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Clifton, Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
and found Lieutenant Dowling and Lieutenant N. H. Smith, of the engineer corps, with forty-two men, defending the fort. Until 3 P. M. our men did not open on the enemy, as the range was too distant. The officers of the fort coolly held their fire until the enemy had approached near enough to reach them. But, when the enemy arrived within good range, our batteries were opened, and gallantly replied to a galling and most terrific fire from the enemy. As I entered the fort the gunboats Clifton, Arizona, Sachem, and Granite State, with several others, came boldly up to within one thousand yards, and opened their batteries, which were gallantly and effectively replied to by the Davis Guards. For one hour and thirty minutes a most terrific bombardment of grape, canister and shell was directed against our heroic and devoted little band within the fort. The shot struck in every direction, but, thanks be to God! not one of the noble Davis Guards was hurt. Too much credit cannot be award
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
to be, your obedient servant, Leon Smith, Commanding Marine Department of Texas. (special Order.) headquarters District of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, Houston, Texas, September 9, 1863. Another glorious victory has been won by the heroism of Texans. The enemy, confident of overpowering the little garrison at Sabine Pasd, and be prepared to make a sturdy resistance to the foe. Major-General J. B. Magruder. Edmund P. Turner, Assistant Adjutant-General. The Daily Post, of Houston, Texas, of August 22, 1880, has the following: A few days after the battle each man that participated in the fight was presented with a silver medal inscribed as ing have gone to that bourne whence no traveler returns, and but few members of the heroic band are in the land of the living, and those few reside in the city of Houston, and often meet together and talk about the battle in which they participated on the memorable 8th of September, 1863. The following are the names of the comp
Staten Island (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
r the circumstance, before finding out this important fact in the engagement. The three gun-boats engaged were the Sachem, a canal-boat in appearance, and about as effective, selected, because of her light draft, to precede the fleet. Her value was demonstrated by the fact that the first shot fired at her exploded her boiler and totally disabled her, scalding almost every man on board, and causing her to surrender without—if my memory serves me—firing a gun. The second gun-boat was a Staten Island ferry-boat, called the Clifton, which grounded before reaching the earth-work, and at the third or fourth shot from the Confederates had her steam-chest struck, which not only disabled her, but was the cause of the scalding of many of her crew. The third gun-boat was the Granite State, which drew too much water to get within effective distance, and she was not engaged. Distributed between the Sachem and Clifton were seventy-five infantry, who were blinded and scalded by the escaping st
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
Sabine Pass. A Federal account—letter from Adjutant-General Frederic speed. [We cheerfully give place to the following letter, which is a different version from the account of Sabine Pass which has been received among Confederates, and is very different from the one which follows it. We publish without comments:] Vicksburg, Miss., September 27th, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—In the October issue of the Southern Historical Society papers you ask, Who will send us a detailed sketch of the heroic defence of Sabine Pass? and referring to the death of Jack White, quote from an unknown exchange the statement that White was one of the forty Irishmen who held Sabine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of Mr. Davis, &c. The statement further goes on to say that the Federal force consisted of three Federal brigades and a fleet of gun-boats, and adds, the d
Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
d upon them from every direction. The result of the battle, which lasted from 3:30 to 5 P. M., was the capturing of the Clifton and Sachem, eighteen heavy guns, and one hundred and fifty prisoners, and the killing and wounding of fifty men, and driving outside the bar the enemy's fleet, comprising twenty-three vessels in all. I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, Leon Smith, Commanding Marine Department of Texas. (special Order.) headquarters District of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, Houston, Texas, September 9, 1863. Another glorious victory has been won by the heroism of Texans. The enemy, confident of overpowering the little garrison at Sabine Pass, boldly advanced to the work of capture. After a sharp contest he was entirely defeated, one gunboat hurrying off in a crippled condition, while two others, the Clifton and Sachem, with their armaments and crews, including the commander of the fleet, surrendered to the gallant defenders of the fort. The loss of the
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
Sabine Pass. A Federal account—letter from Adjutant-General Frederic speed. [We cheerfully give place to the following letter, which is a different version from the account of Sabine Pass which has been received among Confederates, and is very different from the one which follows it. We publish without comments:] Vicksburg, Miss., September 27th, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—In the October issue of the Southern Historical Society papers you ask, Who will send us a detailed sketch of the heroic defence of Sabine Pass? and referring to the death of Jack White, quote from an unknown exchange the statement that White was one of the forty Irishmen who held Sabine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of Mr. Davis, &c. The statement further goes on to say that the Federal force consisted of three Federal brigades and a fleet of gun-boats, and adds, the de
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 36
at which would have occasioned no very great difficulty if there had been found any spot where the army could have effected a landing, or the navy could have got one respectably constructed and equipped vessel within range. Such was not, however, the case, and it is as unfair to the whole Confederate forces to speak of the garrison of the earthwork at Sabine Pass as the forty bravest men of the Confederacy as it is to insinuate that the Union naval and military forces, lying out in the Gulf of Mexico, have any reason to be ashamed of the failure to capture a place they could not reach in vessels drawing fourteen to twenty-five feet of water, which was the case with the exception of those I have named, and which experience demonstrated drew too much to navigate a channel in which there could not have been much more, if any, than seven feet. Mr. Davis was undoubtedly misled, and did not know that if the garrison had abandoned their post at any time during the Federal reconnoisance—f
Cowleech Fork Sabine River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
that there may go into our record a full and authentic narrative of this heroic action, we copy the account given by President Davis in Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government.] The strategic importance to the enemy of the possession of Sabine river caused the organization of a large expedition of land and naval forces to enter and ascend the river. If successful, it gave the enemy short lines for operation against the interior of Texas, and relieved them of the discomfiture resulting frd to be ten thousand men. No adequate provision had been made to resist such a force, and, under the circumstances, none might have been promptly made on which reliance could have been reasonably placed. A few miles above the entrace into the Sabine river a small earthwork had been constructed, garrisoned at the time of the action by forty-two men and two lieutenants, with an armament of six guns. The officers and men were all Irishmen, and the company was called the Davis Guards. The Captai
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
lmost every man on board, and causing her to surrender without—if my memory serves me—firing a gun. The second gun-boat was a Staten Island ferry-boat, called the Clifton, which grounded before reaching the earth-work, and at the third or fourth shot from the Confederates had her steam-chest struck, which not only disabled her, butThe third gun-boat was the Granite State, which drew too much water to get within effective distance, and she was not engaged. Distributed between the Sachem and Clifton were seventy-five infantry, who were blinded and scalded by the escaping steam, and did not fire a shot. The balance of the Federal forces, owing to the heavy d about two thousand men on board, who, if a landing could have been effected, would have made short work of the forty bravest men of the Confederacy. But as the Clifton, drawing less water, ran aground before reaching the earth-work, and was rendered a helpless wreck by about three shots from the Confederate guns, the chances wer
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 36
hin less than two miles of the fort; the nearest point at which any other vessel, than those named, succeeded in getting during the entire engagement was the Mississippi-river steamer Laurel Hill, which drew eight feet of water, and the R. W. Thomas, another Mississippi-river steamer, drawing a little more water. These vessels hadMississippi-river steamer, drawing a little more water. These vessels had about two thousand men on board, who, if a landing could have been effected, would have made short work of the forty bravest men of the Confederacy. But as the Clifton, drawing less water, ran aground before reaching the earth-work, and was rendered a helpless wreck by about three shots from the Confederate guns, the chances were that the Mississippi-river boats, with their exposed boilers and machinery, would suffer a similar fate, and at no time were they within such a distance of the earth-work that they could be fairly said to be a menace to the heroic garrison. On the other hand, a force of Confederate infantry, estimated by the number and crowded co
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