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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Ex-Governor Letcher's home. His daughter tells how it was burned during the war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and wife of Mr. Robert J. Showell, a member of the Maryland Legislature, writes from her home in Berlin, Worcester county, Maryland, describing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for three days by the advance guard of the battery, and terrific destruction marked the bursting shells and death dealing missiles, and though my father's house was a special aim of the cannon, it marvelously escaped being struck, but every building in the vicinity suffered for its supposed crime. Ex-Governor Letcher had been warned by
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ion vouchsafed him or his family. A time of harrowing suspense followed, when my mother accidentally heard that my father was in solitary confinement in the old Capitol prison at Washington. There his shoes and top clothing had been taken from him, lest he should attempt escape. His public and private papers were confiscated, and never returned to him, and they now form a part of The record of the Rebellion. His tobacco was burned and his property of all kinds confiscated. Valuable Washington city property was sold for taxes accruing during the war at a sacrifice. To give a deed for the same, he was offered and compelled to accept, by reason of his necessity, a small part of its value. After long imprisonment he was released, without a trial, nor any definite charge preferred against him. His health, broken by confinement and with the further unlawful restriction upon his liberty, he was told that he should not leave Lexington without a written permission from the President,
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Ex-Governor Letcher's home. His daughter tells how it was burned during the war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and wife of Mr. Robert J. Showell, a member of the Maryland Legislature, writes from her home in Berlin, Worcester county, Maryland, describing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for three days by the advance guard of the battery, and terrific destruction marked the bursting shells and death dealing missiles, and though my father's house was a special aim of the cannon, it marvelously escaped being struck, but every building in the vicinity suffered for its supposed crime. Ex-Governor Letcher had been warned by
Lexington, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
His daughter tells how it was burned during the war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and wife of Mr. Robert J. Showell, a member of the Maryland Legislature, writes from her home in Berlin, Worcester county, Maryland, describing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for three days by the advance guard of the battery, and terrific destruction marked the bursting shells and death dealing missiles, and though my father's house was a special aim of the cannon, it marvelously escaped being struck, but every building in the vicinity suffered for its supposed crime. Ex-Governor Letcher had been warned by an ante-bellum friend, a mem
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Ex-Governor Letcher's home. His daughter tells how it was burned during the war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and wife of Mr. Robert J. Showell, a member of the Maryland Legislature, writes from her home in Berlin, Worcester county, Maryland, describing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for three days by the advance guard of the battery, and terrific destruction marked the bursting shells and death dealing missiles, and though my father's house was a special aim of the cannon, it marvelously escaped being struck, but every building in the vicinity suffered for its supposed crime. Ex-Governor Letcher had been warned by
John Letcher (search for this): chapter 31
Ex-Governor Letcher's home. His daughter tells how it was burned during the war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Governor Letcher, of Virginiex-Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and wife of Mr. Robert J. Showell, a member of the Maryland Legislature, writes from her home in Berlin, Worcester county, Maryland, describing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for thr father's house was a special aim of the cannon, it marvelously escaped being struck, but every building in the vicinity suffered for its supposed crime. Ex-Governor Letcher had been warned by an ante-bellum friend, a member of Hunter's brigade, to make his escape. A large reward had been offered for his capture, and dreadful t
Robert J. Showell (search for this): chapter 31
s memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Governor Letcher, of Virginia, and wife of Mr. Robert J. Showell, a member of the Maryland Legislature, writes from her home in Berlin, Worcester county, Maryland, describing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for three days by the advance guard of the battery, and terrific destruction marked the bursting shells and death dealing missiles, and though my father's house was a special aim of the cannon, it maise. The South swells the funeral processions of their great men with feeling hearts, and so the dead past buries its dead. In another part of her letter Mrs. Showell says: When the division of the Union Army under General Hunter passed through the Valley of Virginia it left a record like the proverbial new broom. All
Petersburg Grant (search for this): chapter 31
burned during the war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuable Library and family Relics destroyed. Mrs. Margaret Letcher Showell, daughter of ex-Goveribing the burning of her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexington had been shelled for three days by the advance guard of the battery, and terrificofficer, rang the door-bell, and, with no other warning of any kind, delivered a verbal order from General Hunter, in General Grant's name, for the destruction of the place and without the removal of a single article, not even a change of clothing f of friends, was one night surrounded by armed soldiers, and his surrender was demanded by a written order, signed by General Grant. Without even a private farewell of wife and children, and not entirely dressed, he was taken away, it might have be
Alexander Hunter (search for this): chapter 31
he war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuablef her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexiernor Letcher had been warned by an ante-bellum friend, a member of Hunter's brigade, to make his escape. A large reward had been offered forith no other warning of any kind, delivered a verbal order from General Hunter, in General Grant's name, for the destruction of the place and . Showell says: When the division of the Union Army under General Hunter passed through the Valley of Virginia it left a record like thebefore the Israelites, indicating the favor of God, followed behind Hunter's division, typifying the vengeance of man and the unbridled animosengeance and ruthless destruction of the one. Down the Valley came Hunter's army, and woe and loss and pitiful despair followed everywhere in
George Washington (search for this): chapter 31
ng of its far-famed stock for the support of two armies, and its most venerated inheritance to satisfy the vengeance and ruthless destruction of the one. Down the Valley came Hunter's army, and woe and loss and pitiful despair followed everywhere in his wake! In stern adherence to war principles he spared not even his own brothers and kindred's possessions. Up the Valley went his victorious army, with a torch in one hand and a sword in the other. All that could not be used or carried off was remorselessly destroyed. At the far-famed old town of Lexington their work of destruction was irreparable. The college that owed its name and founding to George Washington was racked and desecrated, its valuable old libraries and scientific apparatus all destroyed. The Virginia Military Institute, the West Point of the South, its picturesque buildings, splendid libraries, pictures, curiosities, and scientific apparatus, all made a magnificent bonfire to celebrate the Northerners' triumph.
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