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Port Royal, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
nd glorious), but until now neglected to do so. General Alexander says (Southern Historical Society Papers, Nos. 10 and 11 of Volume X, page 446), that Lieutenant Pelham, of Alabama, approached close upon the enemy's left flank with only two guns, and so punished his line of battle that the advance was checked until Pelham could be driven off, an operation which it took four batteries an hour to accomplish. Now, on that morning after an all-night march with Jackson's corps, from near Port Royal, our battery, with a number of other batteries, was put in position below the line of hills on which Fredericksburg is located. We were advanced by half-battery to the front, firing at our level best as we went forward. As we advanced, ours being the right section of the right battery, Captain Watson was approached by two mounted officers, one of whom I recognized as General J. E. B. Stuart, and the other, as I learned afterwards, being Colonel Rosser, who, after saluting our Captain, s
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
tter, which, at once and conclusively, shows that he has made a mistake. He says that when his gun was detached to follow General Stuart and Colonel Rosser, We were advanced by half battery to the front, firing at our level best as we went forward. That is, his gun was not detached until the engagement of the artillery had become general along the line. Now, Channing Price says that where Pelham was engaged with Henry's Napoleon, not a gun on our long line, from Fredericksburg to Hamilton's Crossing, had yet fired; only Pelham, with his Napoleon, and soon afterwards a Blakely, nearer the railroad. Every report of the battle confirms this statement. It is, therefore, very plain that Sergeant Pleasants's gallant detachment must have served one of the other guns which are particularized by Channing Price, and that the honor which has for so long a time been ascribed to Pelham and his Napoleon, cannot yet be given to another. H. B. McClellan. Lexington, Ky.. November 18th, 1884.
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
ft flank with only two guns, and so punished his line of battle that the advance was checked until Pelham could be driven off, an operation which it took four batteries an hour to accomplish. Now, on that morning after an all-night march with Jackson's corps, from near Port Royal, our battery, with a number of other batteries, was put in position below the line of hills on which Fredericksburg is located. We were advanced by half-battery to the front, firing at our level best as we went fo nearer the railroad. General Lee expressed his warm admiration for Major Pelham's distinguished gallantry, but said that the young Major-General (alluding to Stuart) had opened on them too soon. After describing the repulse of the enemy by Jackson's troops, and the renewal of the attack by the Federal troops, Lieutenant Price continues: A Parrott Gun of the Second Howitzers and one of the Powhatan battery, now crossed the Bowling Green road and opened a very destructive fire on their
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
in General Lee's report of the engaement. I have also read allusions of the same tenor in articles contributed to the Southern Historical Society Papers. I have, at each repetition of the error, thought I would write something for publication, giving the truth of this affair (which all seem to think so gallant and glorious), but until now neglected to do so. General Alexander says (Southern Historical Society Papers, Nos. 10 and 11 of Volume X, page 446), that Lieutenant Pelham, of Alabama, approached close upon the enemy's left flank with only two guns, and so punished his line of battle that the advance was checked until Pelham could be driven off, an operation which it took four batteries an hour to accomplish. Now, on that morning after an all-night march with Jackson's corps, from near Port Royal, our battery, with a number of other batteries, was put in position below the line of hills on which Fredericksburg is located. We were advanced by half-battery to the fron
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
The gallant Pelham and his gun at Fredericksburg. letter from Major H. B. Mcclellan. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary of the Southern Historical Society:r of other batteries, was put in position below the line of hills on which Fredericksburg is located. We were advanced by half-battery to the front, firing at our lat they might come up closer to our line. Not a gun on our long line, from Fredericksburg to Hamilton's Crossing, had yet fired, only Pelham with his Napoleon, and sHamilton's Crossing, had yet fired, only Pelham with his Napoleon, and soon afterwards a Blakley, nearer the railroad. General Lee expressed his warm admiration for Major Pelham's distinguished gallantry, but said that the young Major-G Pelham was engaged with Henry's Napoleon, not a gun on our long line, from Fredericksburg to Hamilton's Crossing, had yet fired; only Pelham, with his Napoleon, andHamilton's Crossing, had yet fired; only Pelham, with his Napoleon, and soon afterwards a Blakely, nearer the railroad. Every report of the battle confirms this statement. It is, therefore, very plain that Sergeant Pleasants's galla
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
in writing the story of General Stuart's campaigns, have been placed in my hands. Lieutenant Price writes thus in describing the events of the 13th December, 1862: I then galloped out to where General Stuart was [at the junction of the Bowling Green and Hamilton's Crossing roads, and there Major Pelham had come up with one gun of Harvey's Horse Artillery. The enemy were in dense masses, advancing straight towards our line of battle, and Pelham was exactly on their left flank with his gun. After describing the repulse of the enemy by Jackson's troops, and the renewal of the attack by the Federal troops, Lieutenant Price continues: A Parrott Gun of the Second Howitzers and one of the Powhatan battery, now crossed the Bowling Green road and opened a very destructive fire on their flank, under the direction of Colonel Rosser, Major Pelham commanding the others * * * * * * * * Galloping to the General I found him looking on with his usual coolness. He soon started towar
Pelham, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 99
l Stuart was [at the junction of the Bowling Green and Hamilton's Crossing roads, and there Major Pelham had come up with one gun of Harvey's Horse Artillery. The enemy were in dense masses, advancing straight towards our line of battle, and Pelham was exactly on their left flank with his gun, with no support whatever. He opened on them with solid shot, and though most of them went amongst the infantry, one blew up a caisson for the Yankees. They now opened about fifteen or twenty guns on Pelham; but he had splendid shelter for his gun, and only had one man wounded, I think. He kept up his fire until he was ordered to cease, so that they might come up closer to our line. Not a gun on our long line, from Fredericksburg to Hamilton's Crossing, had yet fired, only Pelham with his Napoleon, and soon afterwards a Blakley, nearer the railroad. General Lee expressed his warm admiration for Major Pelham's distinguished gallantry, but said that the young Major-General (alluding to Stuart)
Stuart, and by others, upon Major John Pelham, of the Stuart Horse Artillery, for the gallantry with which he fought one Napoleon gun upon the extreme Confederate right, at the opening of the battle of Fredericksburg, on the 13th of December, 1862, ro our line. Not a gun on our long line, from Fredericksburg to Hamilton's Crossing, had yet fired, only Pelham with his Napoleon, and soon afterwards a Blakley, nearer the railroad. General Lee expressed his warm admiration for Major Pelham's disti Napoleon, not a gun on our long line, from Fredericksburg to Hamilton's Crossing, had yet fired; only Pelham, with his Napoleon, and soon afterwards a Blakely, nearer the railroad. Every report of the battle confirms this statement. It is, therserved one of the other guns which are particularized by Channing Price, and that the honor which has for so long a time been ascribed to Pelham and his Napoleon, cannot yet be given to another. H. B. McClellan. Lexington, Ky.. November 18th, 1884.
E. Porter Alexander (search for this): chapter 99
nd company, even crediting our killed and wounded to the Horse Artillery. Subsequently, I read substantially the same in General Lee's report of the engaement. I have also read allusions of the same tenor in articles contributed to the Southern Historical Society Papers. I have, at each repetition of the error, thought I would write something for publication, giving the truth of this affair (which all seem to think so gallant and glorious), but until now neglected to do so. General Alexander says (Southern Historical Society Papers, Nos. 10 and 11 of Volume X, page 446), that Lieutenant Pelham, of Alabama, approached close upon the enemy's left flank with only two guns, and so punished his line of battle that the advance was checked until Pelham could be driven off, an operation which it took four batteries an hour to accomplish. Now, on that morning after an all-night march with Jackson's corps, from near Port Royal, our battery, with a number of other batteries, was
Halyburton (search for this): chapter 99
re, and at a long trot all the way. We finally got into a sunken road, with a wattling fence on either side, and lined with cedars. Down this road we went for some distance, with no idea whatever of our destination. We were halted in the narrow road, and ordered to make an opening in the fence. This was soon done, and a few spadefulls of earth thrown into the ditch made a passage-way. Colonel Rosser than told me to go up into the field and see what I had to do. I rode up with Halyburton, who was Orderly at the time, but had begged to be allowed to go with his old detachment, and so was with me, and found that we were on the extreme left flank of the Army of the Potomac. A battery was in position, commanding the field we were about to enter. Colonel Rosser told me to take any distance I chose to fight them, and in answer to my question as to how long I was expected to stay, said, As long as you can. I asked, Until we are out of ammunition? He answered, Yes I have of
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