopted by the Federal Convention for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of ourselves and our posterity: Article I. The style of the government shall be The United States of America, &c. But the whole instrument, after being agreed upon and adopted, article by article, was placed in the hands of a committee of revision, who reported it back considerably changed and improv
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
e people of the United States meant, we, the people of the States that are united. Now we are prepared for the historical fact well known to but not mentioned by Dane, Story and Webster, viz: that the preamble, unanimously adopted by the Federal Convention for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of ourselves and our posterity: Article I. The style of the government shall be The United States of America, &c. But the whole instrument, after being agreed upon and adopted, article by article, was placed in the hands of a committee of revision, who reported it back considerably changed and improved in mere form. As to the preamble, the generalization: We, the people of the United States, was substituted a
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
d as follows: Each State retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence. Hence, We, the people of the United States meant, we, the people of the States that are united. Now we are prepared for the historical fact well known to but not mentioned by Dane, Story and Webster, viz: that the preamble, unanimously adopted by the Federal Convention for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of ourselves and our posterity: Article I. The style of the government shall be The United States of America, &c. But the whole instrument, after being agreed upon and adopted, article by article, was placed in the hands of a committee of revision, who reported it back considerably changed and improved in mere form. As to
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
by the Federal Convention for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of ourselves and our posterity: Article I. The style of the government shall be The United States of America, &c. But the whole instrument, after beant tied and helpless victims. Iv. two Constructions of the Constitution, Is a common phrase, involving error; opposite interpretations of a written instrument—as Judge Fenner euphemistically puts it. Soon after peace, James L. Orr, of South Carolina, hastened to bridge the bloody chasm by telling the North we differed with her as to the construction of the Constitution; and she proved ours false by whipping us. By parity of reasoning, if you whip a man who denies your statement that your
North America (search for this): chapter 101
ople, as States, are to make all amendments. [Article V.] Each State has suffrage in the Senate, which can never end without her consent. All these provisions of the constitution, especially the last, make obvious both mind in the State and sovereignty in mind. Denying this seat and residence of sovereign will is simple untruth-criminal, if coupled with knowledge. Webster and Curtis fully Concede the Point —The former saying, in 1833, that sovereignty of government is unknown in North America. All power is with the people. Until the Constitution was ratified by nine States, it was but a proposal, the mere draft of an instrument, * * * inoperative paper, * * it had no authority; it spoke no language. In 1849 he said the parties to the Constitution originally were the thirteen confederated States; that it was founded on compact and plighted faith; and that the individual States had the exclusive possession of sovereignty. In 1850 he said the Constitution was the bond, and t
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence. Hence, We, the people of the United States meant, we, the people of the States that are united. Now we are prepared for the historical fact well known to but not mentioned by Dane, Story and Webster, viz: that the preamble, unanimously adopted by the Federal Convention for the proposed Constitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of ourselves and our posterity: Article I. The style of the government shall be The United States of America, &c. But the whole instrument, after being agreed upon and adopted, article by article, was placed in the hands of a committee of revision, who reported it back considerably changed and improved in mere form. As to the preamble, the genera
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennswells in the body called the State. Take, for example, Massachusetts, New York, or Pennsylvania. Everybody will admit that ution. These societies of people, named as New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, &c., in the first article of the Constitutiocession? Because they knew their sovereigns, New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois preferred the old unioe have political mind and act in government. New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, and the rest of the names in the Constitutio one government, and cease to be Maryland and Virginia, Massachusetts and Carolina. He saw that the people were the States aagents, and not above them. The societies, New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, et als., being complete and independent, andpose that the named societies of people—viz., New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, et als—started in the work of constituting s
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