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Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
his point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers went up from the multitude congregated at this, what seemed to be the centre place of interest to a large number. The Hanover cavalry received loud cheering as they passed the house and raised their hats. The eyes of every company rested upon the house in passing. The military companies were ordered to Right shoulder arms, and Lee Camp Drum Corps and the Navy Post Band of Norfolk each played Dixie. All of the veterans marched by with bared heads. Each of the bands played upon this square and all of the cavalry buglers sounded a call. There seemed to be a solemn inspiration felt by the soldiers as they passed, for their movement was steady and dignified. While ascending the hill between Fifth and Seventh streets the companies made an exceptionally fine appearance and the regularity of the steps and position in line was the occasion of complimentary comment from
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
vernor Lee and General Wade Hampton, who headed the line, uncovered their heads and held their hats in their hands until they had passed the house of General Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two generals were the recipients of loud cheers at this point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers went up from the multitude congregated at this, what seemed to be the centre place of interest to a large number. The Hanover cavalry received loud cheering as they passed the house and raised their hats. The eyes of every company rested upon the house in passing. The military companies were ordered to Right shoulder arms, and Lee Camp Drum Corps and the Navy Post Band of Norfolk each played Dixie. All of the veterans marched by with bared heads. Each of the bands played upon this square and all of the cavalry buglers sounded a call. There seemed to be a solemn inspiration felt by the soldiers as they passe
ne appearance and the regularity of the steps and position in line was the occasion of complimentary comment from those below. The decorations on the porch of the Lee House included the coat-of-arms of Virginia and the Lee family. The legend of the former, sic semper tyrannis; that of Lee, non in cautus futuri. [Not unmindful of futurity.] The scene as the head of the column left Franklin street and marched into the Lee Monument grounds was very inspiring. General Wade Hampton and Our Fitz—par nobile fratrum—riding at the head as lovingly as when in other days they commanded the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, the cavalry escort, the distinguished guests in carriages, and the veterans, military, &c., comprising the procession—all combined to make a brilliant pageant. The Confederate veterans from the Soldiers' Home surrounded the statue of Fame Crowning Lee, which they unveiled, and to which they fired a salute just as the head of the column came up. It was touch<
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.13
assed the house and raised their hats. The eyes of every company rested upon the house in passing. The military companies were ordered to Right shoulder arms, and Lee Camp Drum Corps and the Navy Post Band of Norfolk each played Dixie. All of the veterans marched by with bared heads. Each of the bands played upon this square . The decorations on the porch of the Lee House included the coat-of-arms of Virginia and the Lee family. The legend of the former, sic semper tyrannis; that of Lee, non in cautus futuri. [Not unmindful of futurity.] The scene as the head of the column left Franklin street and marched into the Lee Monument grounds was very i, &c., comprising the procession—all combined to make a brilliant pageant. The Confederate veterans from the Soldiers' Home surrounded the statue of Fame Crowning Lee, which they unveiled, and to which they fired a salute just as the head of the column came up. It was touching to witness the enthusiasm of the veterans as they
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 1.13
Incidents of the parade. Passing Lee's residence. When the procession turned up Franklin street from Eighth, Governor Lee and General Wade Hampton, who headed the line, uncovered their heads and held their hats in their hands until they had passed the house of General Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two generals were the recipients of loud cheers at this point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers wentily. The legend of the former, sic semper tyrannis; that of Lee, non in cautus futuri. [Not unmindful of futurity.] The scene as the head of the column left Franklin street and marched into the Lee Monument grounds was very inspiring. General Wade Hampton and Our Fitz—par nobile fratrum—riding at the head as lovingly as when in other days they commanded the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, the cavalry escort, the distinguished guests in carriages, and the veterans, military, &c., c
olumn came up. It was touching to witness the enthusiasm of the veterans as they recognized so many of their old leaders, and greeted them with a regular old Confederate yell, which, if not as strong as when they used to proclaim their victories, was at least as hearty and sincere. The grand-stand (to which only those especially invited were admitted) which held over one thousand people, was soon filled to its utmost capacity, while thousands stood in the mud and rain on the outside. As the Marine Band played We'll be Gay and Happy Still, Dixie, Star-Spangled Banner, &c., the veterans, the Grand Lodge of Virginia Masons, and other organizations marched to their places. Despite the constant drizzle, which soon came on to a hard rain, the people held their places with amazing patience throughout the exercises. A veteran voiced the sentiments of all when he said: We used to follow Marse Bob much worse weather than this, and surely we can cheerfully bear this to do him honor.
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 1.13
Incidents of the parade. Passing Lee's residence. When the procession turned up Franklin street from Eighth, Governor Lee and General Wade Hampton, who headed the line, uncovered their heads and held their hats in their hands until they had passed the house of General Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two genGovernor Lee and General Wade Hampton, who headed the line, uncovered their heads and held their hats in their hands until they had passed the house of General Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two generals were the recipients of loud cheers at this point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers went up from the multitude congregated at this, what seemed to be the centre place of interest to a large number. The Hanover cavalry received loud cheering as they pasGeneral Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two generals were the recipients of loud cheers at this point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers went up from the multitude congregated at this, what seemed to be the centre place of interest to a large number. The Hanover cavalry received loud cheering as they passed the house and raised their hats. The eyes of every company rested upon the house in passing. The military companies were ordered to Right shoulder arms, and Lee Camp Drum Corps and the Navy Post Band of Norfolk each played Dixie. All of the veterans marched by with bared heads. Each of the bands played upon this square an