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McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
., gave General Wood his orders through one of my staff, who received them in person from Department Headquarters to move his other brigade at once to Gordon's Mills to support Colonel Harker, and at hve P. M. my staff officer reported to me at Ringgold. My entire Second and Third divisions were then at Ringgold. General Hazen, with his brigade, having crossed the river yesterday, rejoined his division (Palmer's) to-day. Colonel Deck, with Second brigade, Van Cleve's division, (left at McMinnville to guard stores,) rejoined his command on the ninth. Your instructions received at this time, and dated a quarter-past nine A. M., were to move with the balance of my corps on the Chickamauga and Pea Vine Valley roads, keeping in view two headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Commanding Corps. General,—I enclose you a dispatch marked A, and I now give you the orders of the commanding General, viz: to attack at day-dawn to
La Fayette (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
s official report): headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 12 P. M., September 10, 1863. Major-General Hindman, p towards it was the following order: headquarters, Lafayette, Ga., September 12, 1 A. M. General: The General commands orders to attack: headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., September 12. Lieutenant-General Polk: Gers, Braxton Bragg. headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12th, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Ct Adjutant General. headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., Sept. 12th, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Commandingthe following note: headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12. Lieutenant General Polk: Genereeping in view two headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Comt Adjutant-General. headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., Sept. 12, 1863. Lieut-General Polk, Commanding -Corps
Fayette (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
isolated, at our mercy. A march of twelve or fifteen miles at furthest would secure him. With this corps crushed we were free to march through Chatanooga, around the head of Lookout Mountain, and arrange matters with Thomas and McCook as they should attempt to pass northward. No serious opposition could have been offered to this movement by Steedman's force, as it was yet near Bridgeport. It was a mighty opportunity. The Confederate commander turned towards McCook. He concentrated at Fayette. This, as was expected by many, was a fruitless effort; for McCook was far away at Alpine; and the enemy, seven miles off, who had been the cause of our march, proved to be merely a small reconnoitering force. Then it was that the Confederate commander turned his attention to Crittenden. But it was the twelfth, and twenty-four hours had been lost—twenty-four as precious hours as were ever wasted. Instead of having his army across Crittenden's path, General Bragg had it at Lafayette. Th
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
ely isolated, was to the east and north, near Ringgold and Gordon's Mills. Two of Crittenden's divisions— Vancleve and Palmer—camped at Ringgold that night; the remaining division—Wood's—camped the saauga Valley towards Crittenden's position, at Ringgold and the Mills, moved to Lafayette, and then fth of Lafayette, and about seven southwest of Ringgold. It marks the intersection of roads leading avine Church and Greysville on the north, and Ringgold on the east; a line drawn from Ringgold to th. 13th, 8:30 A. M. General: My scouts from Ringgold have returned; no enemy there, and I believe hve P. M. my staff officer reported to me at Ringgold. My entire Second and Third divisions were then at Ringgold. General Hazen, with his brigade, having crossed the river yesterday, rejoined his he advance and near Tunnel Hill, to return to Ringgold with his command, and to follow on my line of left flank. He moved promptly and met me at Ringgold, and reported that the enemy was in force in [2 more.
Alpine, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
twelve or more miles to the south again of Gordon's Mills. The relation of the three corps of the enemy to the position of Bragg's force, in the Cove and at Anderson's, was then as follows: McCook was far away to the south of Lafayette, near Alpine, and Thomas to the west, well out of reach on the top of Lookout Mountain, while Crittenden, completely isolated, was to the east and north, near Ringgold and Gordon's Mills. Two of Crittenden's divisions— Vancleve and Palmer—camped at Ringgold t by Steedman's force, as it was yet near Bridgeport. It was a mighty opportunity. The Confederate commander turned towards McCook. He concentrated at Fayette. This, as was expected by many, was a fruitless effort; for McCook was far away at Alpine; and the enemy, seven miles off, who had been the cause of our march, proved to be merely a small reconnoitering force. Then it was that the Confederate commander turned his attention to Crittenden. But it was the twelfth, and twenty-four hours
Rossville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
earch of me, thinking I had taken the wrong road, were captured, he narrowly escaping. Early in the morning, Colonel Harker, with his brigade, was moved back to Rossville, and by night made a reconnoissance up the Rossville road, as far as Gordon's Mills, driving squads of the enemy before him. At half-past 2 P. M., gave General WRossville road, as far as Gordon's Mills, driving squads of the enemy before him. At half-past 2 P. M., gave General Wood his orders through one of my staff, who received them in person from Department Headquarters to move his other brigade at once to Gordon's Mills to support Colonel Harker, and at hve P. M. my staff officer reported to me at Ringgold. My entire Second and Third divisions were then at Ringgold. General Hazen, with his brigade, was in heavy force in the valley of Chattanooga, and instructing me to move my whole force across by the most available route, and as quickly as possible, to the Rossville and Lafayette road, to some defensible point between Gordon's Mills and Shield's House, and to close Wood up with me or myself to him. I at once called my genera
LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
early in the morning. My troops I cannot get into position in time to attack myself at so early as day-dawn. If I find he is not going to attacke, will attack him without delay. At day-dawn the Confederate cavalry were pushed out to develop the enemy, but none could be found. At 8:30 A. M., a brigade from each division was moved forward on each of the three roads, and still none could be found. Then came the following dispatch from General Pegram: headquarters 12 miles from Lafayette, Ala., road, Sept. 13th, 8:30 A. M. General: My scouts from Ringgold have returned; no enemy there, and I believe no enemy in the valley. I shall move up at once with my effective force to the road leading from this road, westwardly to Leet's tan-yard, where I had the first skirmish yesterday. Respectfully, etc., John Pegram, Brigadier General. To General Cheatham and General Armstrong. Continued search served only to confirm General Pegram's opinion. Excepting the outposts in
Greysville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
, we will find Rock Spring. It is about four miles southeast of the Mills, about twelve north of Lafayette, and about seven southwest of Ringgold. It marks the intersection of roads leading from Gordon's Mills on the west. Peavine Church and Greysville on the north, and Ringgold on the east; a line drawn from Ringgold to the Mills passes a few miles to the north of it; and it will be noticed that the Chickamauga flows between it and the Mills. To reach it from Lafayette General Polk had tothree miles, when the brigade was halted, and soon after returned to camp. From this it is plain that when General Bragg, at 6 oa clock, September 12th, was writing his order to Polk to attack Crittenden on the east of the Chickamauga on the Greysville road, Crittenden was west of the Chickamauga, at Lee and Gordon's Mills, and it is also evident that the General commanding the Confederate army, ordered his subordinate to make an attack in a direction in which there was no enemy, and then hel
Graysville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
General: I enclose you a dispatch marked A, and I now give you the orders of the Commanding General—viz. to attack at daydawn to-morrow the column reported in said dispatch, at three-quarters of a mile beyond Peavine Church, on the road to Graysville, from Lafayette. I am, General, etc., Geo. W. Brent, Assistant Adjutant General. headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., Sept. 12th, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Commanding Corps: General: The enemy is approaching from the s General,—I enclose you a dispatch marked A, and I now give you the orders of the commanding General, viz: to attack at day-dawn tomorrow the column reported in said dispatch, at three quarters of a mile beyond Peavine Church, on the road to Graysville from Lafayette. I am, General, etc., George W. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., Sept. 12, 1863. Lieut-General Polk, Commanding -Corps.- General,—The enemy is approach ing from the Sout<
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
awn to Lafayette, and Polk's and Walker's corps were moved immediately in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. In other words, the withdrawal to Lafayette was a necessary part of the movement of Polk and Walker in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. This is clearly the interpretation to be put upon General Bragg's statement—the one he intended. If the extract is a full statement of General Bragg's designs immediately after Hindman's failure, a glance at any good map of the State of Georgia will show how much useless marching was done by the forces that he wished to use against Crittenden. Polk lay at Anderson's, four miles from the Mills; Hindman and Walker were in McLemore's Cove. Polk was marched to Lafayette and then marched back to his original position. Hindman and Walker, instead of moving down the Chickamauga Valley towards Crittenden's position, at Ringgold and the Mills, moved to Lafayette, and then from Lafayette in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills.
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