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ongress, and one of the framers and signers of the Confederate Constitution, died at an advanced age in Fairfax county, Virginia; and, during the month of March, the Hon. William E. Smith, at first in the field and then a representative from Georgia in the Confederate Congress, and Major-General Jones M. Withers, from Alabama, entered into rest. Within the circle of our immediate companionship we chronicle the death of H. L. Sponsler, —veterinary surgeon in Cobb's Legion of Cavalry, on the 9th of last June: of Elmore A. Dunbar, color bearer of the 63rd regiment Georgia infantry, on the 24th of the same month: of Charles N. Bignon, private in Company B, Capers' battalion, on the 7th of October: of the soldierly J. O. Clarke, lieutenant-colonel of the 1st regiment Georgia infantry, on the 6th of December: of Charles M. Peck, second lieutenant and drill-master C. S. A., on the 4th of February last: and, sixteen days afterwards, of James Kelly, private in the 7th regiment of Georgia ca
ailroad near station number one, formed the extreme right of the Federal investment. After crossing Ebenezer creek on the 8th of December, General Kilpatrick concentrated his cavalry on the Monteith road, ten miles south of Springfield; and, until the 13th, moved in rear of the 17th army corps, with detachments covering the rear of the other army corps. King's bridge having been burnt by the Confederates, Kilpatrick crossed the Great Ogeechee on a pontoon bridge on the afternoon of the 13th, and moved in heavy force through the counties of Bryan and Liberty, seeking to communicate with the Federal fleet by way of Kilkenny bluff and Sunbury. Returning on the 16th, he went into camp in the vicinity of King's bridge, picketing and plundering the country south of the Ogeechee. The attempt of Colonel Atkins, with two thousand cavalry, supported by a division of infantry under General Mower, to destroy the railway bridge over the Altamaha river was thwarted. Upon the first appea
crossed the Great Ogeechee on a pontoon bridge on the afternoon of the 13th, and moved in heavy force through the counties of Bryan and Liberty, seeking to communicate with the Federal fleet by way of Kilkenny bluff and Sunbury. Returning on the 16th, he went into camp in the vicinity of King's bridge, picketing and plundering the country south of the Ogeechee. The attempt of Colonel Atkins, with two thousand cavalry, supported by a division of infantry under General Mower, to destroy the r forward to Argyle Island. The artillery fire increased in intensity; and for several days, commencing on the 15th of December, Beaulieu battery was shelled by two mortar boats and two gun-boats and by a rifle gun posted on Greene island. On the 16th the Confederate forces were strengthened by the arrival of General Ferguson's brigade of dismounted cavalry. The following day General Sherman demanded the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts, accompanying his summons with the threat
which could be procured. The scarcity of flats compelled the engineer in charge to lash them end to end and not side to side as is usual in the construction of pontoon bridges of this description. Above the stringers was a flooring of plank obtained from the city wharves. At eight o'clock on the evening of the 17th the first pontoon bridge, spanning the Savannah river from the foot of West Broad street to Hutchinson's Island, was completed, and by half-past 8 o'clock P. M. on Monday, the 19th, the remaining bridges were finished and the route was in readiness for the retreat of the Confederate garrison. Heavy fogs and difficulties encountered in finding and concentrating the requisite number of flats caused some delay in the execution of this important work, but, in view of the character of the labor and the scarcity of materials, it was consummated with commendable rapidity and in a very substantial manner. These bridges were built by sailors from the Confederate navy and by
, and in bloody battle he had, during more than four years of exposure, privation and carnage, essayed to check. On the 20th of the following month, Colonel A. C. Myers, first quartermaster-general of the Confederacy, passed quietly away; and on the inundated fields and fill the ditches and canals. It is claimed that everything was in readiness on the evening of the 20th, and that the early capture of the garrison of Savannah was confidently anticipated. General Sherman had left orders thatd the carriages, and thrown all ammunition into the water, concentrated at Fort Jackson at 8 o'clock on the evening of the 20th, whence, under the command of Colonel Edward C. Anderson, they were conveyed by steamer to Screven's ferry, marching thencer had arranged his plans and the excellent behavior of his troops in executing them. Although, during the night of the 20th, General Geary reported to General Williams, commanding the 20th army corps, that the Confederate movement across the Sava
reast of Fort Jackson on the night of the 20th. The ironclad Savannah, Captain Brent, being unable to proceed to sea in consequence of the torpedoes in the river and a strong gale setting from the northeast, after having, on the morning of the 21st, remained for some time in the neighborhood of Screven's ferry, where a detail was engaged in the removal of some quartermaster and commissary stores, and having returned the artillery fire of the enemy from the bay, was burnt nearly opposite Willworks below the city. General Geary was temporarily assigned to the command of Savannah, and his division encamped within the city limits. Near the junction of the Louisville and Augusta roads, and about half-past 4 o'clock in the morning of the 21st, the Hon. Richard D. Arnold, mayor of Savannah, and a delegation from the Board of Aldermen, bearing a flag of truce, met that officer and through him made formal surrender of the city just evacuated by the Confederates. Eleven times consecutiv
al record of each recurring year are we reminded, my comrades, that the mortality among those who were actively engaged in the military and civil service of the Confederacy is augmenting in a rapidly increasing ratio. We had scarcely departed from this hall, a twelve month ago, when we were apprised of the death near Paris, France, in absolute retirement and at a very advanced age, of the Hon. A. Dudley Mann, who, during the war, was entrusted with an important diplomatic mission. On the 31st of last May, S. P. Moore, Surgeon-General of the Con federate States, was overtaken by that gaunt foe whose grim advances in camp, in hospital, and in bloody battle he had, during more than four years of exposure, privation and carnage, essayed to check. On the 20th of the following month, Colonel A. C. Myers, first quartermaster-general of the Confederacy, passed quietly away; and on the 25th of September Lieutenant-General D. H. Hill—the hero of Big Bethel, conspicuous for his gallantry
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 1.8
s sacrifices, the dignity and rectitude of its aims, the nobility of its pursuit, and the magnitude and the brilliancy of the deeds performed in its support, yielded his great spirit into the hands of the God who gave it. It was the privilege of this Association to render conspicuous honor to his memory; and, in a manner most emphatic and appropriate, to participate in the general grief and heartfelt adoration which pervaded the entire territory once claimed by the Confederacy. On the 3d of February the Hon. William W. Boyce, a member from South Carolina of the Confederate Congress, and one of the framers and signers of the Confederate Constitution, died at an advanced age in Fairfax county, Virginia; and, during the month of March, the Hon. William E. Smith, at first in the field and then a representative from Georgia in the Confederate Congress, and Major-General Jones M. Withers, from Alabama, entered into rest. Within the circle of our immediate companionship we chronicle the
February 4th (search for this): chapter 1.8
p we chronicle the death of H. L. Sponsler, —veterinary surgeon in Cobb's Legion of Cavalry, on the 9th of last June: of Elmore A. Dunbar, color bearer of the 63rd regiment Georgia infantry, on the 24th of the same month: of Charles N. Bignon, private in Company B, Capers' battalion, on the 7th of October: of the soldierly J. O. Clarke, lieutenant-colonel of the 1st regiment Georgia infantry, on the 6th of December: of Charles M. Peck, second lieutenant and drill-master C. S. A., on the 4th of February last: and, sixteen days afterwards, of James Kelly, private in the 7th regiment of Georgia cavalry, Young's brigade. Although they pass Into the eternal shadow That girds our life around, Into the infinite silence Wherewith Death's chore is bound, to our welcoming vision on this Memorial Day They come transfigured back Secure from change in their high-hearted ways, Beautiful evermore, and with the rays Of Morn on their white shields of expectation. The united and strenuous
of this Association to render conspicuous honor to his memory; and, in a manner most emphatic and appropriate, to participate in the general grief and heartfelt adoration which pervaded the entire territory once claimed by the Confederacy. On the 3d of February the Hon. William W. Boyce, a member from South Carolina of the Confederate Congress, and one of the framers and signers of the Confederate Constitution, died at an advanced age in Fairfax county, Virginia; and, during the month of March, the Hon. William E. Smith, at first in the field and then a representative from Georgia in the Confederate Congress, and Major-General Jones M. Withers, from Alabama, entered into rest. Within the circle of our immediate companionship we chronicle the death of H. L. Sponsler, —veterinary surgeon in Cobb's Legion of Cavalry, on the 9th of last June: of Elmore A. Dunbar, color bearer of the 63rd regiment Georgia infantry, on the 24th of the same month: of Charles N. Bignon, private in Comp
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