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Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
erbert, who was ordered to Louisiana. The new Commanding General had acquired fame for the skill with which, in the peninsula of Virginia, he checked for weeks McClellan's invading army before miles of empty entrenchments, armed, in part, with Quaker guns, and by continually moving about his small force to multiply it in the Federal eyes. Feeling that something must be done to rouse the spirits of the people of Texas, he resolved to try his hand against the enemy's squadron lying in Galvestoe westward; then, after a few minutes, darkness and silince prevailed again. Many were the surmises upon this incident and several weeks intervened before the sinking of the Federal ship Hatteras by Captain Semmes, off Saint Louis Pass, became known on the island. For nine months all was quiet in Texas. The defenses of Galveston soon assumed shape, and Quaker guns frowning from the crests and casemates of the fort, held the Federals in check until real artillery could be placed in battery.
Sabine Lake (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
g too, and under it, two of them fled out of sight in the gulf; a third ship, stranding in her flight, was blown up by her commander, who lost his life in the act. Finally, the Federal infantry quartered on the wharf surrendered. This brilliant, but bloody engagement was over in less than two hours. Revilers were not wanting who called this victory a scratch; but they were soon silenced by the success of a scheme of the same kind, planned by the General, to drive off the Federals from Sabine Lake. On both occasions the General relied upon the confusion created among the enemy's ships by the unexpected appearance in their waters of strange looking crafts boldly steaming down to them. General Magruder's success far exceeded public expectation, and for a time he was the idol of the people of Texas. But States as well as Republics are ungrateful. Brave, generous, warm-hearted Magruder died at Houston in want and almost friendless. Much was said and written, but nothing done tow
Leon County (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
x companies of cavalry, to be enlisted for the war, to report at Galveston, and to be employed in patrolling the coast. Prompt response was made to the Governor's call; the following companies reported for duty, and were mustered into the Confederate States' service: Captain Riordan's Company A, from Harris county. Captain Myer's Company B, from Caldwell county. Captain McGreal's Company C, from Harris and Galveston counties. Captain McMahan's Company D, from Galveston and Leon counties. Captain Owen's Company E, Montgomery and Washington counties. Captain Menard's Company F, from Galveston and Liberty counties. Captain Atchison's company, from Fort Bend county, composed of one-year men, was also accepted in the service and became Company G. These seven companies were organized into a battalion under the command of Major Samuel Boyer Davis, who, being at the same time Assistant Adjutant-General at District headquarters, soon resigned his lineal rank. On t
Harris county (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
Galveston, and to be employed in patrolling the coast. Prompt response was made to the Governor's call; the following companies reported for duty, and were mustered into the Confederate States' service: Captain Riordan's Company A, from Harris county. Captain Myer's Company B, from Caldwell county. Captain McGreal's Company C, from Harris and Galveston counties. Captain McMahan's Company D, from Galveston and Leon counties. Captain Owen's Company E, Montgomery and Washington cowing companies reported for duty, and were mustered in for the war: Captain Du Pree's Company H, from Montgomery and Grimes counties. Captain Whitehead's Company I, from Montgomery and Grimes counties. Captain Hare's Company K, from Harris county. General Hebert, commanding the District of Texas, upon receiving the report of the completion of the regiment, appointed Major Samuel Boyer Davis to be its Colonel. But when it became known that newly organized regiments were, by law, en
Liberty county, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
esponse was made to the Governor's call; the following companies reported for duty, and were mustered into the Confederate States' service: Captain Riordan's Company A, from Harris county. Captain Myer's Company B, from Caldwell county. Captain McGreal's Company C, from Harris and Galveston counties. Captain McMahan's Company D, from Galveston and Leon counties. Captain Owen's Company E, Montgomery and Washington counties. Captain Menard's Company F, from Galveston and Liberty counties. Captain Atchison's company, from Fort Bend county, composed of one-year men, was also accepted in the service and became Company G. These seven companies were organized into a battalion under the command of Major Samuel Boyer Davis, who, being at the same time Assistant Adjutant-General at District headquarters, soon resigned his lineal rank. On the 7th of December, 1861, Major X. B. Debray, of the Second regiment of Texas infantry, was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding,
Galveston Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
to be dismantled and their artillery to be removed to the mainland at Virginia Point, where sand works had been raised. Indeed, this was an era of despondency and gloom for the people of Texas. In October, 1862, the Federal fleet entered Galveston Bay without resistance. The small force which had been left in the city retired to Virginia Point, the city itself being almost deserted by its inhabitants, who had moved with their chattels to Houston and the interior of the State. Communicataker guns, and by continually moving about his small force to multiply it in the Federal eyes. Feeling that something must be done to rouse the spirits of the people of Texas, he resolved to try his hand against the enemy's squadron lying in Galveston Bay. Under his instructions two steamboats, lying in Buffalo Bayou, at Houston, were travestied into rams and gunboats, armed with one gun each, and supplied with two tiers of cotton bales to give them, as the General said in confidence to his f
San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
Brown's battalion of cavalry, to re-enforce General Sibley in Arizona and New Mexico. This duty, by no means pleasant, as it entailed a march of about one thousand miles, over a country mostly deserted, sterile, and with long waterless stretches, was entered upon, if not cheerfully, at least with becoming soldierly fortitude. The regiment was on the march when the report was received that General Sibley, confronted by a largely superior force, and short of supplies, was falling back on San Antonio. Hence a new counter-order, and the regiment went to camp on the Bernard river. During these marches and counter-marches, and mainly in camp, the fine appearance of the regiment attracted the interest and curiosity of the people around. Drills on horseback and on foot, and dress-parade, enlivened by a very creditable band, were attended by ladies and gentlemen in carriages and in cavalcades; negroes, too, would flock around, and enjoyed the sight as they would have done a circus. Henc
Virginia Point (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
erected at Galveston, to be dismantled and their artillery to be removed to the mainland at Virginia Point, where sand works had been raised. Indeed, this was an era of despondency and gloom for thealveston Bay without resistance. The small force which had been left in the city retired to Virginia Point, the city itself being almost deserted by its inhabitants, who had moved with their chattelsfle-pits, occupied by a detachment of infantry and artillery. Debray's regiment, ordered to Virginia Point, by frequent patrols, day and night, satisfied the Federals that we still claimed the city, Adjutant R. M. Franklin, of Debrays regiment, having volunteered to serve as his aid. At Virginia Point General Magruder was actively organizing his land forces. We had about fifteen pieces of fid. Major A. M. Lea, of the engineer corps, having reported for duty to General Magruder, at Virginia Point, on the eve of the attack, was instructed to accompany the General to Galveston. After the
Buffalo Bayou (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
eral had acquired fame for the skill with which, in the peninsula of Virginia, he checked for weeks McClellan's invading army before miles of empty entrenchments, armed, in part, with Quaker guns, and by continually moving about his small force to multiply it in the Federal eyes. Feeling that something must be done to rouse the spirits of the people of Texas, he resolved to try his hand against the enemy's squadron lying in Galveston Bay. Under his instructions two steamboats, lying in Buffalo Bayou, at Houston, were travestied into rams and gunboats, armed with one gun each, and supplied with two tiers of cotton bales to give them, as the General said in confidence to his friends, an appearance of protection. A third boat was fitted out to act as tender. The two gun-boats were manned by volunteers of Green's brigade, converted for the occasion into horse marines, also by a company of artillery, the whole under the command of the brave Tom Green. Captain Leon Smith was the naval
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
n as were found to be unfitted for active service in the field were discharged, and, finally, volunteers from the several companies, having a surplus of men, joined together to form a new company, G, and elected R. L. Fulton, formerly of Company B, to be their Captain. Thus Debray's regiment was definitely constituted with its full complement of young, robust, enthusiastic, well-mounted, welldisciplined, and drilled volunteers, when the order was received to prepare to march to the State of Mississippi and report to General Van Dorn. The prospect of entering into service in the field, gladly hailed, was soon darkened by disappointment. The report of the fall of New Orleans caused the destination of the regiment to be changed, and it was ordered to proceed, with Brown's battalion of cavalry, to re-enforce General Sibley in Arizona and New Mexico. This duty, by no means pleasant, as it entailed a march of about one thousand miles, over a country mostly deserted, sterile, and with l
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