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Martins Crossroads (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ay, April 21st) we turned our faces homeward, feeling as if a heavy weight had been lifted off our shoulders, and relieved that the suspense was over. Captain Webb, who was going to join his wife on the Blackwater, accompanied the Perquimans county boys, of whom there was about a dozen. This party kept well together, until just before reaching Halifax, when Captain Webb, Wm. H. Whedbee and I pushed on ahead. I quote again from the captain's diary: On Sunday, the 23d of April, at Martin's Cross-Roads, Northampton county, N. C., I parted from Mullen and Whedbee, the last two of my company to remain with me. And now, comrades, I have but little more to add. After leaving Captain Webb, Whedbee and I pushed on to Murfreesboro; reaching there, we found the ferry had been destroyed, and we were compelled to cross the Meherrin in a small canoe, swimming our horses. Our nearest route home from Murfreesboro would have been to cross the Chowan at Winton, but the citizens of Murfreesboro
Glasgow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
tion of staying: he always hopes to make money and come back to the old Commonwealth. Possibilities of the future. A friend of his, remarked the speaker, had told him a few days ago that he would so like to live fifty years more, not for the mere pleasure of living, but to see the wonderful progress that Virginia is bound to make in that time. The possibilities cannot be imagined. No man can tell what Virginia will be fifty years from now. Norfolk, Newport's News, Richmond, Roanoke, Glasgow, Buena Vista, Salem, Buchanan, Big-Stone Gap, must become inconceivably great. Before fifty years have elapsed Virginia, now the fourteenth State in the Union in point of wealth and population, will walk a queen among her sisters. But, concluded the Governor, no matter what the future has in store, no greater man would ever spring from her loins than the one whom they were then gathered to honor. Mayor J. Taylor Ellyson responded to the third toast of the evening. The City—Throu
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ommand who is now an Episcopal clergyman in Canada, though he has recently been travelling and preaching in England in the interest of missions. This younger brother took charge of the remains of my youngest boy-brother, killed in action at Chancellorsville, and carried them to Richmond for burial in Hollywood. I have two young hero brothers buried in that beautiful cemetery on Monroe Hill. Robert Edward Lee. [compiled from the Richmond dispatch, January 20, 1891.] First observance ond that brilliant campaign in which he outgeneralled Pope and, shattering his forces at second Manassas, compelled him to seek safety behind the fortifications of Washington, proves it. Fredericksburg and Burnside bear witness to its truth. Chancellorsville and Hooker corroborate it, and Gettysburg, immortal now by the charge of Pickett's brave Virginians, twin brothers in valor and renown with the heroes who died for their country at Thermopylae, tells the same story. The countless numbers of
Northampton County (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
It had been constantly on the move to meet threatened advances from the directions of the Tar and lower Roanoke and the Chowan and Backwater rivers. If I remember aright, during the month of March it had been sent upon two expeditions through Northampton, Hertford and Bertie counties, to repel reported raids of the enemy's cavalry from the Chowan; one, to and below Tarboro to meet a threatened advance from the lower Tar and Roanoke, and one, down the Seaboard and Roanoke railroad towards Frankbout a dozen. This party kept well together, until just before reaching Halifax, when Captain Webb, Wm. H. Whedbee and I pushed on ahead. I quote again from the captain's diary: On Sunday, the 23d of April, at Martin's Cross-Roads, Northampton county, N. C., I parted from Mullen and Whedbee, the last two of my company to remain with me. And now, comrades, I have but little more to add. After leaving Captain Webb, Whedbee and I pushed on to Murfreesboro; reaching there, we found the ferr
Sedan (France) (search for this): chapter 3
e moment to falter in the line of duty. You all remember that when the tidings of the French Emperor's surrender reached Paris, Magenta and Solferino were forgotten, and his lovely wife compelled in the darkness of midnight to abandon her home and fly for her life under the escort of a foreign prince; but when the people heard that Lee had laid down his sword in the midst of its own overwhelming grief the great heart of the South beat with tenfold sympathy and love for its fallen chief. Sedan was the grave of the Third Napoleon; Appomattox was for the paroled prisoner Lee the beginning of a new life, illustrated by a victory in peace more glorious than any that had crowned his arms in war; for he lived to conquer the prejudice and hate of all honorable foes and compel the homage of mankind itself by the exhibition of such moral grandeur, such unsurpassed patience in suffering, such fortitude in misfortune, such unequalled self-command, and such Christ-like self-abnegation, that w
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
t eventful period. After the evacuation of Plymouth, Washington, Kinston and Goldsboro, Brigadier-General L. S. Baker was sent to Weldon, charged with the duty of holding on to that place, not only for the purpose of preserving railroad communication between the other forces in North Carolina and the Army of Northern Virginia, and those along the line of the Wilmington & Weldon railroad, from Goldsboro to that line, but of collecting supplies for these armies from that portion of Eastern Carolina not actually in the possession of the enemy. The authorities recognizing the importance of this position in these respects—it being one of the principal sources of supply for the armies in the field—instructed General Baker to hold it until the last moment, and, at the same time, watch out for and repel any raids of the enemy coming from the Blackwater and Chowan, and from Plymouth, Washington and Goldsboro. With the force under his command this was no light duty, and he was necessarily a
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
versity, and destiny has not spared the rod. For my own part, I felt at the close of the war that there was nothing left here in old Virginia for John, so I concluded to take Horace Greely's advice, Go West. I did so. I went out to St. Louis, Kansas City and Chicago, but everywhere I went I felt so terribly lonesome. I had gotten out of my latitude, and I just broke out in that old strain, Oh carry me back to old Virginia, where the ragged boys were that I loved; and sink or swim, live or dievalleys, all going to form a country well worth fighting for. Virginia pluck. The indomitable pluck of Virginians was well known, the governor said. He remembered hearing about one of Pickett's men who went West shortly after the war—to Kansas City. He saw an advertisement for help in a store. When he answered he found several hundred applicants ahead of him. They were calling out, I was under Grant, I was under Hancock. He passed in front of the desk, and, holding up a hand from whic
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nding, proves the truth of this. Sharpsburg proves it, and that brilliant campaign in which he outgeneralled Pope and, shattering his forces at second Manassas, compelled him to seek safety behind the fortifications of Washington, proves it. Fredericksburg and Burnside bear witness to its truth. Chancellorsville and Hooker corroborate it, and Gettysburg, immortal now by the charge of Pickett's brave Virginians, twin brothers in valor and renown with the heroes who died for their country at Theions had full ranks and the column presented quite an imposing appearance. Over the river. On the return of the procession to Main street the civic organizations and the police were dismissed and the military went over to Portsmouth. Fredericksburg. General Lee's birthday was celebrated by an imposing military and civic parade, one of the largest since the war. The streets were lined with people. From balconies and windows the ladies saluted the procession by waving of handkerchiefs
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
r in camp of instruction or manning some of the heavy redoubts that encircled that city, we took no active part in the bloody scenes that were enacted at Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Cold Harbor, Savage's Station and Malvern Hill, though within sound, and, at times, in sight of bursting of shell and rattling of musketry upon those fields of carnage. From November, 1862, to June, 1863, we helped to guard the line of the Blackwater under Pryor, and assisted in the investment of Suffolk under Longstreet. During the remainder of 1863, with the exception of a few weeks at Chaffin's Bluff, we remained around Petersburg, our principle duty being to stand guard over Fort Clifton. The first five months of 1864 found us on the coast below Wilmington, N. C., about six miles above Fort Fisher. From there we were sent in June, 1864, to Weldon, N. C., where we remained until the close of the war. When approached, several weeks ago, with the request that, at some future meeting,
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
McLean, Hon. John S. Wise, Hon. C. S. Baker, Colonel William Lamb, General P. M. B. Young, Bishop Potter, Rev. Dr. W. W. Page. The toasts. Colonel Dickinson made the opening address, and the following toasts were responded to: The Memory of Lee, Colonel Charles Marshall, of Baltimore; Let Us Have Peace, General Daniel E. Sickles; The Confederate Veteran, General William C. Oates, of Alabama; Our Country, the United States, Colonel Charles T. O'Ferrall, of Winchester, Va.; The Soldier-Journalist of ‘61-‘65, Colonel John A. Cockrill; Our Old Home, the South, Hon. Benton McMillan, of Nashville, Tenn.; Our Soldier Dead, drunk in silence. The Music. The Confederate Veteran Camp quartette, consisting of Messrs. Wilbur Gunn, Frederick Schilling, S. Cameron, and Alfred Poindexter, rendered some excellent music during the evening, The Star-Spangled Banner, I'se Gwine Back to Dixie, and My Country; 'Tis of Thee, being among their selections. Messrs. Gunn and Poindexter sang so
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