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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
poignant. He who had wielded the supreme command of grand armies in a contest the most gigantic in the history of modern wars—who had presided over the destinies of the most puissant Republic in the sisterhood of nations and consorted with the princes of the earth—now lies trembling between life and death upon a couch of anguish and disappointment. Marvellous mutation in human fortune! But, my comrades, remembering him now as the generous victor who, at the ever memorable meeting at Appomattox, to our immortal Lee, and to the glorious eight thousand veterans—surviving heroes of the Army of Northern Virginia—on the 9th of April, 1865, conceded liberal and magnanimous terms of surrender, do we—standing by the graves of our Confederate Dead, and mindful of the memories which the observance of this occasion is designed to perpetuate —respectfully tender to General Grant assurances of our sincere and profound sympathy in this the season of his direful extremity. Let us now, m
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
of occupying the Charleston and Savannah railroad at Grahamville. This involved a march of only seven miles. This expedition was conceived in aid of General Sherman, who was known to be seeking the coast at some convenient point. By thus severing the communication between Savannah and Charleston, the former city would be completely isolated and Sherman enabled at pleasure, and without hazard, to cross the Savannah river at almost any point below Augusta, and establish communication with Port Royal, then the principal Federal depot on the south Atlantic coast. When General Hatch effected a landing at Boyd's Neck, the only Confederate force on duty at Grahamville was a part of a squadron of the Third South Carolina Cavalry. All available troops in the district had been sent into the interior to oppose General Sherman's advance. Colonel C. J. Colcock, the district commander, was fifty miles away, superintending the erection of field works at the principal crossings of the Savanna
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 22
The battle of Honey Hill. By Colonel C. C. Jones, Jr. Address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Georgia, April 27th, 1885. Friends and Comrades: Since our last annual convocation two members of the Confederate Cabinet have died. On the 7th of May, 1884, within the quiet walls of his apartments in the Avenue Jena, in Paris; the Hon. Judah P. Benjamin, full of years and of honors, entered upon his final rest. With a lucidity of intellect, a capacity for labor, and an ability quite remarkable, he had, during the existence of the Confederate Government, occupied in turn the offices of Attorney-General, Secretary of War, and Secretary of State. The struggle ended, he repaired to England, where, claiming the privileges of a natural born British subject, he was admitted to the bar and rose rapidly to the highest eminence capable of attainment by a practitioner in the most august courts of that realm. His success was most phenomenal. When he laid aside his gown
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ho was known to be seeking the coast at some convenient point. By thus severing the communication between Savannah and Charleston, the former city would be completely isolated and Sherman enabled at pleasure, and without hazard, to cross the Savannah river at almost any point below Augusta, and establish communication with Port Royal, then the principal Federal depot on the south Atlantic coast. When General Hatch effected a landing at Boyd's Neck, the only Confederate force on duty at Grahble troops in the district had been sent into the interior to oppose General Sherman's advance. Colonel C. J. Colcock, the district commander, was fifty miles away, superintending the erection of field works at the principal crossings of the Savannah river. The Federals having landed at Boyd's Neck at eight o'clock on the morning of the 29th of November, at a remove of only seven miles from the railroad, and there being at the time no Confederate forces in the neighborhood capable of successfu
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
son retreat in the event that it became expedient to evacuate that city. By this route also were re-enforcements expected. General Hardee had no troops which could be detailed for this important service, except two regular Confederate regiments from Charleston, and it was feared that they would arrive too late for the emergency. Not a moment could be lost, and it was urged upon General Smith that if he would move at once and hold the enemy in check, several thousand troops, en route from North and South Carolina for the re-enforcement of the garrison at Savannah, would appear and ensure the effectual repulse of the Federals. Although the statute organizing the State forces confined their service and operations to the limits of Georgia; although, strictly speaking, there rested upon these troops no legal obligation to move beyond the confines of their own State, whose territory they were instructed to defend; although General Smith had a qualified authority from Governor Brown to
Grahamville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
mmediately to proceed with his command to Grahamville, South Carolina, to repel an advance of the Federals, whomorning, the 30th of November, arrived at Grahamville, South Carolina, with his leading brigade. The conduct ooccupying the Charleston and Savannah railroad at Grahamville. This involved a march of only seven miles. Thisyd's Neck, the only Confederate force on duty at Grahamville was a part of a squadron of the Third South Caroluting their advance, had they moved promptly upon Grahamville the Charleston and Savannah railroad would, beyonto pass unimproved. Colonel Colcock arrived at Grahamville about seven o'clock on the morning of the 30th, aBolan's Church, and was then only five miles from Grahamville. A line of breastworks, previously constructed fy and field artillery, being equi-distant between Grahamville and the church, it became all-important that the e morning of the 1st of December, concentrated at Grahamville in numbers sufficient to confirm the fruits of th
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
obligation to move beyond the confines of their own State, whose territory they were instructed to defend; although General Smith had a qualified authority from Governor Brown to withdraw the Georgia State forces under his command from Confederate service in case they were ordered beyond the limits of the State, and although his men were almost broken down by fatigue and want of rest, realizing that the battle for the salvation of the metropolis of Georgia was on the instant to be fought on Carolina soil, and, after a full conference with the Lieutenant-General, becoming satisfied that it was right and proper the movement should be made, General Smith issued the requisite orders, and, about eight o'clock on Wednesday morning, the 30th of November, arrived at Grahamville, South Carolina, with his leading brigade. The conduct of that officer and the Georgia State troops in this emergency will be remembered with pride and satisfaction. On Tuesday, the 29th of November, a Federal force
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
onstituted leader in that mighty war which consolidated the energies, the patriotism, and the supreme devotion of this land, to him the first honorary member of this Association, and the only one complimented with the badge which we, as active members, so fondly cherish, do we—giving expression to sentiments which are dominant in the breasts of thousands—cordially tender our sympathies in this the season of his declining years and multiplying infirmities, hoping that it will please a kind Providence to lengthen out his illustrious life for the joy of kindred and the further respect and honor of this age. Verily hath his soul brooked the turning tide With that untaught, innate philosophy Which, be it wisdom, coldness, or deep pride, Is gall and wormwood to an enemy. With a sedate and all enduring eye, he remains ‘unbow'd beneath the ills upon him piled.’ Heaven grant he may never find ‘That life protracted, is protracted woe.’ There is another—not a Confederate—who, st
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 22
he queenly magnolia grandiflora, redolent of the perfumes of a semi-tropical region, fanned by the soft breezes which blow from the Gulf, and hallowed by exhibitions of respect, affection, and veneration most sincere, the exPres-ident of the Confederacy, now well-stricken in years, has recently been confined to a couch of pain, sensible of the infirmities inseparable from old age, and suffering from the effects of a wound encountered in the military service of this nation during the war with Mexico. Since the hush of that great storm which convulsed our land, and in which he was entrusted with the main conduct of the fortunes of the Confederate States, he has borne himself with a dignity and a composure, with a fidelity to the traditions of a consecrated past, with a just observance of the proprieties of the situation, and with an exalted heroism worthy of all admiration. Conspicuous for his gallantry and ability as an officer of the army, prominent as a secretary, senator and states
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
and it was feared that they would arrive too late for the emergency. Not a moment could be lost, and it was urged upon General Smith that if he would move at once and hold the enemy in check, several thousand troops, en route from North and South Carolina for the re-enforcement of the garrison at Savannah, would appear and ensure the effectual repulse of the Federals. Although the statute organizing the State forces confined their service and operations to the limits of Georgia; although, strf the Georgia State Line, for their conspicuous gallantry at Griswoldville in this State; and especially for their unselfish patriotism in leaving their State and meeting the enemy on the memorable and well fought battlefield at Honey Hill in South Carolina. The State with pride records this gallant conduct of her militia, and feels assured that when an emergency again arises State lines will be forgotten by her militia, and a patriotism exhibited which knows nothing but our whole country.
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