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Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
the balance of a very disagreeably cold night. The monitors bombarded Sumter all night. Battery Gregg, on Morris Island, Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island kept up the fight, and did some excellent shooting. The monitors would belch out columns of flame from their 15-inch guns in their turrets. When the shot fteen 11-inch broadside and 200-pound Parrott bow and stern guns of the Ironsides, added to the thunders of Moultrie, Johnson, and the batteries on James and Sullivan's Islands, made an artillery fight the fury and grandeur of which can hardly be conceived. It is beyond my powers of description, surpassing the most highly-colored h.—The enemy's ironclad fleet came up this morning, and a tremendous artillery fight took place between these vessels and Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island. A night attack was made on Fort Sumter, but the garrison was prepared and the attack was a most signal failure. As none of the Twenty-fifth South Carolina
Taylors Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
thence by way of Legare's Upper and Lower House to Battery Island. After passing Legare's Lower House, it ran quite near the creek which separates James from Taylor's Island. Just below the Lower House a road leaves it and goes across a causeway and bridge to Taylor's Island. The marsh on the side of the peninsula, towards CharlTaylor's Island. The marsh on the side of the peninsula, towards Charleston, is nearly or quite half a mile wide. This marsh, and the creek near its middle, was crossed on a military bridge, quite substantial but too narrow at first for vehicles. It was afterwards built a little higher up towards the head of the marsh, and made wide enough for any purpose. This bridge struck the mainland of Jamestono, a little above Battery Island, and opened an enfilading fire of time-fuse shells on my line. At the same time a brisk fire was opened with rockets from Taylor's Island. Two sizes were used, and for about a half hour the firing was very rapid. I am inclined to think that on this occasion they were trying experiments with som
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
the second line was finished. There is plenty of evidence near this one, in the marks of shot and shell, of the effectiveness of the fire of the Secessionville battery. Sergeant Haney, of a Federal regiment, is buried near by. This we learn from his marked grave. Captain James M. Carson, of Company A, picked up a memorandum made by a Federal officer, showing the troops which had been on the island and opposed to our forces. These troops were: Rockwell's battery, Hamilton's battery, Rhode Island and New York batteries; Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, and Seventy-ninth New York volunteers; Forty-fifth, Fiftieth, Fifty-fifth, Sixty-seventh, Ninety-seventh, and One Hundredth Pennsylvania volunteers; Eighth and Ninth Maine volunteers; Fourth New Hampshire volunteers; First and Twenty-eighth Massachusetts volunteers; Eighth Rhode Island, Seventh Connecticut and Eighth Michigan volunteers; total, eighteen regiments and four batteries. General H. W. Benham had been in command
Adam's Run (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
The enemy did not fire, though they were quite near. It was not our purpose to interfere with the working by bringing on an engagement. It was reported to-day that one of our scouts had gotten near enough to the enemy's camp to count seventy coffins for the killed in the engagement yesterday, and to overhear their pickets discussing the fight. They spoke of a mounted officer having been killed, and said that they got the worst of the fight. General N. G. Evans arrived to-day from Adams Run with three additional regiments. He is now the ranking brigadier on the island. June 14th, 1862.—Eight companies of the battalion, under the command of Colonel Simonton, marched to the Presbyterian church for picket duty this morning. Three of these companies under my command were sent forward to the forks of the road below the church. The battery in front of Secessionville, under the command of Colonel J. B. Lamar of the First regiment of artillery of South Carolina volunteers, foug
Barnwell Court House (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
t Fort Pickens and Green Creek Bridge, and early in the morning of the 14th day of April, 1862, the Wee Nees came up to the city, and thence to their homes, on a furlough, which was granted to the whole company preparatory to their entering upon their third term of service, for which they had enlisted. The furlough of the Wee Nees was not as long as they had expected. In less than two weeks from the time they reached home an order was sent to me to report with the company at Bamberg, in Barnwell district. This did not accord with our plans. The men had re-enlisted with the understanding that they were to form a part of a new regiment. It was expected that when the companies which intended to go into the new organization should be called together, they would assemble in Charleston. The Washington Light Infantry (two companies, A and B) were in the field on James Island. It will be remembered that they succeeded the Wee Nees as the garrison of Fort Pickens on Battery Island. I
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
wo companies, A and B) were in the field on James Island. It will be remembered that they succeeded in the creek which separates Taylor's from James Island, and one of the enemy's gunboats was a littg across it from the marsh, which separates James Island from Long Island, to the marsh bordering thurpose. This bridge struck the mainland of James Island as one travels from Secessionville towards —There were no further active operations on James Island during the summer. Picketing, watching ande force on the outside. The batteries on James Island kept up an unremitting fire and were doingbit of sending boats from the creek between James Island and Morris Island, around Cummins Point and from the creek which separates Morris from James Island, and when the keels of the boats struck thech separates Folly Island from Taylor's and James Island towards Folly Inlet, passed between this pot our troops while the regiment remained at James Island. Very few of them exploded. They went in [18 more...]
West Branch Cooper River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
a, and went to the city, in obedience to orders received the previous week, for the purpose of taking my seat as a member of a court-martial. I went in the cart which belonged to the post, and was driven by Private Garner to the camp of the regiment, commanded by Colonel L. M. Keitt. After a soldier's breakfast with the Colonel and my friend, Dantzler, who had left the First regiment and been promoted to be Lieutenant-Colonel, these gentlemen kindly sent a detail of men to row me across Cooper river to Charleston. Their camp was almost opposite White Point. Colonel J. Foster Marshall was president of the court, Captain J. M. Perrin, of Gregg's old regiment, who had been my much esteemed friend in the Fort Sumter campaign, now a captain in Colonel Marshall's regiment, was judge advocate. Colonel J. M. Gadberry, Major Edward Manigault, Major——White, and Captain J. V. Glover were members of the court. The court sat at the Military Hall, on Wentworth street, in the room usually occup
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 1.15
useless mouths to feed and no women and children to be endangered in case the city was reduced to a state of siege. There was a report in circulation that the citizens of Charleston had resolved to make it a second Moscow, rather than allow it to fall into the hands of the enemy. There was, probably, some such talk, but such purpose was not seriously entertained by any considerable number of the thinking portion of the population. The burning of Moscow destroyed Napoleon's army and saved Russia because of the rigor of the climate. No such effect would have been produced on the Federal army by the destruction of Charleston. With our coast and harbors in the possession of the enemy, the United States army had a base of operation which the destruction of every house in Charleston would not materially affect. If the advantage gained at Port Royal had been followed by an immediate advance and vigorous attack by land and sea on Charleston, that city would have fallen. The delay of t
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
so that there would be no useless mouths to feed and no women and children to be endangered in case the city was reduced to a state of siege. There was a report in circulation that the citizens of Charleston had resolved to make it a second Moscow, rather than allow it to fall into the hands of the enemy. There was, probably, some such talk, but such purpose was not seriously entertained by any considerable number of the thinking portion of the population. The burning of Moscow destroyed Napoleon's army and saved Russia because of the rigor of the climate. No such effect would have been produced on the Federal army by the destruction of Charleston. With our coast and harbors in the possession of the enemy, the United States army had a base of operation which the destruction of every house in Charleston would not materially affect. If the advantage gained at Port Royal had been followed by an immediate advance and vigorous attack by land and sea on Charleston, that city would hav
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
alance of a very disagreeably cold night. The monitors bombarded Sumter all night. Battery Gregg, on Morris Island, Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island kept up the fight, and did some excellent shooting. The monitors would belch le as they were lifted up to throw the sand out of the trench on the side towards us. Our James Island batteries and Fort Moultrie were cannonading the enemy's trenches all day. The fleet came up, as was the custom, early in the morning, and openedere. Both men and officers got so they could sleep under fire when permitted to take a little rest. The shells from Fort Moultrie passed directly over the salient, and as they were now timed to burst just two hundred yards beyond us, the danger oe enemy's ironclad fleet came up this morning, and a tremendous artillery fight took place between these vessels and Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island. A night attack was made on Fort Sumter, but the garrison was prepared and th
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