hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
December 31st 421 421 Browse Search
Zzzgeneral Early 334 0 Browse Search
April 30th 253 253 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 220 4 Browse Search
S. H. Stout 212 14 Browse Search
September 30th 200 200 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 152 2 Browse Search
January 31st 144 144 Browse Search
Leroy D. Grant 142 0 Browse Search
October 31st 129 129 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 260 total hits in 95 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
of his flight, to place his shattered and demoralized forces under the guns of the navy on the James. The United States navy convoyed the Federal army to its attack upon Fort Henry, in February, 1862—rendered service so effective that capitulation was made to it before the army was in position—and a few days later was its left wing at Fort Donelson, contributing material aid in its reduction. The Mississippi (with its vast supplies so essential to your armies) was in your control, from Cairo to the Gulf, until Foote, from the North, and Farragut from the South, broke its barriers, and began that system of segregation which so pitilessly sapped your vital forces. The presence of the navy at Savannah and the seaboard, gave birth, in the brain of Sherman, to that relentless March to The Sea, which shook, for a time, even the morale of the army of Northern Virginia. Grant, in his Wilderness Campaign, foiled at every point, in his direct road to Richmond, sat down before Peters
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
copper, iron, or leather, with which to build up our establishments; against all these obstacles, and in spite of all these deficiencies, we created, before the close of 1863, literally out of the ground, foundries and rolling mills at Richmond, Selma, Atlanta and Macon, smelting works at Petersburg, chemical works at Charlotte, a powder mill far superior to any in the United States, unsurpassed by any across the ocean, a chain of arsenals, armories and laboratories from Virginia to Alabama. ac), supplied heavy forgings, shafting for steamers, wrought-iron projectiles, gun carriages, blocks, ordnance equipment of every kind, and an ordnance laboratory. Commander Catesby Ap. R. Jones, (late executive officer of the Merrimac), at Selma, Ala., superintended the various branches of a foundry, and the manufacture of heavy guns, forty-seven of which were used in the defences of Mobile and Charleston. At Atlanta, Ga., Lieutenant D. P. McCorkle was in charge of ordnance works for the
Neuse (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
h seas. His daring intrusion into the harbor of Portland, Maine, with the schooner Archer, and capture of the United States Revenue vessel Cushing. His subsequent dash, April 23, 1865, in the river steamer Webb, through the Federal fleet at the mouth of the Red River; running the gauntlet of the Federal fleet at New Orleans the day after. John Taylor Wood, in his many daring captures by boarding, culminating in the boarding and capture of the United States gunboat Underwriter, in the Neuse River, within pistol shot of two of the enemy's forts, the night of February 1, 1864. The heroism of Huger, Kennon, Warley, Read, and others at the capture of New Orleans, fully attest the morale of the naval service, and the promise of its efficiency in a larger field, with better means of offensive action. Semmes in the Sumter and Alabama, Maffit in the Florida, with a bare handful of men, stricken with yellow fever, running the blockade of Mobile in the broad daylight, there refitting
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
otte, a powder mill far superior to any in the United States, unsurpassed by any across the ocean, a chain of arsenals, armories and laboratories from Virginia to Alabama. Zzzstill other difficulties. You had further difficulties still. At the organization of the Confederate government, its treasury was not only empty, butly attest the morale of the naval service, and the promise of its efficiency in a larger field, with better means of offensive action. Semmes in the Sumter and Alabama, Maffit in the Florida, with a bare handful of men, stricken with yellow fever, running the blockade of Mobile in the broad daylight, there refitting and passing ple formulated by this Government, accepted by the English Government, and placed at fifteen and a half millions by the Geneva Award, for losses inflicted by the Alabama, Florida, and Shenandoah, alone. One hundred and eight other ships were destroyed, the loss of which may be placed at five millions, but for which no damage wa
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
river bank; in all five vessels, mounting twenty-eight guns. Zzzbroke the blockade. January 31, 1863, your ironclads, Palmetto State and Chicora, broke the blockade at Charleston, S. C., dispersed the Federal fleet, and secured the surrender of two ships, the Mercedita and Keystone State, but the victory was shorn of its triumphs by the ability of these vessels, subsequently, to elude the pursuit of our slow steaming ships. August 5th, 1864, when Farragut had passed Forts Morgan and Gaines, guarding the entrance to Mobile Bay, his fleet of four monitors and fourteen ships, mounting 159 guns, engaged the Confederate armament, composed of the ironclad Tennessee and three river steamers, mounting twenty-one guns. The latter were quickly placed hors de combat, leaving, the Tennessee alone, to meet the whole force of the enemy. Attacked on all sides by the three monitors and fourteen ships, rammed time and again, run into abeam, at full speed, hammered with steel shot of 440 po
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
overshadowed by your ever memorable prowess in the field, The Navy of the Confederate States. That a navy is—that it may be made an important factor—an efficient cburg, chemical works at Charlotte, a powder mill far superior to any in the United States, unsurpassed by any across the ocean, a chain of arsenals, armories and labthe harbor of Portland, Maine, with the schooner Archer, and capture of the United States Revenue vessel Cushing. His subsequent dash, April 23, 1865, in the river daring captures by boarding, culminating in the boarding and capture of the United States gunboat Underwriter, in the Neuse River, within pistol shot of two of the eama Claims, and the award made thereunder, though perhaps applicable to the United States and Great Britain in future wars, was not at the time, is not now, and nevemediable obstacles that forbade the creation of an effective navy for the Confederate States. We have sought to break the ground, rather than till it, for the future
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
ummoned to the army. There were only three rolling mills in the country, two of which were in Tennessee; (and the third, at Atlanta, was unfitted for heavy work). There were hardly any machine shops fourteen ships, mounting 159 guns, engaged the Confederate armament, composed of the ironclad Tennessee and three river steamers, mounting twenty-one guns. The latter were quickly placed hors de combat, leaving, the Tennessee alone, to meet the whole force of the enemy. Attacked on all sides by the three monitors and fourteen ships, rammed time and again, run into abeam, at full speed, hammvain endeavoring to ram her adversaries, but each time frustrated by their superior speed, the Tennessee waged this unequal contest until her rudder chains were shot away, and thus unmanageable, cripy shot fired by the Monitor. The turrets of these vessels were impenetrable to the shot of the Tennessee, and after four hours of fruitless contest the issue had become that of further disaster and f
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
rvice of the United States Navy in the late war fully attest. McClellan, in the hour of his defeat, before Richmond, made Harrison's Landing the goal of his flight, to place his shattered and demoralized forces under the guns of the navy on the James. The United States navy convoyed the Federal army to its attack upon Fort Henry, in February, 1862—rendered service so effective that capitulation was made to it before the army was in position—and a few days later was its left wing at Fort Donelson, contributing material aid in its reduction. The Mississippi (with its vast supplies so essential to your armies) was in your control, from Cairo to the Gulf, until Foote, from the North, and Farragut from the South, broke its barriers, and began that system of segregation which so pitilessly sapped your vital forces. The presence of the navy at Savannah and the seaboard, gave birth, in the brain of Sherman, to that relentless March to The Sea, which shook, for a time, even the mor
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
vy on the James, and that he be not shorn of this assistance, obstructed the river against the descent of your gunboats. The brief career of the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, delayed the advance of McClellan on the Peninsula—gave you the much needed time to put the defences of Richmond in order—evoked the memorable telegram to Fox,ack of initiative, no want of gallantry in those so fortunate as to secure commands. Tatnall, though near seventy years of age, at Port Royal, Savannah, and Hampton Roads, showed that the fiery courage, which had carried him, in 1859, to the assistance of the English and French at Peiho, in China, with the exclamation, Blood is thicker than water, still animated his breast. The services of Buchanan in the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, March 8 and 9, 1862, and August 5, 1864, in Mobile Bay, need no recital here. Ingram, who had won national fame in 1853, in protecting American citizenship in Smyrna, in the Kostza case, at Charleston, 1863, and elsewhere
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
The Confederate Navy. What it accomplished during the Civil War. [from the Richmond, Va., times, April 15 and 22, 1894.] A very interesting and valuable paper read before R. E. Lee Camp by Mr. Virginius Newton. This valuable resume is from a corrected copy kindly furnished by Mr. Newton, a live citizen of Richmond, whose agency is felt, if not proclaimed. His modesty would fain keep in the shade his merit. His heart holds all of the memorable past, as the readers of the Papers, as well as the local press, warmly know—Ed. Southern Historical Society papers. Several weeks ago Mr. Virginius Newton, of this city, was requested by the members of Lee Camp to read before that body a paper relating to some of the numerous episodes during the late war. Mr. Newton responded with the promptness of a gallant soldier, and selected as his subject the Confederate Navy and its noble deeds He succeeded in giving in the most condensed form a statement of the many noble deeds e
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...