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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
easure of their several constituents. And they who bore the sword of power were bidden to arm and hold themselves in readiness to execute the commands of the General Congress of this province and this committee. Such was, indeed, that clear and logical conception which the Mecklenburg patriots of 1775 were foremost to form of the civil status created for the American colonies by the address of both houses of Parliament to the Crown, adopted February 7, 1775, declaring the colony of Massachusetts in a state of actual rebellion, and constructively passing the same sentence of outlawry on all the other colonies which were giving her aid and comfort. Fellow-citizens of North Carolina, it is not quite enough to say that the Mecklenburg patriots of 1775 won and wear the unique fame of the precursors of American Independence. The North Carolina Koh-i-noor blazes from a broader facet with a finer light. The Mecklenburg patriots of 1775 also carried onward the very evangel of Dem
Birmingham (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
ep before the eyes of our fellow-countrymen, thronging hither from all lands, this type and style of true Democracy, this type and nobler style of humanity. Is that too proud a claim? Let us see. I brought with me to this celebration of Mecklenburg county Patriotism, a newspaper printed in the great metropolis called London one hundred and sixteen and a half years after the day and deeds we celebrate. It is the London Times of last November 25th. It contains the report of a speech in Birmingham made by the prime minister, an actual ruler of Great Britain to-day. Allow me to read you one short passage from that speech, in which he discusses some Democratic changes proposed—among them, parish councils. He says: I wish to know what they are to do. Parishes are a very strange, a very unequal division of the country. You will find parishes very small and parishes very large. They have no duties so far as I know to perform, and when I am told, You ought to give them parish c
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
e name will be ever honored by the sons of North Carolina, has recorded for all time to come, in hisory of that immortal deed. Not only was North Carolina the first colony in which independence waswith her wise smile. Fellow-citizens of North Carolina, fellow-citizens of Mecklenburg, I congrated to prove to unsettle the verdict of the North Carolina historian. Has it ever occurred to you ect title to all that was ever claimed for North Carolina's sons as the forerunners of American Indendence. What, then, if you gentlemen of North Carolina please, what, then, would actual independeher aid and comfort. Fellow-citizens of North Carolina, it is not quite enough to say that the Merecursors of American Independence. The North Carolina Koh-i-noor blazes from a broader facet wity. There had been no recent conflict upon North Carolina soil; she had no grievances which were notgreat lakes and the gulf. The people of North Carolina contributed their full share throughout th[6 more...]
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. Oration by Hon. D. B. Hill, at the one hundred and Seventeenth anniversary, celebrated at Charlotte, North Carolina, May 20, 1892. [from the Richmond (Va.) times, May 21, 1892.] Senator Hill and his party arrived at Charlotte, North Carolina, at 2 o'clock A. M. May 20, 1892. A reception committee, headed by Mayor Robert Brevard, escorted them from the Richmond and Danville station to the Buford Hotel. After breakfasting Mayor Brevard and the members of the Executive committee called at the hotel and escorted the party to the Central Hotel, from the balcony of which they were to review the parade. Governor Holt was sick and unable to be present. He deputed the pleasant task of welcoming the guests to Adjutant-General James D. Glenn, who received them in the parlors of the Central Hotel, and escorted them to the balcony. Other members of the Governor's staff and of the staff of the Governor of South Carolina were present in full
Mount Vernon (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
gold and vice-royalty. He might have won converts to the fold of Christ by the kindness of his spirit; he gained the execrations of the good angels. He might, like Las Casas, have rebuked the fiendishness of his contemporaries; he set them an example of perverted belief. The triumph of Barcelona led down to the ignominy of Valladolid, with every step in the degredation palpable and resultant. Does anything survive in all this wreck of famous reputations? Yes. There is a tomb at Mount Vernon where one of the mighty dead lies in peace, with honor. The historians have now done their best and their worst. Thank God, we know at last that the Father of his Country has left to the children and the children's children of this great nation, through all generations, the priceless legacy of a pure, unsullied name. George Washington, John Adams and his son, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison (to name no more)—all these, among the great founders of a mighty State; all these, the first
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 1.25
and pay taxes who think John Adams was quite right when he coupled Hamilton and Burr as dangers to the republic and its freedom. The Swiss are told that no such person ever lived among their mountains as William Tell. And now the historians are not content with saying that Christopher Columbus sought a westward passage to the Island of Japan and the Asiatic mainland, was interrupted by the little archipelago off Florida, made his crew take an affidavit that one could march on foot from Cuba across Asia to Spain, but never landed upon North America nor suspected the existence of the Pacific ocean. These terrible historic critics go further still, and I will read you what the last of them, Mr. Justin Winsor, librarian of Harvard University, says in this very quadri-centennial year, which we are about to celebrate by the Chicago Fair, upon the death of Christopher Columbus. We have seen a pitiable man meet a pitiable death. Hardly a name in the profane history is more augu
Barcino (Spain) (search for this): chapter 1.25
such a benignity as the world likes to associate with a maker; he left it a legacy of devastation and crime. He might have been an unselfish promotor of geographical science; he proved a rapid seeker for gold and vice-royalty. He might have won converts to the fold of Christ by the kindness of his spirit; he gained the execrations of the good angels. He might, like Las Casas, have rebuked the fiendishness of his contemporaries; he set them an example of perverted belief. The triumph of Barcelona led down to the ignominy of Valladolid, with every step in the degredation palpable and resultant. Does anything survive in all this wreck of famous reputations? Yes. There is a tomb at Mount Vernon where one of the mighty dead lies in peace, with honor. The historians have now done their best and their worst. Thank God, we know at last that the Father of his Country has left to the children and the children's children of this great nation, through all generations, the priceless
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
asting Mayor Brevard and the members of the Executive committee called at the hotel and escorted the party to the Central Hotel, from the balcony of which they were to review the parade. Governor Holt was sick and unable to be present. He deputed the pleasant task of welcoming the guests to Adjutant-General James D. Glenn, who received them in the parlors of the Central Hotel, and escorted them to the balcony. Other members of the Governor's staff and of the staff of the Governor of South Carolina were present in full uniform. Senator Hill's appearance on the balcony was greeted with prolonged cheering from the crowd which lined the sidewalks. The procession. The procession formed at the junction of Tryon and Ninth streets. In the line were the Governor's Guards and Zouaves, of Columbia; the Fayetteville Light Infantry, the Guilford Grays, of Greensboro; the Hornet's Nest Riflemen and Queen City Guards, of Charlotte, and the Iredell Blues, Cabarras Black Boys, Cleveland Gua
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.25
at? A temporary grant of power by the inhabitants of this county, to be held and exercised by virtue of their choice. Is that all? No—shall hold and exercise their several powers by virtue of the choice, and independent of the crown of Great Britain and former constitution of this province. The exercise of old or new commissions from the crown to mark an enemy of his country. Preservation of the peace and administration of justice provided for and the tenure of their office who borpolis called London one hundred and sixteen and a half years after the day and deeds we celebrate. It is the London Times of last November 25th. It contains the report of a speech in Birmingham made by the prime minister, an actual ruler of Great Britain to-day. Allow me to read you one short passage from that speech, in which he discusses some Democratic changes proposed—among them, parish councils. He says: I wish to know what they are to do. Parishes are a very strange, a very une
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
minded of the achievements at Guilford Courthouse and King's Mountain and other notable and bloody contests, where your citizen soldiers won enduring laurels over England's best disciplined forces. The glorious victory at King's Mountain, occurring as it did at a most gloomy period of the Revolution, when the hopes of patriots had been prostrated and the enemies of America encouraged by the disaster of Camden, turned the tide in the South in favor of the patriot cause as did the victory of Trenton under Washington at the North. The battle of Guilford Courthouse, where Greene measured swords with Cornwallis, was an important struggle, where great military genius and valor contended for mastery, and where the cause of the whole country seemed to be in jeopardy. The heroism of your forefathers made your soil an uncomfortable abiding place for British soldiers. But it is unnecessary to repeat in your presence the story of the American Revolution, because you are as familiar with i
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