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Nottoway River (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
end for a load of wood as soon as we arrived. My brigade did not leave camp until 9 o'clock P. M., Thursday, and marched until 6 o'clock P. M., Friday, before going into bivouac. When it was halted about two miles beyond the bridge over the Nottoway river it was hailing, and the poor fellows soon had up their little tents as a partial protection from the weather. We were in motion early next day through the mud, rain and sleet, and went into camp at dark about two miles beyond Jarratt's Statiof this division, but we succeeded in overtaking them Friday afternoon—some parts catching up with Heth's rear Thursday night. I was relieved of the division Friday afternoon by General Wilcox, just before the head of the division crossed the Nottoway river. While building a fire in the woods to keep warm until my brigade, which was the rear one of the division, came up, Mr. Wyatt came along and invited me to his house, where I took shelter for a short time and found it more pleasant than my bi
Cleveland (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
, I love the very ground you stand on. As the colonel omitted, through an oversight, to say anthing to Company K, its captain called out, Colonel, you forgot the Stanly Guards, but we are all here to a man. Old Captain Holland, who addresses his men so very politely, and about whom we have had several good laughs, raised a big laugh again to-day by constantly singing out in his peculiar way, Be firm, Company H; and when the call was made, and they all stood firm, he sang out Colonel, old Cleveland is all right, let us give three cheers to the soldiers, and the biggest sort of an old Rebel yell was raised at once. I wish Colonel Barbour was here to talk to his regiment. After returning from furlough he was immediately and very unexpectedly recalled home again by the illness of his wife. She was not expected to live, and she had expressed a desire to see him. My shoe-shop is now in operation, but as the Government will not allow us to exchange hides for leather, and is unable to
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Wilcox's. * * [Xx.] Mooresville, N. C., August 25, 1890. See Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume X, page 59, and Volume XV, page 359. To General James H. Lane, Auburn, Ala.: * * * The Seventh North Carolina regiment left Petersburg at midnight on the 26th February, 1865; went to Randolph county, N. C., and was quite successfully engaged in arresting and returning absentees to their commands, until called to meet Stoneman, then threatening the railroad from Salisbury to Danville. On Sunday, April 16, 1865, Cooke's and Lane's detachments (Seventh and Forty-sixth North Carolina regiments), Lieutenant-Colonel A. C. McAllister commanding, reported to General D. H. Hill, Lee's corps, army of Tennessee, and surrendered with them near Greensboroa, N. C. On the 29th we turned over four-fifths of the arms, retaining one-fifth. Officers were allowed their side-arms. Thirteen (13) commissioned officers and one hundred and thirty-nine (139) enlisted men belonging to the Se
Harman (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ere ordered back and sent to the right, as parts of the Fifth and Ninth Yankee corps had advanced and driven our cavalry from the works recently constructed near the Peebles House. We moved out on the Boydton Plank-road, then to the left on the Harman road, and formed line of battle on the road leading from the Harman road to the Jones farm. McGowan and I formed the advance; McGowan being on the left of the road supported by Archer, and I on the right supported by McRae. It was a beautiful sHarman road to the Jones farm. McGowan and I formed the advance; McGowan being on the left of the road supported by Archer, and I on the right supported by McRae. It was a beautiful sight to see my sharp-shooters deploying in my front at a double-quick and boldly pushing forward. They engaged the enemy, and were sending back prisoners before we had formed the main line of battle. Their performance was witnessed by a great many outside of our brigade, and it elicited numerous compliments. It was very gratifying to me to hear these brave men thus highly complimented. The whole Yankee force gave way before our general advance and were easily driven back to the breast-works
Mooresville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
t whenever one of our shells exploded in the enemy's lines, and particularly when they became demoralized and commenced running back. Wilcox is for duty again. He had a horse killed yesterday by a stray Minnie. I do not know whether he was on him or not. I hope he is able to resume active command of his division and let me return to my brigade. Heth is in command of the troops from Hill's corps on the right, consisting of parts of his own division and Wilcox's. * * [Xx.] Mooresville, N. C., August 25, 1890. See Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume X, page 59, and Volume XV, page 359. To General James H. Lane, Auburn, Ala.: * * * The Seventh North Carolina regiment left Petersburg at midnight on the 26th February, 1865; went to Randolph county, N. C., and was quite successfully engaged in arresting and returning absentees to their commands, until called to meet Stoneman, then threatening the railroad from Salisbury to Danville. On Sunday, April 16, 1865, Cooke'
Liberty Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
864. extracts from letters written by Brigadier-General J. H. Lane. Liberty Mills, Va., February 5, 1864. In connection with this period the reader is refabeled with the owners' names elicited many hearty laughs. [Ii.] Liberty Mills, Orange Co., Va., March 3, 1864. * * *Governor Vance addressed Scales' bhe Governor must be heard to be properly appreciated. * * [Iii.] Liberty Mills, Orange Co., Va., April 9, 1864. * * * For some time past we have been afle-pits and artillery works to defend the bridge and sweep the turnpike at Liberty Mills. General Lee has issued his transportation order, which will produce quite he looked like the pictures in their geographies. * * * * [iv.] Liberty Mills, Orange county, Va., April 12, 1864. * * * I know you will regret to heaied man, the only married one, by the way, on my staff. * * [V.] Liberty Mills, Orange county, Va., April 22, 1864. * * * I must tell you something of
Orange County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
e shops by regiments and labeled with the owners' names elicited many hearty laughs. [Ii.] Liberty Mills, Orange Co., Va., March 3, 1864. * * *Governor Vance addressed Scales' brigade last Thursday and was to have spoken to mine next dfect upon the soldiers. The Governor must be heard to be properly appreciated. * * [Iii.] Liberty Mills, Orange Co., Va., April 9, 1864. * * * For some time past we have been almost deluged with water. It is still coming down in torrhe was a Chinese, because he looked like the pictures in their geographies. * * * * [iv.] Liberty Mills, Orange county, Va., April 12, 1864. * * * I know you will regret to hear that Captain G. B. Johnston, See ante, pages 52-124. my character. He is a married man, the only married one, by the way, on my staff. * * [V.] Liberty Mills, Orange county, Va., April 22, 1864. * * * I must tell you something of our tournament which came off yesterday. We had a delightfu
Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
iday, before going into bivouac. When it was halted about two miles beyond the bridge over the Nottoway river it was hailing, and the poor fellows soon had up their little tents as a partial protection from the weather. We were in motion early next day through the mud, rain and sleet, and went into camp at dark about two miles beyond Jarratt's Station. Next day we returned to the bridge over the Nottoway, near a Mr. Wyatt's. Yesterday afternoon (Monday) we camped about a mile from Dinwiddie Court House, and to-day we reached our old camp again. Our division did not encounter any of the enemy, as we were in rear. Mahone's division struck the railroad about six miles below Jarratt's and four miles above Bellfield, while we, with Heth's in front, made for Jarratt's. The enemy had torn up the road and were beating a hasty retreat, leaving their cavalry to protect their rear. Only a few shots were exchanged, when they took the back track, and as their infantry had so much the start i
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
afternoon to hear Bishop Lay. His text was the importance of the Holy Ghost, and the sermon was a most excellent one. Everything continues quiet in our front. Eight Yankee deserters have surrendered to my command since my return. Desertions from the enemy are of nightly occurrence. Night before last there was loud cheering all along the Yankee line, and our men responded to it with deafening yells. A deserter told us that it was reported that Schofield had captured twenty thousand Georgia militia, and that they had been ordered to cheer. He also stated that there was great dissatisfaction in the Yankee army, and that more men would desert if they could get a chance. The Sixty-first New York was relieved a few nights since by another regiment, as it was feared that the greater part of it would come over to us. They complain of too much work and drilling and an insufficiency of rations, the latter causing them to spend all their money with the sutlers. I am sorry to say tha
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
been on very short rations for several days past. When not sitting before a nice fire I enjoy myself now in royal slumbers on our French bedstead, which is filled with clean, fine straw, covered with an ample supply of blankets. An officer in the Thirty-third played an amusing joke on a fellow officer of the Thirty-seventh not long since. Norwood, upon whom the joke was played, is the same gallant young officer that escaped wounded from the Gettysburg hospital, disguised as an overgrown Dutch boy, and when taken to army headquarters, General Lee invited him to breakfast in his ridiculous suit. * * * Xix. near Petersburg, April 1, 1865. * * There was fighting on the right yesterday and the day previous. I am told that we drove the enemy, but have not been able to learn any of the particulars. Colonel McCreary, of McGowan's brigade, the same officer that occupied the room with Lieutenant Lane at the hospital last summer, was killed yesterday. Lieutenant-Colonel Cro
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