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gallant officer; Brigadier-General Lucius J. Gartrell, of Georgia, an eloquent advocate and an ex-member of Confederate Congress; Colonel Daniel G. Fowle, a true Confederate, and, at the time of his sudden death, occupying the gubernatorial chair of North Carolina; and Brigadier-General John R. Cooke, of Missouri, accredited by official appointment to the Old North State, have all succumbed to the attack of the Black Knight with visor down, whose onset none may successfully resist. On the second day succeeding the delivery of this address, April 29th, Brigadier-General Armistead Lindsay Long, late Chief of Artillery of the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the military biographer of General Robert E. Lee, Crossed the river, and rested with his immortal Chief. Laying to heart the lesson of this Memorial season, and remembering that we, too, are powerless to elude Mortality's strong hand, let us, my friends, contemplate with composure and anticipate with philosoph
replied, nearly breathless, Yes; confound them, they have got me again. He had just come back to us from prison, having been captured at Gettysburg. That night we remained on the battle field of Dinwiddie Courthouse, where the dead of the 31st of March were still lying unburied around. There were, perhaps, two thousand of us gathered together, captured in the day's battle. The next morning our march commenced towards Petersburg, and after a march of three days we reached City Point on the 4th, having nothing to eat until the night of the 3d. When near Petersburg we received a small amount of crackers and meat. At City Point several transport steamers were lying, and we were ordered on board of them, each boat being packed with human freight to its full capacity. Unwilling passengers. Some of the boats landed their unwilling passengers at Newport's News, while most of them, and the one I was on, reached Point Lookout on the morning of the 5th. Landing at the wharf, we we
Duncan, I could have charged and overturned every skeleton of a horse in his company. But the men were all true tar-heels, and there was no braver man than Captain Strange. On the afternoon of the 10th the artillery was ordered back on the south side, and preparations made to leave Weldon. According to Captain Webb, there were then at that point about five hundred men, including at least seventy-five stragglers, furloughed men, convalescents from the hospitals, and detailed men. On the 12th the command to leave Weldon was given. Captain Webb was ordered to take charge of the column and start towards Raleigh, keeping as near the railroad as possible. By 10 o'clock A. M., the column was well on its way in good order, the objective being, if possible, to join General Johnston at or near Raleigh. We marched about sixteen miles that day. For several days previous to our departure, and even while the artillery was on the north side of the river, everything was done to put the f
able engagement at Shiloh, was complimented with our final tokens of respect. Lieutenant-Colonel William Peter Crawford, of the Twenty-eighth regiment Georgia infantry, Colquitt's brigade, Hoke's division, Army of Northern Virginia, died on the 13th of last January; and, on the following day, we were advised of the demise of our fellow member, Willinton Kushman, private in Company F, Sixth regiment South Carolina infantry, Jenkins' brigade, Kershaw's division, Longstreet's corps, Army of Nortwere parcelled out and assigned to the different regular organizations, and everything in the way of stores sent off by rail up the Raleigh and Gaston railroad. The bridge, however, remained in statu quo, and was not burned until the night of the 13th, two days after we had marched away. One of the duties imposed upon the men of our battery, just before leaving Weldon, was the collection and destruction of boats along the river, so that, upon the burning of the bridge, communication with the n
s, from which I returned about 9:30 P. M. With few dissenting votes it was decided to send a flag of truce to Sherman, tendering our surrender upon the same terms allowed Lee's army. Lieutenant Blount had returned about 8 P. M., reporting that he had gone within twelve miles of Raleigh, and getting what he deemed reliable information that Sherman was in possession of the city, on his return, in obedience to orders, he had burned the railroad bridge over Cedar Creek. On the morning of the 15th, the general announced an entirely different programme from that determined upon the evening before. That now announced was, to abandon the artillery, and all except absolutely necessary supplies, and with the whole command in as light order as possible, mounted on artillery horses and transportation animals, as far as could be done, and armed as best we could, try to get to Johnston by passing around Sherman's rear. This change met with wide-spread dissatisfaction, but nothing further was
n entirely different programme from that determined upon the evening before. That now announced was, to abandon the artillery, and all except absolutely necessary supplies, and with the whole command in as light order as possible, mounted on artillery horses and transportation animals, as far as could be done, and armed as best we could, try to get to Johnston by passing around Sherman's rear. This change met with wide-spread dissatisfaction, but nothing further was done that day. On the 16th (Sunday), the general was urged by some of his officers to carry out at once the plan originally decided upon, to surrender; for they were satisfied they could not control their men longer. He promised to take the matter under consideration and announce his final decision at an assembly of all the forces that evening. The plan finally adopted was, to try and cut his way through to Johnston with all who would volunteer to follow him, the others to disband and go home as best they could. Abo
and other ceremonies, the President of this Association, in deference to the unusual attractions of the day, curtailed his annual address of its customary proportions. The Address. Ten times since our last annual convocation has Death's pale flag been advanced within the lists of our Association, and as often has some member responded to the inexorable summons of the fell sergeant who bore it. Henry Cranston, major and commissary of subsistence, died on, the 6th of last May. On the 18th of the following August, D. B. Gillison, private in the Third company of Goodwin's brigade, South Carolina State troops, was borne to our Confederate section in the city cemetery. There, nine days afterwards, we laid our battle-scarred companion, A. M. White, private in Company G, Tenth regiment Georgia infantry, Bryan's brigade, McLaw's division, Longstreet's corps, Army of Northern Virginia; and, within the sequent week, like sepulture was accorded to Earle L. Jennings, private in Company
manding U S. Forces, Raleigh, N. C.: General: Finding that General Johnston has surrendered his army, of which my commands forms a part, I have the honor to surrender the command, with a request that the same terms be allowed me as were allowed General Johnston's army. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, L. S. Baker, Brigadier-General, C S. A. A rumor reached us to-night, that President Lincoln had been assassinated. About 5 o'clock P. M. on the 20th, our flag returned with a letter from General Sherman to General Baker, stating that General Johnston had not surrendered, but that terms had been agreed upon between them for a cessation of hostilities and the restoration of peace. Accompanying the letter was a copy of the agreement. The letter gave General Baker the right to disband his force upon the terms granted Lee's army. The general, deeming it best to accept these terms, issued the following order: (General order no. 25.) head
severe wound encountered in the rage of battle, entered into rest. On the 30th of December, W. B. Kuhlke, First corporal of Company D, Twelfth battalion Georgia infantry, genial, and proud of his honorable scars received in the memorable engagement at Shiloh, was complimented with our final tokens of respect. Lieutenant-Colonel William Peter Crawford, of the Twenty-eighth regiment Georgia infantry, Colquitt's brigade, Hoke's division, Army of Northern Virginia, died on the 13th of last January; and, on the following day, we were advised of the demise of our fellow member, Willinton Kushman, private in Company F, Sixth regiment South Carolina infantry, Jenkins' brigade, Kershaw's division, Longstreet's corps, Army of Northern Virginia. On the 20th of March the earthly ties which bound us to our friend and comrade Ker Boyce—major and quartermaster of Evans' brigade, Gordon's division, Early's corps, Army of Northen Virginia—were sundered. Within the past twelve-month the follow
January 17th (search for this): chapter 3
ssion by waving of handkerchiefs and clapping of hands. Many of the houses were decorated with the Stars and Stripes and the Confederate battle-flag. Portraits of General Lee were also numerously displayed. The Stars and Stripes were carried in line by nearly all of the parading organizations. Captain Daniel M. Lee was chief marshal. Atlanta, Georgia. In Atlanta the day was generally observed, markedly by the Virginia Society composed of natives of Virginia. Saturday evening, January 17th, Captain W. Gordon McCabe, reached the city. He came as the guest of the Virginia Society, and as the orator of the day. At the Capitol. The exercises at the Capitol were held in the House of Representatives, and commenced promptly at 8 o'clock. President Hamilton Douglas called the society to order, and after prayer by the chaplain, the Rev. Mr. Funsten, Captain McCabe was introduced. His address was upon the Life of Lee and The Defence of Petersburg. The hall was crowded with a
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