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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
me by the commanding General, while occupying the intermediate line of entrenchments around Drewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direction of James river, while his left rested upon an elevated position across the railroad, with his masses immediately in front of our right and resting upon the railroad. The commanding General, seeing the right was the weak point of the enemy, determined uponve pieces of artillery by Hagood's brigade and a number of prisoners, besides killing and wounding many, and also in occupying the works. One regiment on the left of Hagood's brigade extended across the outer line of works in the direction of James river, which was ordered forward to connect with the right of General Ransom's division, but to my amazement found the enemy in strong force behind entrenchments. It was not intended that this regiment should attack the enemy in this position, as t
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 54
Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. report of General R. F. Hoke. headquarters Hoke's division, May 25th, 1864. Captain,—On Sunday, the 15th instant, the intention to attack the enemy on the morning of the 16th at early light was made known to me by the commanding General, while occupying the intermediate line of entrenchments around Drewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direcDrewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direction of James river, while his left rested upon an elevated position across the railroad, with his masses immediately in front of our right and resting upon the railroad. The commanding General, seeing the right was the weak point of the enemy, determined upon this as the point of attack. The brigades of Colquitt and Ransom were ordered relieved by an extension of my line to the right, which placed my division in line of battle, commencing at Fort Stephens, with Hagood's brigade on the left,
G. W. Hicks (search for this): chapter 54
to Captain Owens, of the Washington Artillery, whose fire materially assisted in its capture. Officers and men mentioned for gallant conduct by regimental commanders: In Twenty-Seventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant Gelling, Company C, Acting-Adjutant; Color-Bearer Tupper; Private H. P. Foster, Company D, of Color Guard; First Sergeant Pickens B. Watts, Company E. In Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers: Sergeant J. H. Onby, Company H, Color-Bearer, killed. In Eleventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant H. W. G. Bowman, Color-Bearer Hickman, Company B; Privates J. Jones, G. W. Hicks, Company K; Private A. P. Bulger, Company D; Private A. Mixson, Company F. In Twenty-Fifth South Carolina Volunteers: Private W. A. Dotteur, Company A; Private Wise, Company F; Sergeant B. P. Izlan, Company G; Private J. T. Shewmake, Company G; Sergeant H. J. Greer, Company B. I am, Captain, respectfully, Johnson Hagood, Brigadier-General Commanding.
H. W. G. Bowman (search for this): chapter 54
to Captain Owens, of the Washington Artillery, whose fire materially assisted in its capture. Officers and men mentioned for gallant conduct by regimental commanders: In Twenty-Seventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant Gelling, Company C, Acting-Adjutant; Color-Bearer Tupper; Private H. P. Foster, Company D, of Color Guard; First Sergeant Pickens B. Watts, Company E. In Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers: Sergeant J. H. Onby, Company H, Color-Bearer, killed. In Eleventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant H. W. G. Bowman, Color-Bearer Hickman, Company B; Privates J. Jones, G. W. Hicks, Company K; Private A. P. Bulger, Company D; Private A. Mixson, Company F. In Twenty-Fifth South Carolina Volunteers: Private W. A. Dotteur, Company A; Private Wise, Company F; Sergeant B. P. Izlan, Company G; Private J. T. Shewmake, Company G; Sergeant H. J. Greer, Company B. I am, Captain, respectfully, Johnson Hagood, Brigadier-General Commanding.
of my line to the right, which placed my division in line of battle, commencing at Fort Stephens, with Hagood's brigade on the left, Johnson's on his right, then Clingman, with Corse upon his right. These two brigades, under the command of General Colquitt, were held in reserve immediately in rear of Hagood's brigade. The divisise repeated attacks upon the right of General Johnson. I became alarmed for him, as he had several times sent to me for assistance, and ordered two regiments of Clingman's brigade to report to him, which I did with great reluctance, as I felt it would defeat my plans on my right; but necessity compelled me. In order, also, to relieve the position of General Johnson, which was our key, I ordered forward Corse with his brigade and Clingman with his two regiments. They went forward in good style and drove the enemy from their front, but owing to the superior numbers and strong entrenchments they were not able to drive them entirely from their positions.
W. T. H. Brooks (search for this): chapter 54
apprehended attack which did not occur, and Colonel Gaillard's regiment (Twenty-Seventh) was detached to assist General Ransom's further advance down the general line of battle. The brigade generally behaved with a steadiness and gallantry that was extremely gratifying. Colonel Gantt, Colonel Gaillard, Lieutenant- Colonel Nelson, Major Glover, and Captain Wilds, commanding regiments, discharged their duty with marked ability. Major Rion, of the Seventh South Carolina Battalion, and Captain Brooks, of the same, behaved with conspicuous gallantry, continuing with their commands, the former throughout the day and the latter until I ordered him to the rear after he had received three severe wounds. The severity of the fire of the enemy is illustrated by the fact that fifty-seven bullet marks were found upon the flag of the Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers after the fight, and in one of its companies there were sixty-five casualties, of which nineteen were killed outright.
I. K. Williams (search for this): chapter 54
ed outright. The general list of casualties appended will show that the losses of this battalion were scarcely exceptional. My staff, Captain Molony and Lieutenants Mazyck and Martin, behaved with great gallantry and marked efficiency. They were all dismounted by the enemy's fire during the fight. Captain Molony having a second horse, which he obtained during the day, killed. I also desire to mention for meritorious conduct coming under my immediate observation the name of Private I. K. Williams, of the Twenty-Seventh. The casualties of the brigade were 433. Its field return of the preceding day was 2,235. I append a list of names mentioned for gallantry by regimental commanders, many of which came also under my observation. A number of prisoners were captured by the brigade, but as they were hurried immediately to the rear, I can only estimate the number loosely at 300, including several officers. The battery captured, consisted of three Napoleons and two twent
de were 433. Its field return of the preceding day was 2,235. I append a list of names mentioned for gallantry by regimental commanders, many of which came also under my observation. A number of prisoners were captured by the brigade, but as they were hurried immediately to the rear, I can only estimate the number loosely at 300, including several officers. The battery captured, consisted of three Napoleons and two twenty-pounder Parrotts, fully equipped, and was turned over to Colonel Waddy with a request that it be assigned to Captain Owens, of the Washington Artillery, whose fire materially assisted in its capture. Officers and men mentioned for gallant conduct by regimental commanders: In Twenty-Seventh Regiment South Carolina Volunteers: Lieutenant Gelling, Company C, Acting-Adjutant; Color-Bearer Tupper; Private H. P. Foster, Company D, of Color Guard; First Sergeant Pickens B. Watts, Company E. In Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers: Sergeant J. H. O
R. M. Martin (search for this): chapter 54
he had received three severe wounds. The severity of the fire of the enemy is illustrated by the fact that fifty-seven bullet marks were found upon the flag of the Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers after the fight, and in one of its companies there were sixty-five casualties, of which nineteen were killed outright. The general list of casualties appended will show that the losses of this battalion were scarcely exceptional. My staff, Captain Molony and Lieutenants Mazyck and Martin, behaved with great gallantry and marked efficiency. They were all dismounted by the enemy's fire during the fight. Captain Molony having a second horse, which he obtained during the day, killed. I also desire to mention for meritorious conduct coming under my immediate observation the name of Private I. K. Williams, of the Twenty-Seventh. The casualties of the brigade were 433. Its field return of the preceding day was 2,235. I append a list of names mentioned for gallantry by r
position to protect the right flank of the division from an apprehended attack which did not occur, and Colonel Gaillard's regiment (Twenty-Seventh) was detached to assist General Ransom's further advance down the general line of battle. The brigade generally behaved with a steadiness and gallantry that was extremely gratifying. Colonel Gantt, Colonel Gaillard, Lieutenant- Colonel Nelson, Major Glover, and Captain Wilds, commanding regiments, discharged their duty with marked ability. Major Rion, of the Seventh South Carolina Battalion, and Captain Brooks, of the same, behaved with conspicuous gallantry, continuing with their commands, the former throughout the day and the latter until I ordered him to the rear after he had received three severe wounds. The severity of the fire of the enemy is illustrated by the fact that fifty-seven bullet marks were found upon the flag of the Seventh Battalion South Carolina Volunteers after the fight, and in one of its companies there were six
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