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Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
h Colonel John Murphy as aide. It comprised the following camps and bands: R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, E. Leslie Spence commanding; 250 men. The Social Home Band, of Richmond. Maury Camp, of Fredericksburg, T. F. Proctor commanding; thirty men. Stonewall Camp, Portsmouth, James Turner commanding; thirty-five men. Lee Camp, Alexandria. Band of the Fourth Virginia Regiment; twenty pieces. Pickett-Buchanan Camp, Washington Taylor commanding; 100 men. John Bowie Strange Camp, Charlottesville, Captain Garnett commanding; 150 in line. Pierre-Gibson Camp, Culpeper, D. J. Kyle commanding; seventy-seven men. Magruder-Ewell Camp, Williamsburg, J. D. Moncure commanding; forty men. A. P. Hill Camp Drum-Corps, T. Tence drum-major. A. P. Hill Camp, Petersburg, W. Gordon McCabe commanding; 125 men. Page Puller Camp, Gloucester, R. N. Page commanding; forty men. Niemeyer-Shaw Camp, Berkeley, D. A. Sawyer commanding; forty men. Lee-Jackson Camp, Lexington, William T
Blacksburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
Mr. C. D. Langhorne, Mr. Randolph Tatum. Zzzgovernor, staff and Escort. The cadet-band and corps from the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, at Blacksburg, were just behind General Lee's staff. This is another fine body of young soldier-students, and even outnumbered the corps from the Virginia Military Institutetain John Cussons, who was one of Marse Bob's most valued scouts; Judge George L. Christian, Professor Edmund Harrison, of Richmond College; Rev. G. T. Gray, of Blacksburg, chaplain of the cadet corps of that place; Major J. W. Stall, of Blacksburg; Lieutenant J. P. George, of the Fourth Virginia Cavalry; Captain W. H. Parker, whoBlacksburg; Lieutenant J. P. George, of the Fourth Virginia Cavalry; Captain W. H. Parker, who was in command of the navy-yard at Richmond during the war; Colonel L. D. Starke, who commanded at one time the Third North Carolina Infantry; Captain A. F. Bagby, of King and Queen, who had charge of a battery at the battle of the Crater; Colonel Dudley Evans, who commanded the Twentieth Virginia Cavalry, and his wife; William T
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
t; that her cause was just; that the men who took up arms in her defence were patriots who had even better reason for what they did than had the men who fought at Concord, Lexington, and Bunker Hill; and that her coercion, whatever good may have resulted or may hereafter result from it, was an outrage on liberty. Zzzthe slavery s never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so have we gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Had the South lo its own way. It was a union in which, in reference to questions of foreign policy, every citizen would echo the sentiment expressed by Patrick Henry, when, after Concord and Lexington, in a message to Massachusetts, he said: I am not a Virginian, I am an American, and yet it was a union in which, in reference to questions of domes
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
aptain John A. Hutcheson, sixty-five men. Rev. Dr. Landrum, chaplain of the Richmond Howitzers, rode at their head. Following the artillery were the cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Charles J. Euker, who had as his staff Major W. D. Turner, Captain J. Y. Downman, Captain E. D. Hotchkiss, Captain Stewart McGuire, Captain H. C. Hubbell. Major Branch commanded the squadron, which was formed as follows: Troop A, Stuart Horse Guard, Captain E. J. Euker, forty men in line. Troop F, Chesterfield, Captain I. C. Winston, twenty-eight men in line. Troop H, Henrico, Lieutenant George D. Carter in command, twenty eight men in line. Troop K, Albemarle, Captain Nelson, twenty men in line. Just at this place in the column were the carriages containing the orator, poet, minister, &c., to take part in the ceremonies, the officers of the Association, distinguished guests, city officials, and members of the City Council. Zzzhampton and the Vets. The white head of General Wad
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.27
institutions; when the men of the North, instead of permitting the South to enjoy that domestic peace and tranquility which the Union was intended to secure to every section of the country, were persistently striving to stir up insurrection in the Southern States, and glorifying those who attempted to carry outrage and massacre into Southern homes; when the tendency to centralization was threatening to destroy State independence and build on its ruins a despotism akin to that which enslaved France, when it was said that the government was sent down to the subject provinces by mail from Paris, and the mail was followed by the army, if the provinces did not acquiesce; when the reins of government had passed into the hands of a purely sectional party, avowedly hostile to Southern interests, and declaring the Constitution to be a covenant with hell and a league with the devil, which ought to be supplanted by a so-called higher law; in a word, when it became evident that Northern power was
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
hough eighty-six years old, he marched each time the visitors were on the street. He wore a Confederate gray coat and wide-brim slouch hat, and was heartily applauded along the line of march. Professor Crouch is an old Howitzer, and when he walked into Mr. J. B. Lambert's store, which was headquarters for the veteran Howitzers and Louisianians, accompanied by Mr. James T. Gray, he was accorded a touching reception. Captain F. M. Colston, of the banking firm of Wilson, Colston & Co., Baltimore, while at Maryland headquarters yesterday, fell down a short stairway and bruised his limbs so that he could not join in the parade. Zzznorth Carolina Representatives. By order of Governor Carr, of North Carolina, Adjutant-General Francis H. Cameron, as chief of staff, was the official representative of the Old North State, and was in a carriage in the procession. Accompanying General Cameron were Colonel Bennehan Cameron, Inspector-General of Small-Arms Practice, and Colonel Eugene
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
o establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty. It was a fraternal federation of sovereign States, guaranteeing equal rights to all, and leaving each free to regulate its domestic affairs in its own way. It was a union in which, in reference to questions of foreign policy, every citizen would echo the sentiment expressed by Patrick Henry, when, after Concord and Lexington, in a message to Massachusetts, he said: I am not a Virginian, I am an American, and yet it was a union in which, in reference to questions of domestic policy, every citizen, like that same great orator and patriot, would recognize the right of his own State to his highest allegiance. It was a union in which the people of each State would enjoy the blessings of local self-government, and find in home rule a safeguard against any possible attempt of the Federal power to interfere with their peculiar interests. Zzzc
Fort Erie (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1.27
ll it. Mr. Davis voiced the feeling of the South when he said in the Senate Chamber: If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so have we gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Had the South loved the Union less and clung to it less tenaciously; had she refused to make concessions and sacrifices for its preservation; had she instead of weakening herself by compromises for its sake, withdrawn from it when first her rights were assailed, the pen of the historian would never have recorded the story of Appomattox. It was her attachment to the Union—her unselfish loyalty and patriotism—which caused her to s
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
kett-Buchanan Camp, Washington Taylor commanding; 100 men. John Bowie Strange Camp, Charlottesville, Captain Garnett commanding; 150 in line. Pierre-Gibson Camp, Culpeper, D. J. Kyle commanding; seventy-seven men. Magruder-Ewell Camp, Williamsburg, J. D. Moncure commanding; forty men. A. P. Hill Camp Drum-Corps, T. Tence drum-major. A. P. Hill Camp, Petersburg, W. Gordon McCabe commanding; 125 men. Page Puller Camp, Gloucester, R. N. Page commanding; forty men. Niemeyer-Shawhe war as captain of the Memphis Southern Guards; Rev. Jabez Hall, pastor of the Seventh-Street Christian church; Rev. J. C. Hiden, pastor of Grove-Avenue Baptist church; Colonel John B. Cary, Hon. J. Taylor Ellyson, Dr. William H. Shields, of Williamsburg, and others. Among the ladies were Mrs. Charles T. O'Ferrall, Mrs. Charles E. Wingo, Mrs. R. E. Boykin, Miss Nellie Parker, Mrs. C. O'B. Cowardin, Mrs. L. W. Burton, Miss Hancock; Mrs. A. F. Bagby, of King and Queen; Miss Lizzie Jones, Miss B
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 1.27
fought and died—the principles of State sovereignty and home rule on which this government was wisely founded by our fathers, without which no vast territory like ours can possibly remain democratic, departure from which is rapidly hurrying the country to a choice between anarchy and imperialism, and return to which is essential to the preservation of the life of the republic. Zzzfell in Liberty's cause. In the fourteenth century, when the sturdy sons of Switzerland confronted their Austrian oppressors at Sempach, Arnold von Winkelried, commending his family to the care of his countrymen and crying, Make way for liberty, rushed forward with outstretched hands, and, gathering an armful of spears into his own breast, made an opening in the seemingly impenetrable lines of the enemy, through which his comrades forced their way to victory. Thus falling in the cause of liberty, he won imperishable fame, and his deed, immortalized in song, has awakened noble and generous emotions, an
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